Does Step trigger Disrupt Prey?


Rules Discussion


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Step "doesn't trigger reactions", but feats like the Ranger's Disrupt Prey are free actions, so they would still trigger on a Step, right?


That's most likely a mistake and should be a reaction. Otherwise you could keep hitting someone who walks past you.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Blave wrote:
That's most likely a mistake and should be a reaction. Otherwise you could keep hitting someone who walks past you.

This particular ability Disrupts, so they lose the action at the point of trigger. They'd have to take another Move or Step to trigger another Disrupt Prey, if indeed, Step triggers it.


Cyprion wrote:
This particular ability Disrupts, so they lose the action at the point of trigger. They'd have to take another Move or Step to trigger another Disrupt Prey, if indeed, Step triggers it.

It only disrupts on a Crit. And if it was indeed a free action, you could keep hitting them if they either keep walking past you or if they use another action to move/step again in case the first one was disrupted.

Either way, this would totally breaks everything PF2 tries to balance when it comes to action economy. It's meant to be a reaction. Nothing else makes sense. And as a reaction, it can't hit someone taking a Step.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Blave wrote:
Cyprion wrote:
This particular ability Disrupts, so they lose the action at the point of trigger. They'd have to take another Move or Step to trigger another Disrupt Prey, if indeed, Step triggers it.

It only disrupts on a Crit. And if it was indeed a free action, you could keep hitting them if they either keep walking past you or if they use another action to move/step again in case the first one was disrupted.

Either way, this would totally breaks everything PF2 tries to balance when it comes to action economy. It's meant to be a reaction. Nothing else makes sense. And as a reaction, it can't hit someone taking a Step.

Regardless, the crux of my original question is to confirm that Step doesn't protect against free actions with relevant triggers. Sounds like you agree.


I'm not sure, to be honest. But I can't find any free actions that trigger off of an enemy's actions, movement or otherwise. In fact, pretty much all free actions with a trigger require you to do something yourself or be in a specific situation.

Other than the clearly misprinted Disrupt Prey, the only free action that triggers on an enemy's action is the rogue's defensive roll, which might as well be a mistake. But unlike Disrupt Pray it doesn't break the game, even as a free action.

Seeing this, I'd say Step DOES avoid free actions triggered by movement. It's problably never gonna come up since free acitons don't seem to be meant to trigger of enemy's actions. That's why Step only calls out reaction triggers.

That's my take on the matter, anyway.


While it cannot be used in conjunction with other reactions to the same trigger, since Disrupt Prey is a free action and not a reaction, an enemy's Step cannot avoid it. If a melee ranger goes up to their prey, and the ranger has Disrupt Prey, then that enemy is staying put unless it wants to eat a Strike.


It seems that Mark Seifter has unofficially said that Disrupt Prey is supposed to be a reaction, on his own Discord server. However, that is not quite official errata.

Disrupt Prey is obviously less effective if it is a reaction.


Colette Brunel wrote:

It seems that Mark Seifter has unofficially said that Disrupt Prey is supposed to be a reaction, on his own Discord server. However, that is not quite official errata.

Disrupt Prey is obviously less effective if it is a reaction.

It would however, make Snap Shot make much more sense, since the Ranger has no reactions otherwise.

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