Tengu Eggs: Or, Paizo, do you anatomy?


Rules Discussion

51 to 67 of 67 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
Dark Archive

I genuinely love that for some people the size of tengu eggs can break their immersion :D Dragons being able to fly? Sure! Fireballs having no blast wave, etc. Psh, who cares! Creation of matter via thought? Why not?! But tengu egg size... come on now, there's literally no way we can play the game and keep up a suspension of disbelief!

Never change Pathfinders, I love you all <3 :D


Richard Lowe wrote:
I genuinely love that for some people the size of tengu eggs can break their immersion :D Dragons being able to fly? Sure! Fireballs having no blast wave, etc. Psh, who cares! Creation of matter via thought? Why not?!

(Not trying to be overly snarky.) Well, let us consider if the answer to these questions could perhaps be the work of magic?

Dragons flying? Yes, probably. (Could also involve dragons being basically living blimps as in flight of dragons, but I like the idea of it being magic better.)

Fireballs? Yes. (although it does still sort of bug me that there's no blast wave.)

Creating matter via thought? Obviously.

Tengus laying massive eggs? a bit more unlikely since tengu don't have any inherent magic.

Dark Archive

I mean... "Tengu were created by magic." Boom. It works for dragons, why not awesome bird-like people? :)

But a bit more seriously, the point is that physics, biology, hell all the sciences! ....they don't work in the PF universe like they do in ours, it's just different. So trying to hold the spells, creatures, and so on to the same standards is about as useful an exercise as a chocolate teapot is useful for making tea.


Because lore wise everyone and every thing was created by magic godly magic, but magic nonetheless. Tengus do break a lot of rules if we use regular muscle power wing flight and hollow bones being a severe disability for a humanoid shape.


Temperans wrote:
Because lore wise everyone and every thing was created by magic godly magic, but magic nonetheless. Tengus do break a lot of rules if we use regular muscle power wing flight and hollow bones being a severe disability for a humanoid shape.

Tengu don't fly unless they take on raven form though. They can glide, but that's a little different.


I was thinking of the Tengu Wings racial feat which is a spell-like ability (you magically grow fully functioning wings).

Still gliding using no tools is quite a feat.


Temperans wrote:

I was thinking of the Tengu Wings racial feat which is a spell-like ability (you magically grow fully functioning wings).

Still gliding using no tools is quite a feat.

I forgot about that feat, though it is still magic. And tengu weigh about 70 pounds according to the advanced race guide from pf1. Pretty heavy for a bird,(for comparison, giant condors still weigh less than 40 pounds) but still much lighter than an adult human. Maybe light enough to glide with just their wings, not entirely sure.


Eggstraordinary thread!

Although my main question would be why PF2 needs Tengu egg sizes at all?

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Bards.

Dark Archive

Because curiosity


James Jacobs wrote:
Gisher wrote:
Rysky wrote:
That’s about the measurements for a human newborn I believe.
A newborn human has a head that is about 14 inches in circumference. That's a bit less than 5 inches in diameter. (And even then the skull bones are separate so the head can compress a lot.) An 11 inch diameter egg is huge.

Ah! I bet that's where the error was. It should be 11 inches in circumference, not diameter. That makes a lot more sense to me.

There's still the issue of being 14 inches long. The 11 inch circumference would be about 3 and a half inches in diameter. 14 by 3 is a really weird elongated shape. I suppose the 14 inches could also be circumference along the other axis, then it's be about 4.5" by 3.5" which is smaller than the ostrich (5.9" by 5.1"). That seems a bit too small. I'm thinking that maybe 7" by 6" might be the most reasonable numbers.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I am now thinking of fancy ghouls dining on tengu balut. Thanks, thread.

Scarab Sages

Thank you for this topic. It made me smile.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Doktor Weasel wrote:
There's still the issue of being 14 inches long. The 11 inch circumference would be about 3 and a half inches in diameter. 14 by 3 is a really weird elongated shape. I suppose the 14 inches could also be circumference along the other axis, then it's be about 4.5" by 3.5" which is smaller than the ostrich (5.9" by 5.1"). That seems a bit too small. I'm thinking that maybe 7" by 6" might be the most reasonable numbers.

I think the length (16, not 14) was decided as a multiple factor of the diameter. If we take the original number of 11 inches and pull the excess pi back out and get that 3.5" then multiply by ~1.5 (11 * 1.45 = 16) we get 5", which is pretty reasonable.

JohannVonUlm wrote:
Thank you for this topic. It made me smile.

I know waaaaay too much about birds.

I am not sorry.

;D


PossibleCabbage wrote:
I guess Tengus should have wider pelvises than humans and this should be reflected in the art.

Maybe their pelvises just unhinge, like a snake's jaws. That, or they are lamashtu worshipers and go to the gnolls for C-sections (let's not even touch on gnolls; hyenas are far, far worse examples real life examples of the problem at the center of this thread).

Kyrone wrote:

But that raises a question...

Would cook and eat unfertilized Tengu eggs wrong? They would be discarded anyway.

Because I read very, very weird things, I read a fantasy setting that touched on this issue. Under this explanation, bird creatures would keep even unfertilized eggs and use normal nesting behavior. This is because it tricks their biological clock.

When you take away the egg, their body panics ('something ate my babies, I need to make new babies'; one type of 'selective pressure' mentioned before) and goes straight back into egg laying mode. But sitting on the egg makes the body think it is in caretaker mode, and as such it will put off egg laying for several extra months.

This is kind of like how some women that are not in a relationship take birth control in order to manage their period. And I view this as an essential survival strategy if you faced the threat of laying an 11' diameter egg every month....


lemeres wrote:

Because I read very, very weird things, I read a fantasy setting that touched on this issue. Under this explanation, bird creatures would keep even unfertilized eggs and use normal nesting behavior. This is because it tricks their biological clock.

When you take away the egg, their body panics ('something ate my babies, I need to make new babies'; one type of 'selective pressure' mentioned before) and goes straight back into egg laying mode. But sitting on the egg makes the body think it is in caretaker mode, and as such it will put off egg laying for several extra months.

Yep. And there's a species of songbird (I can't recall which one) that will lay eggs until it has 8 in the nest. Because of the one-egg-a-day production time, researchers actually tested to see how long the bird would keep laying eggs if they kept removing one.

It went on for some time, but I don't recall how long.


As a quick work around, I suggest changing those measurements from inches to centimeters. An 11 cm by 16 cm egg would be large, but I think within the realm of possibility.

51 to 67 of 67 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder Second Edition / Rules Discussion / Tengu Eggs: Or, Paizo, do you anatomy? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.