Is it true that efreeti hate granting wishes?


Pathfinder First Edition General Discussion


Not sure about Pathfinder but I think in DND at least efreeti HATED granting wishes and if forced to do so they would try to twist it to hurt the person making the wish whenever possible. Is this true in Pathfinder as well.


They hate if they don't gain nothing in return
It's like an antipaladin giving god to a church for the hunger (rare case I see in a campaign)


Well, mechanically, pathfinder still gives them mechanics that would make their wish power a 'problem'- Efreeti can cast 3 wishes per day...but only to non genies.

Which means that they have an ability that would do little to nothing for them if they just wanted to live in a quiet little village without anyone bothering them. However, despite that, creatures of other races are constantly coming up to them, seeking this power. And those seeking the wishes might end up using force in an attempt to get wishes (See: the entire genie binder profession).

...so yeah, they are a bit bitter about it. This encourages them to either provide terrible wishes that discourage people from asking in the future, or they enslave the wish maker and kowtow them into using the wishes for the efreeti's benefit. Rince and repeat until they have a long term adversarial attitude towards pretty much all mortals.

Compare that to Marids (water genies) who have a 1/yr wish... but it can be used for their own benefit without any extra clauses. A village could easily live in luxury without much concern. They do not need to lie, cheat, and steal in order to use their own power. So they have plenty of room to be "off doing my own thing" CN.


Considering they are usually LE I imagine they don't like giving wishes to help people. That said, if someone helps an efreeti out in a big way, (such as freeing it from a wizard who has bound it and is trying to squeeze wishes out of it) it would probably give them a wish without trying to twist it.


An efreet will never reveal to the party that he gives whishes to unless the party already now and ask for the wishes before they released him


Yqatuba wrote:
Considering they are usually LE I imagine they don't like giving wishes to help people. That said, if someone helps an efreeti out in a big way, (such as freeing it from a wizard who has bound it and is trying to squeeze wishes out of it) it would probably give them a wish without trying to twist it.

The part that I would be worried about there is that the efreeti might have ideas about how he would get revenge on that wizard (and any other mortals in the area, depending on the exact mood). Also, the efreeti might want to recover from his imprisonment by giving himself a nice little mansion.

And you are a convenient mortal nearby that is expecting wishes. Which makes you a prime target (also, the expectation of a wish might also get you lumped into the same crowd as the wizard; the wizard just used his magic rather than relying on gratitude to weasel out a wish).


Considering their alignment, they might be "monkey-pawing" their wishes...


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A comic for illustrative purposes.


What about a Noble Djinn being freed (who also can grant 3 wishes per day?) Being CG I imagine if a good party freed one at least they would see themselves as forever in their debt, but probably couldn't just come give them wishes whenever they feel like it as that would be too powerful.


Yqatuba wrote:
What about a Noble Djinn being freed (who also can grant 3 wishes per day?) Being CG I imagine if a good party freed one at least they would see themselves as forever in their debt, but probably couldn't just come give them wishes whenever they feel like it as that would be too powerful.

While there would be a great debt owed, it probably wouldn't be worth simply a long period of unrestrained service. More likely would be something along the lines of: "You are hereafter my friend and are welcome guests in my home. To repay you for your gift of freedom to me, I will grant you three great boons¹."

One thing to remember is that, in the Pathfinder setting, casting a large number of wishes is hard on reality and causes side effects.

1: i.e. The PCs probably get three wishes but could use those boons for something else that isn't granted by a wish. For instance, they might spend one of them to gain aid in a battle, (either the Djinn himself or a force of his servants to reinforce the PC's army).


Chakat Firepaw wrote:
One thing to remember is that, in the Pathfinder setting, casting a large number of wishes is hard on reality and causes side effects.

I haven't heard that before, and it sounds interesting. Could you expand on it?


Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Chakat Firepaw wrote:
One thing to remember is that, in the Pathfinder setting, casting a large number of wishes is hard on reality and causes side effects.
I haven't heard that before, and it sounds interesting. Could you expand on it?

It's expanded on in one of the fluff pieces on genies in the legacy of fire AP. It's also somewhat plot relevant.


Efreeti are individuals. Most efreeti I see who grant wishes to players tend to hate granting wishes. Some eftreeti I've run into in modules/adventures seem to have no problem granting wishes to the bad guys. I know it's not helpful, but from source material, it depends on the efreet.

There's no reason that you couldn't have an efreet like any of the following:

One who views granting wishes as just a part of his job. He might try a little quid pro quo ("I'll grant you two wishes if you make one for me...") He might get annoyed if players try to "game" the wish or wish for something out of scope. Maybe he twists the wish. Maybe he explains the parameters of the wish to the players. Or maybe he's had enough and refuses to grant the wishes to the players.

Efreet: You know what? I've had enough of your legalese. I'm not going to grant any wishes.
Players: But you have to grant the wishes! It's genie law!
Efreet: Then call the genie police. Plane Shift!


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I would love to see the looks on my players' faces when I say as a GM, "This efreeti smiles as he grants your wish...."


Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Chakat Firepaw wrote:
One thing to remember is that, in the Pathfinder setting, casting a large number of wishes is hard on reality and causes side effects.
I haven't heard that before, and it sounds interesting. Could you expand on it?

As mentioned, it was brought up in the Legacy of Fire AP, (shock, the AP that involves a lot of wishes being cast). It's a GM's call as to when things start getting noticeable with effects including:

A distortion of perceptions, imposing a -4 on all Wis-based checks.
All spells are distorted in sensory effects, (e.g. a Wall of Stone might manifest as rock-hard rotting salmon meat).
A DC20 caster level check to cast spells, failure of which results in the caster taking 2Xspell level of non-lethal damage and the spell either having its caster level reduced by 1d20 or being Empowered, Enlarged and Extended, (50% chance of either).

If things get particularly bad, a GM can feel free to make things even worse, (e.g. full-up wild magic areas and magical contamination effects).


Chakat Firepaw wrote:
Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Chakat Firepaw wrote:
One thing to remember is that, in the Pathfinder setting, casting a large number of wishes is hard on reality and causes side effects.
I haven't heard that before, and it sounds interesting. Could you expand on it?

As mentioned, it was brought up in the Legacy of Fire AP, (shock, the AP that involves a lot of wishes being cast). It's a GM's call as to when things start getting noticeable with effects including:

A distortion of perceptions, imposing a -4 on all Wis-based checks.
All spells are distorted in sensory effects, (e.g. a Wall of Stone might manifest as rock-hard rotting salmon meat).
A DC20 caster level check to cast spells, failure of which results in the caster taking 2Xspell level of non-lethal damage and the spell either having its caster level reduced by 1d20 or being Empowered, Enlarged and Extended, (50% chance of either).

If things get particularly bad, a GM can feel free to make things even worse, (e.g. full-up wild magic areas and magical contamination effects).

Cool! Do they say how large an area is affected (local / city / continent / global) or is that a GM call?

Does miracle contribute to reality-bending?


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Re: side effects: Up to the GM.

Keep in mind these aren't core rules; in fact, they aren't even Pathfinder RPG rules (Legacy of Fire was a 3.5 product). Take it for what it's worth.


And that's why you take the Thoughtful Wishmaker trait, to ensure that your GM the genie can't mess around with your wishes. Alternatively, put a lot of ranks into Profession (barrister) and Sense Motive.


Oh wow, I never knew about that feat until now. I always thought though you should be able to make some kind of check (not sure if it would be wis or cha) to see if you say the wish right as your character (if you're a high level sor/wiz) presumably has alot higher mental stats than you do in real life,


Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Cool! Do they say how large an area is affected (local / city / continent / global) or is that a GM call?

Largely a GM call, informed by the scale of the wish that pushed things too far.

Fuzzy-Wuzzy wrote:
Does miracle contribute to reality-bending?

The article didn't specifically say, I would say it's likely less dangerous because Miracle effects are going to be less 'bending reality' and more 'divine power does stuff'. (e.g. A Wish protects you from fire by changing reality to make you fire immune, Miracle has your god cast what amounts to a 'super-Mythic' protection spell.)

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