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5th Edition (And Beyond)


What adventures are the 5e players and GMs around here participating in? My weekly group is alternating between Curse of Strahd and a home brew campaign. My character in Curse of Strahd is a female tiefling rogue named Sineya Fray modeled after Melaka Fray from the Fray comic series. My other character is Zodac, a goliath storm giant soul sorcerer.

I am currently debating converting my new Pathfinder Thornkeep campaign to 5e as the characters just hit 2nd, so this is a good time to switch. This game is monthly with my friends from high school plus a few others.

Sovereign Court

We are doing Rise of Tiamat over lunch at work. 5E is rather dull, IMO, but it does move with required speed to make it a serviceable lunch hour RPG. Not sure if the campaign is dull, or just our GM failing to bring it to life. Looking forward to moving on.


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I'm currently running a "kick in the door, loot the room, dodge the random monsters" dungeon crawl.

Sadly my players just don't go for plots, campaigns, backstories or even coherent characters really. They like being powerful and finding magic items. I find it quite depressing running games with an actual storyline, since there's only a 50/50 chance they'll bother to even pay attention to clues or lore drops, let alone try and piece them together.

This campaign (of a massive megadungeon with ever harder monsters/traps and ever more valuable loot the deeper you go) has proven to be the most exciting to them in a long time. Really starting to think it's time for me to give up on gaming altogether. :(


Steve Geddes wrote:

I'm currently running a "kick in the door, loot the room, dodge the random monsters" dungeon crawl.

Sadly my players just don't go for plots, campaigns, backstories or even coherent characters really. They like being powerful and finding magic items. I find it quite depressing running games with an actual storyline, since there's only a 50/50 chance they'll bother to even pay attention to clues or lore drops, let alone try and piece them together.

This campaign (of a massive megadungeon with ever harder monsters/traps and ever more valuable loot the deeper you go) has proven to be the most exciting to them in a long time. Really starting to think it's time for me to give up on gaming altogether. :(

What happens when they come across a puzzle or obstacle that has to be solved in some way other than killing a monster? That's really a bummer when you're forced to run games you aren't interested in. Have any of your players tried GMing? Are you running a home brew, or modules like Undermountain in Forgotten Realms or the Emerald Spire in Pathfinder?


Pan wrote:
We are doing Rise of Tiamat over lunch at work. 5E is rather dull, IMO, but it does move with required speed to make it a serviceable lunch hour RPG. Not sure if the campaign is dull, or just our GM failing to bring it to life. Looking forward to moving on.

With time limitations, it can be challenging to really dig deep as a DM. Hopefully it gets better rather than worse.

Sovereign Court

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Steve Geddes wrote:

I'm currently running a "kick in the door, loot the room, dodge the random monsters" dungeon crawl.

Sadly my players just don't go for plots, campaigns, backstories or even coherent characters really. They like being powerful and finding magic items. I find it quite depressing running games with an actual storyline, since there's only a 50/50 chance they'll bother to even pay attention to clues or lore drops, let alone try and piece them together.

This campaign (of a massive megadungeon with ever harder monsters/traps and ever more valuable loot the deeper you go) has proven to be the most exciting to them in a long time. Really starting to think it's time for me to give up on gaming altogether. :(

I had a similar problem a few years back. My group just seemed like murderhobos 'r' them. I was getting discouraged, but kept trying. At one point, I was ready to throw in the towel. I decided to ask them how they felt about the game. To my surprise, they all lavished praise on me as GM and how much better the game was than their usual experiences. That sort of refueled my tank and got me back into running the best game I could.

It can be tough not having an exact match of play style preferences. Though, with some effort you can usually find an acceptable middle ground.

In any event, good luck on your future gaming!

Sovereign Court

RedRobe wrote:
Pan wrote:
We are doing Rise of Tiamat over lunch at work. 5E is rather dull, IMO, but it does move with required speed to make it a serviceable lunch hour RPG. Not sure if the campaign is dull, or just our GM failing to bring it to life. Looking forward to moving on.
With time limitations, it can be challenging to really dig deep as a DM. Hopefully it gets better rather than worse.

I make it sound worse than it is. It's true, Id much rather be playing PF than 5E, but I can see advantages to 5E.


Pan wrote:
RedRobe wrote:
Pan wrote:
We are doing Rise of Tiamat over lunch at work. 5E is rather dull, IMO, but it does move with required speed to make it a serviceable lunch hour RPG. Not sure if the campaign is dull, or just our GM failing to bring it to life. Looking forward to moving on.
With time limitations, it can be challenging to really dig deep as a DM. Hopefully it gets better rather than worse.
I make it sound worse than it is. It's true, Id much rather be playing PF than 5E, but I can see advantages to 5E.

Pathfinder has been both of my groups' system of choice for years. However, we've recently begun playing 5e, and my weekly group seems to like it pretty well. I'm in the middle of an Iron Gods campaign that I had thought about converting to 5e, but the PCs' classes are so rooted in PF with archetypes and hybrid classes that it would be too difficult to make the change. We enjoy the streamlined nature of the 5e rules, and are going to attempt to incorporate the combat and movement rules, as well as long and short rests.


Pan wrote:
RedRobe wrote:
Pan wrote:
We are doing Rise of Tiamat over lunch at work. 5E is rather dull, IMO, but it does move with required speed to make it a serviceable lunch hour RPG. Not sure if the campaign is dull, or just our GM failing to bring it to life. Looking forward to moving on.
With time limitations, it can be challenging to really dig deep as a DM. Hopefully it gets better rather than worse.
I make it sound worse than it is. It's true, Id much rather be playing PF than 5E, but I can see advantages to 5E.

One can rules-and-options-up 5e all the way to 3.PF.

I much preferred to run 5e over the other systems but backed out of running games for all the usual reasons, which boil down to flaky players.

My cousin's game is one I still participate in (for now) and it is a monstrous amalgam of PF and 3.5 set in a modified Eberron. The whole situation is not me but I actually enjoy all the regulars. Anytime I get stuck on the options I squawk for help and take the first solution proffered.


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RedRobe wrote:
Steve Geddes wrote:

I'm currently running a "kick in the door, loot the room, dodge the random monsters" dungeon crawl.

Sadly my players just don't go for plots, campaigns, backstories or even coherent characters really. They like being powerful and finding magic items. I find it quite depressing running games with an actual storyline, since there's only a 50/50 chance they'll bother to even pay attention to clues or lore drops, let alone try and piece them together.

This campaign (of a massive megadungeon with ever harder monsters/traps and ever more valuable loot the deeper you go) has proven to be the most exciting to them in a long time. Really starting to think it's time for me to give up on gaming altogether. :(

What happens when they come across a puzzle or obstacle that has to be solved in some way other than killing a monster? That's really a bummer when you're forced to run games you aren't interested in. Have any of your players tried GMing? Are you running a home brew, or modules like Undermountain in Forgotten Realms or the Emerald Spire in Pathfinder?

If they come across an obstacle that can't be resolved with violence, they usually try violence until they all die. (They never run away, either - years of assuming "if the module put the monster here, we're obviously supposed to be able to kill it!")

We do rotate DMs. Unfortunately, I'm the only one who's able (or willing) to put much time into the game outside of the sessions. So when I play it's generally with a DM reading out the textbox who hasn't done more than skimread the module a few months prior. It doesn't result in much meaningful story but really just a string of tactical battles (which is what most of the group like).

I've always run APs or WotC modules before but this time it's just a village with a massive, ruined castle half a day's travel away - complete with thirteen level dungeon underneath it. The "plot" is: go as deep as we can get away with, grab as much loot as we can, run back to town to sell it and go up a level, return...

I've invented a random treasure system and an abstract card-based encumbrance system (they draw random item cards to see what they find and I hand out little bags of Campaign Coins as treasure). They're liking that, but have shown no interest in understanding why the dungeon's there, who's living there now, the history or anything like that.

Ultimately, the things I like no longer line up with the things my group likes. I pretty much have to get what I can out of it or quit, I think. (Though I will admit to getting irritated when we start the session and nobody else has levelled up yet in the intervening weeks because "I don't get spare time like you!" followed by postponing the levelling up for a half hour discussion about all the pokemon they managed to catch/level up/trade.... Grrr).

/grumble


Steve Geddes wrote:
RedRobe wrote:
Steve Geddes wrote:

I'm currently running a "kick in the door, loot the room, dodge the random monsters" dungeon crawl.

Sadly my players just don't go for plots, campaigns, backstories or even coherent characters really. They like being powerful and finding magic items. I find it quite depressing running games with an actual storyline, since there's only a 50/50 chance they'll bother to even pay attention to clues or lore drops, let alone try and piece them together.

This campaign (of a massive megadungeon with ever harder monsters/traps and ever more valuable loot the deeper you go) has proven to be the most exciting to them in a long time. Really starting to think it's time for me to give up on gaming altogether. :(

What happens when they come across a puzzle or obstacle that has to be solved in some way other than killing a monster? That's really a bummer when you're forced to run games you aren't interested in. Have any of your players tried GMing? Are you running a home brew, or modules like Undermountain in Forgotten Realms or the Emerald Spire in Pathfinder?

If they come across an obstacle that can't be resolved with violence, they usually try violence until they all die. (They never run away, either - years of assuming "if the module put the monster here, we're obviously supposed to be able to kill it!")

We do rotate DMs. Unfortunately, I'm the only one who's able (or willing) to put much time into the game outside of the sessions. So when I play it's generally with a DM reading out the textbox who hasn't done more than skimread the module a few months prior. It doesn't result in much meaningful story but really just a string of tactical battles (which is what most of the group like).

I've always run APs or WotC modules before but this time it's just a village with a massive, ruined castle half a day's travel away - complete with thirteen level dungeon underneath it. The "plot" is: go as deep as we can get away with, grab as much loot as we can,...

So what happens when you, the sole role-player in the group, tries to role-play through a situation? Do they let you, or just say "F this!" and Leroy Jenkins the encounter? Also, how long have the others been playing tabletop RPGs?


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If the DM's not interesting in roleplay, I'm guessing the NPCs just flat out won't respond to a PC's attempts at conversation/what-have-you.

I once had a DM who would never let us interrogate a captured enemy because they were all "more afraid of their boss than they are of you," despite the fact that their boss wasn't anywhere near and we were the people with our knives at their throats. If we pressed the issue and insisted on trying to ask questions, they all had the fantasy equivalent of cyanide capsules in their molars and died instantly and horribly in front of us. (In reality, of course, he wouldn't let us question them because he was just picking statblocks out of the Monster Manual and couldn't tell us himself who they were working for or what their goal was; they were just there for us to fight and level up.)

His storekeepers wouldn't bargain, and whatever we wanted to buy was always 20-100 gp less than whatever we happened to have (so we could buy one thing but nothing else;he would literally look at our character sheets before giving us a price); and a PC bard was incapable of earning any money by performing so that our only choice was accepting the job as caravan guards we were offered or starving on the streets. NPCs delivered the plot hooks they were predetermined to deliver whether we sought them out or not, and nothing we did could make them tell us any more or any less.

Honestly, one time a fellow player had his PC walk right into the enemy camp to have a talk with the BBEG -- all because he knew that there was no way the DM would kill the PCs before the predetermined combat that was still a few days away. And he was right; his PC marched through the enemy complex, talked some trash at the BBEG, and walked out again untouched.

Honestly, he's the reason I started DMing. He'd been playing for twenty years or so at the time (this was back in AD&D 2e), and I was a newbie; but I figured, no matter what, I could do better than that.


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Joana wrote:
If the DM's not interesting in roleplay, I'm guessing the NPCs just flat out won't respond to a PC's attempts at conversation/what-have-you.

Pretty much. I mean the DMs generally try to give me a chance (or at least go through the motions) but inevitably, no matter what I say, we end up fighting them just the way we were always going to.

I can't think of a single combat in the last four/five years where negotiation/stealth/other tactic has had any impact on the battles we've faced. (There probably are some I've forgotten, but they're few and far between). When I mention this to the group, it's generally rebuffed along the lines of "if an encounter can be solved with just one skill roll then that's way too easy" which I can understand, but I feel is an incorrect analysis. It may well be quicker than slogging through a variety of combats with the leader, their lieutenants and their varied array of mooks but I don't think it's easier, since often it requires a particular dedication of PC resources in order to be good enough at social/other skills to make the check worthwhile. A series of level-appropriate challenges is going to take some time, but it's pretty much guaranteed we're going to win in the end - so I question labelling that "hard".

As it is, in our games, if you devote any character resources into non-combat focussed things, you're really just making yourself worse - there's no payoff in terms of actual gameplay in being wonderful at diplomacy, stealth or any of the other ways one might try and resolve encounters and there's no value given to progressing the story - "the story" is generally just a series of combats of gradually escalating difficulty.

Don't get me wrong - I'm no shakespearean actor or anything. I'm a pretty poor roleplayer in the scheme of things, I suspect. It's just starting to get me down when I begin talking to the king's advisor or whoever and the other players whip out their phones to see if they've been kicked out of the pokemon gym.

It really crystalised for me when I started writing this campaign deliberately geared to their interests - no plot, no world setting beyond an inn, a market and a ruined castle+dungeon to explore. If it were me, I wouldn't be able to stop creating backstory and so forth. As it is, the sessions are purely loot the dungeon, run back to town, sell stuff and go up a level, repeat... It's going well, but it's really not what I'm looking for. There are multiple PCs with divine spells but their players haven't actually picked a god (or made up a name) - they just chose what domain suited them mechanically and moved on.

I've just started up in a PBP game again and maybe I'll look into roll20 or something one of these days. The idea of playing with anyone I haven't known for thirty years is terrifying, unfortunately but maybe if I can find the right group. :/


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RedRobe wrote:
Also, how long have the others been playing tabletop RPGs?

We all started as kids - it was either 79 or 80, I can't quite remember. I've pretty much exclusively played with the same seven or eight people since then.

By the way - apologies for derailing your thread. I think I needed a place to vent and chose here. Sorry about that, not really the right place. :/


Quark Blast wrote:
Pan wrote:
RedRobe wrote:
Pan wrote:
We are doing Rise of Tiamat over lunch at work. 5E is rather dull, IMO, but it does move with required speed to make it a serviceable lunch hour RPG. Not sure if the campaign is dull, or just our GM failing to bring it to life. Looking forward to moving on.
With time limitations, it can be challenging to really dig deep as a DM. Hopefully it gets better rather than worse.
I make it sound worse than it is. It's true, Id much rather be playing PF than 5E, but I can see advantages to 5E.

One can rules-and-options-up 5e all the way to 3.PF.

I much preferred to run 5e over the other systems but backed out of running games for all the usual reasons, which boil down to flaky players.

My cousin's game is one I still participate in (for now) and it is a monstrous amalgam of PF and 3.5 set in a modified Eberron. The whole situation is not me but I actually enjoy all the regulars. Anytime I get stuck on the options I squawk for help and take the first solution proffered.

I love Eberron. I ran the Age of Worms Adventure Path in Dungeon Magazine and set the campaign in Eberron. My most recent home brew campaign, and longest to date, used the Pathfinder rules, and was a mash-up of Dungeon modules, Pathfinder modules, 3.5 modules, and the second half of the Shackled City Adventure path. One of the characters was a 3.5 warlock with the Pathfinder sorcerer Abyssal bloodline powers tacked on to show the Abyssal pact aspect of his warlock powers.


Steve Geddes wrote:
RedRobe wrote:
Also, how long have the others been playing tabletop RPGs?

We all started as kids - it was either 79 or 80, I can't quite remember. I've pretty much exclusively played with the same seven or eight people since then.

By the way - apologies for derailing your thread. I think I needed a place to vent and chose here. Sorry about that, not really the right place. :/

No apologies necessary. Its all good conversation, and you did mention the current 5e game you're running, so its still on-theme.


RedRobe wrote:
I love Eberron. I ran the Age of Worms Adventure Path in Dungeon Magazine and set the campaign in Eberron. My most recent home brew campaign, and longest to date, used the Pathfinder rules, and was a mash-up of Dungeon modules, Pathfinder modules, 3.5 modules, and the second half of the Shackled City Adventure path. One of the characters was a 3.5 warlock with the Pathfinder sorcerer Abyssal bloodline powers tacked on to show the Abyssal pact aspect of his warlock powers.

A mere biased opinion follows:

Eberron out of the box reminds me of my campaign notes the summer I first decided I would be a GM. I shudder when I look over those notes and early adventures. I've only seen Eberron used in a heavily home-brewed way. I think that is a necessity as it's essentially unroleplayable as given.

Throw out verisimilitude and you can play anything. And even given that there is a fantasy aspect to FRPGs, I don't enjoy a system that lacks verisimilitude. World building is crucial for a RPG setting and Eberron as given totally lacks that. Just like my campaign notes from my early teen foray into GMing.

I do very much enjoy my cousin's campaign. He leaves out some of the more egregious disconnects and GMs in a way so that everyone is included in the storytelling, as much and as little as they care to. Any PC build you want to play he will allow with the caveat that things could get dialed back for your PC if it proves to be OP.

I love Eberron too but in a very qualified way.
:D


Quark Blast wrote:
RedRobe wrote:
I love Eberron. I ran the Age of Worms Adventure Path in Dungeon Magazine and set the campaign in Eberron. My most recent home brew campaign, and longest to date, used the Pathfinder rules, and was a mash-up of Dungeon modules, Pathfinder modules, 3.5 modules, and the second half of the Shackled City Adventure path. One of the characters was a 3.5 warlock with the Pathfinder sorcerer Abyssal bloodline powers tacked on to show the Abyssal pact aspect of his warlock powers.

A mere biased opinion follows:

Eberron out of the box reminds me of my campaign notes the summer I first decided I would be a GM. I shudder when I look over those notes and early adventures. I've only seen Eberron used in a heavily home-brewed way. I think that is a necessity as it's essentially unroleplayable as given.

Throw out verisimilitude and you can play anything. And even given that there is a fantasy aspect to FRPGs, I don't enjoy a system that lacks verisimilitude. World building is crucial for a RPG setting and Eberron as given totally lacks that. Just like my campaign notes from my early teen foray into GMing.

I do very much enjoy my cousin's campaign. He leaves out some of the more egregious disconnects and GMs in a way so that everyone is included in the storytelling, as much and as little as they care to. Any PC build you want to play he will allow with the caveat that things could get dialed back for your PC if it proves to be OP.

I love Eberron too but in a very qualified way.
:D

I was all-in on Eberron when it was first released. It very much reminded me of the comic Battle Chasers from the mid-late 90s. If I ever revisit that world, I would like to run the Savage Tide Adventure Path there as a follow-up to my Age of Worms campaign.


I didn't mention before, but I have a solo adventure in progress when I need my gaming fix, and can't play. I have rolled up 4 characters based on 4 of my Skyrim characters: Irabett Tirabas the goliath paladin of Sif, Rygus Redblade the (future) eldritch knight fighter, Drogonna Rhaegar the green dragonborn thief rogue, and Nimali Karuil the wood elf druid (subclass to be determined). I am playing through the Pathfinder adventure Crypt of the Everflame converted on the fly to 5e. It feels a lot like when I used to playtest adventures for my D&D 2e group in high school.


I'm currently in an original campaign, playing a Cleric of Pelor (alongside an illusionist wizard, a spirit ancestor barbarian, an I-don't-actually-know Rogue, and occasionally additional friends). My last game both started and ended with my character unconscious. XD Man, I really need to keep pumping Constitution...


My group usually plays Pathfinder, and we're all now involved in PFS as well. As a break, one of them ran Lost Mine of Phandelver (the 5E Starter Set adventure) for us. Around that time, my kids were finally old enough for longer RPG adventures, and I settled on running some published 5E modules for them as a way to 1. have all of us (including me) learn the system better, and 2. not require me to do as much prep when I was already running a full-time homebrew game for the regular group. We started Phandelver, but had to abandon it when it became too hard to schedule with the other family we played with. So I then started running Tales from the Yawning Portal for just my wife and kids, and we've completed the first two adventures.

The kids are now active in PFS, so we haven't had the time to continue Yawning Portal, but I would love to get back to it someday. (OTOH, my daughter is now in high school, and her school started a D&D club. So she's now entirely obsessed with running her own games for her friends.)

When my current PF home game ends, I will almost certainly want to run something less crunchy for a while--especially if this game manages to reach mythic tiers and very high levels, as I hope it will. I've given a lot of thought to running another campaign in Green Ronin's Freeport setting, this time using 5E. (Ghosts of Saltmarsh promises to be a must-have resource for that!) So that seems most likely to be my next campaign--but that might not be for a few years yet...

If you want to hear more about my 5E games, check out my blog:
Lost Mine of Phandelver
Tales from the Yawning Portal
5E Freeport

Liberty's Edge

Currently, I’m DMing a 5E campaign set in Osirion, making heavy use of Mummies Mask AP (but my own story). We are a year into it with about six months left to go. It’s easy to convert from PF1 monsters and traps to 5E on the fly (especially since I reskin with MM, ToB, and CC). Love my pathfinder pawns and Kobold Publishing also has pawns for ToB and CC.

My past two campaigns have also been with 5E set in other parts of Golarion. I’m so looking forward to the New Kingmaker books!!!


marv wrote:

Currently, I’m DMing a 5E campaign set in Osirion, making heavy use of Mummies Mask AP (but my own story). We are a year into it with about six months left to go. It’s easy to convert from PF1 monsters and traps to 5E on the fly (especially since I reskin with MM, ToB, and CC). Love my pathfinder pawns and Kobold Publishing also has pawns for ToB and CC.

My past two campaigns have also been with 5E set in other parts of Golarion. I’m so looking forward to the New Kingmaker books!!!

Do you do full conversions of the PF material you use, or just convert on the fly? I am finding some of the PF stuff in Crypt to be on the easy side compared to 5e. For example, PF skeletons have only 4 hp, while 5e skeletons I sub in are much hardier.


Has anyone played/DMed the Stranger Things starter adventure? I love the theme, but I think I need to flesh it out a bit more. I will run it for my college friends during our next twice-annual weekend gaming event. I will need to beef up the encounters as there will be 10 players. All but 4 of us will be new to 5e (my weekly crew includes these 4).


Tim Emrick wrote:

My group usually plays Pathfinder, and we're all now involved in PFS as well. As a break, one of them ran Lost Mine of Phandelver (the 5E Starter Set adventure) for us. Around that time, my kids were finally old enough for longer RPG adventures, and I settled on running some published 5E modules for them as a way to 1. have all of us (including me) learn the system better, and 2. not require me to do as much prep when I was already running a full-time homebrew game for the regular group. We started Phandelver, but had to abandon it when it became too hard to schedule with the other family we played with. So I then started running Tales from the Yawning Portal for just my wife and kids, and we've completed the first two adventures.

The kids are now active in PFS, so we haven't had the time to continue Yawning Portal, but I would love to get back to it someday. (OTOH, my daughter is now in high school, and her school started a D&D club. So she's now entirely obsessed with running her own games for her friends.)

When my current PF home game ends, I will almost certainly want to run something less crunchy for a while--especially if this game manages to reach mythic tiers and very high levels, as I hope it will. I've given a lot of thought to running another campaign in Green Ronin's Freeport setting, this time using 5E. (Ghosts of Saltmarsh promises to be a must-have resource for that!) So that seems most likely to be my next campaign--but that might not be for a few years yet...

If you want to hear more about my 5E games, check out my blog:
Lost Mine of Phandelver
Tales from the Yawning Portal
5E Freeport

I am right there with you with the desire to run less crunchy games. However, I sometimes feel like I'm betraying Pathfinder 1e by wanting to run D&D. My home brew setting was built using Pathfinder, and I have recently started running Thornkeep in my setting. However, I decided this week to force a conversion to 5e so my monthly high school group doesn't stagnate.

Speaking of Tales from the Yawning Portal, I saw that The Sunless Citadel and Forge of Fury were converted to 5e in it. I have wanted to run the 3.0 "Ashardalon" series of adventures for a long time, but haven't really had an opportunity with all the cool APs being released by Paizo. Are these the first two adventures in the book you said you ran?

Liberty's Edge

RedRobe wrote:


Do you do full conversions of the PF material you use, or just convert on the fly? I am finding some of the PF stuff in Crypt to be on the easy side compared to 5e. For example, PF skeletons have only 4 hp, while 5e skeletons I sub in are much hardier.

On the fly. As you point out the game balance considerations are too different between the systems to run as intended. Instead I balance encounters on the fly, or using Kobolt Fight Club as a check on my CR game balance math if I’m unsure.

Plus I customize my adventures so much anyway. You?


I am liking 5E. I have a just leveled to 5 Sun elf blade singer that I am playing in Adventure League. I am also beginning a 1st level drow hex blade warlock to go through the Tales of the Yawning Portal.


One observation that I have made, and it might or might not be more generalizable, is that most D and D players that I have found in Adventure League do very little in investment in the world that they are in. Adventure League takes place in Faerun. Players do not really take the time to get to know the differences between moon and sun elves or anything else along those lines. It seems like that they are just there to roll dice. It is more fun when people actually invest themselves a bit in the world that they are playing in. That gives all the flavor.

Liberty's Edge

Terevalis Unctio of House Mysti wrote:
One observation that I have made, and it might or might not be more generalizable, is that most D and D players that I have found in Adventure League do very little in investment in the world that they are in. Adventure League takes place in Faerun. Players do not really take the time to get to know the differences between moon and sun elves or anything else along those lines. It seems like that they are just there to roll dice. It is more fun when people actually invest themselves a bit in the world that they are playing in. That gives all the flavor.

Not sure I agree with that generalization. However, speaking as a long time fan of Faerun, I far and away prefer to set my campaigns in Golarion. And it’s precisely because it’s easy to find interesting, detailed, and consistent Paizo source material for things like the difference between Mordant Spire Elves and Wild Elves. I think that makes it easier for players and DMs, alike, to add role playing depth to PCs and NPCs.

Most of the good material I have on moon and sun Elves is on my bookshelf but out of print, which doesn’t help my players. Paizo’s PDF policy for everything means nothing ever goes out of print. Plus Paizo is better at editing their setting, for consistency and adding in interesting plot hooks, IMHO.


marv wrote:

...

Most of the good material I have on moon and sun Elves is on my bookshelf but out of print, which doesn’t help my players. Paizo’s PDF policy for everything means nothing ever goes out of print. Plus Paizo is better at editing their setting, for consistency and adding in interesting plot hooks, IMHO.

D&D Beyond has all your favorite books via PDF til the end of time or 6e, whichever comes first.


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Quark Blast wrote:
marv wrote:

...

Most of the good material I have on moon and sun Elves is on my bookshelf but out of print, which doesn’t help my players. Paizo’s PDF policy for everything means nothing ever goes out of print. Plus Paizo is better at editing their setting, for consistency and adding in interesting plot hooks, IMHO.
D&D Beyond has all your favorite books via PDF til the end of time or 6e, whichever comes first.

Not if WotC revoke the license to distribute them again (as they've done previously).

Liberty's Edge

Steve Geddes wrote:
Quark Blast wrote:
marv wrote:

...

Most of the good material I have on moon and sun Elves is on my bookshelf but out of print, which doesn’t help my players. Paizo’s PDF policy for everything means nothing ever goes out of print. Plus Paizo is better at editing their setting, for consistency and adding in interesting plot hooks, IMHO.
D&D Beyond has all your favorite books via PDF til the end of time or 6e, whichever comes first.
Not if WotC revoke the license to distribute them again (as they've done previously).

Exactly


RedRobe wrote:
Speaking of Tales from the Yawning Portal, I saw that The Sunless Citadel and Forge of Fury were converted to 5e in it. I have wanted to run the 3.0 "Ashardalon" series of adventures for a long time, but haven't really had an opportunity with all the cool APs being released by Paizo. Are these the first two adventures in the book you said you ran?

Yes, those are the two adventures that I've run from that book. If and when we get back to it, Lost Shrine of Tomoachan will be next.


Terevalis Unctio of House Mysti wrote:
One observation that I have made, and it might or might not be more generalizable, is that most D and D players that I have found in Adventure League do very little in investment in the world that they are in. Adventure League takes place in Faerun. Players do not really take the time to get to know the differences between moon and sun elves or anything else along those lines. It seems like that they are just there to roll dice. It is more fun when people actually invest themselves a bit in the world that they are playing in. That gives all the flavor.

I've only played one AL scenario, but based on my experiences with Pathfinder Society Organized Play, many players approach that kind of massive shared campaign with a different mindset than they would a home game.

For some, playing with an always-changing group of players and GMs makes it much harder for them to invest in the minutia of setting lore and character backstory. It's a very different play experience, and you don't get the same kind of continuity of character and place that can help reinforce such things in a home campaign.

Also, for people with busy schedules, occasional pick-up games at a store or con might be the only way they can game regularly. They may simply lack the time and energy to assimilate setting details the way that more frequent players can.

OTOH, OP scenarios can introduce players to elements of the setting that they might not have been aware of before. Golarion is huge, and highly detailed, but PFS has done a pretty solid job of providing adventures that showcase a wide variety of locations, plots, and enemies. For some players, the opening mission briefing and some knowledge checks will give them all the background they will ever need or care about (sometimes far more!), while others will get turned on by some setting detail, go read up about it between games, and maybe even build a whole new character around that nugget of lore. (I fall solidly in the second camp. I rarely use published settings in my home games, so I'm far from an expert on Golarion, but I do try to brush up on relevant setting lore when I'm GMing for PFS or creating a new PC for it.)


My college gaming group still gets together twice a year for our Weekend Away gaming event. During college we would vacate campus and go to one of our family's homes for a weekend a couple times a year, and we still do that at our own homes now. This time I will host as my wife and I are new homeowners.

I have also volunteered to GM a game, and will introduce 5e to the group (though 4 of us play weekly where we live). I have decided to run the Pathfinder Thornkeep mini campaign for them, and they are all in the process of making characters. I prefer to have a Session Zero but we like to jump right into the game when we all get settled, so I have asked those who don't have the books to utilize D&D Beyond for character generation. It will be a group of 9 this time, with one to be added in the future as he is not able to make it to this Weekend Away. I have gone through the module and beefed up encounters with more baddies, and recreated the end boss as its character class does not exist in 5e. Has anyone else played that adventure? I have only run it in Pathfinder, so I hope I am making the proper adjustments for such a large group.

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