How Magic and Psionics are funny when you really think about it.


Pathfinder RPG General Discussion


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This thread is basically for thsoe of us who have either thought about how a spell or power works, and realized that within the context of real life looking in some of this stuff is hilarious.

Example and True story. Back in 3.5 when the expanded psionics handbook came out, I decided to role a Psychic Warrior, i think we were around 8th or 9th level, I had bought a nice greatsword (my personal favorite weapon), and during the course of the game a monster or something sundered my greatsword, the DM was feeling pretty smug at moment, so on my next turn I used a power that I just so happened to have called "Call Weaponary", now originally I had got in for the off chance that i needed a ranged weapon, never thinking i'd need it for the express purpose of replacing my primary weapon. So I call forth another +1 greatsword, and the DM is like, "What the hell is that?! How?" I'm like "Call Weaponary says I can do this." thats when another player named Mike, chimed in, "Some where in the multiverse a Fighter who was charging in for an attack just realized his sword is now missing." We all shared a hearty laugh over that, and finished that particular encounter within the next few rounds.

^
That's an example of what I kind of mean by the topic. Please share any similiar insights into the awkwardness of magic that is magic and powers that we've all experienced.


Reminds me of The Death Gate Cycle's answer to why everybody of moderate means doesn't just use resurrection or reincarnation magic all over the place.


i had players who abused summoning and calling being called\summoned themselves.

a wild mage (back in 3.5) who had a wild surge when teleporting ended up cloning himself (for a time). instead of disappearing from here and popping there, he got the last part but messed the first.

when using a wish spell saying stuff like 'and' or sectioning off parts (like saying "me,him and her' or 'all 3 of us') require a wish for each. (since you wish for you to get this effect and you wish for him to get this effect and you wish for her... etc. same goes for wishing stuff like 'power,wisdom and immortality').
actually depending on the wish granter i might add more '&' that can be granted in one wish. (to show the power balance of different wish granters. as from the old Aladin story where the Jin in the ring was less powerful then the one in the lamp)


I was playing a rather serious Inquisitor in one campaign and had a specialization in Intimidation. Naturally, this led to choosing the spell "Blistering Invective", which let's me angrily insult people so hard they burst into flames. The best use I had of this was when a gargoyle grabbed me and flew off the ground. Still in the grip, I cast the spell successfully and scorched the Gargoyle and he dropped me. That was an image I always appreciated.


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I was playing a high level 3.0 game and we were facing off against a lich. The fight was going poorly for us as we were having trouble finding it (it was using a combination of vision obscuring spells) and hurting it for much damage.

I was playing a druid and so I had her summon in some xorns for their tremorsense and earth glide abilities. I specifically summoned elder xorns so that they would have a little more survivability. Anyway, I found the lich and was trying to figure out if the xorns could even do anything to it. While I was looking at the monster entry I noticed the line that talked about how tremendously heavy the things were (aprox. 9,000 lbs). I checked a few rules and then evilly declared that I had the xorn fall out of the ceiling on top of the lich. The reason is that the 3.0 falling damage rules state

Falling Objects wrote:
For each 200 pounds of an object’s weight, the object deals 1d6 points of damage, provided it falls at least 10 feet. Distance also comes into play, adding an additional 1d6 points of damage for every 10-foot increment it falls beyond the first

This meant that a xorn falling on you was doing something on the order of 50d6 physical damage. The DM ruled that the lich should get a reflex save since the xorn was acting as a falling object. This seemed fair and we all watched as the DM proceeded to roll a nat 1 for it's save. While the lich was obliterated (we still had to deal with it's phylactery) the xorn took a measly 5d6 falling damage which it easily survived.

The group found it hilarious that I had "xorned" it to death.


blahpers wrote:
Reminds me of The Death Gate Cycle's answer to why everybody of moderate means doesn't just use resurrection or reincarnation magic all over the place.

I dont suppose you'd be willing to share what it says, you can send it as a private message if you don't want to spoil it for anyone else.


Mako Senako wrote:
blahpers wrote:
Reminds me of The Death Gate Cycle's answer to why everybody of moderate means doesn't just use resurrection or reincarnation magic all over the place.
I dont suppose you'd be willing to share what it says, you can send it as a private message if you don't want to spoil it for anyone else.

Spoiler:

For every life you bring back, you kill someone else, somewhere else.


KahnyaGnorc wrote:
Mako Senako wrote:
blahpers wrote:
Reminds me of The Death Gate Cycle's answer to why everybody of moderate means doesn't just use resurrection or reincarnation magic all over the place.
I dont suppose you'd be willing to share what it says, you can send it as a private message if you don't want to spoil it for anyone else.
** spoiler omitted **

Considering how little the rich cared about the poor throughout most of history , even viewing them as 'less than people', I really don't see that little restriction stopping mass use of resurrection magic for the rich. Unless you couldn't choose the secondary target? Maybe?


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber
Natan Linggod 327 wrote:
KahnyaGnorc wrote:
Mako Senako wrote:
blahpers wrote:
Reminds me of The Death Gate Cycle's answer to why everybody of moderate means doesn't just use resurrection or reincarnation magic all over the place.
I dont suppose you'd be willing to share what it says, you can send it as a private message if you don't want to spoil it for anyone else.
** spoiler omitted **
Considering how little the rich cared about the poor throughout most of history , even viewing them as 'less than people', I really don't see that little restriction stopping mass use of resurrection magic for the rich. Unless you couldn't choose the secondary target? Maybe?

Not only couldn't they choose, IIRC it tended to hit the same kind of person, (i.e. raise an elf, kill an elf). Since the setup there had the truly powerful ruling class as a different, (and fairly limited in number), race, the same people who could benefit from resurrection magic would be the targets for the side effects.

Spoiler:
Of course, one group forgetting about this price and starting to use resurrection magic en masse resulted in enough randomly spread deaths to cause the whole carefully engineered system to break down.

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