Has anyone had a campaign where someone -passed- the Test of the Starstone?


Pathfinder RPG General Discussion


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I've done a bit of googling around but I haven't found any anecdotes of it. My rogue is daydreaming a bit about the whole Starstone thing and what it'd look like for her if she attempted and somehow passed it. I'll likely never really get an opportunity to seriously attempt it, and of course I'm exceedingly unlikely to pass anyway, but that just got me thinking if anybody HAS.

So whether it was you or one of your fellow players, or whether you were the DM and it was a player in your group... Has anyone passed it? And how did that story play out? What did they do with their newfound power?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

It's never happened in a game I've been a part of, but I do have an anecdote for you. Have you ever read the Tale of an Industrious Rogue?


I've always thought there should be an Adventure Path (presumably mythic) where, at the end the PCs can do the Starstone test and become gods if they win. (I assume you would retire the characters then, but they would be famous forever since they are now gods). Maybe 2e will have something like this.

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I am aware of one PFS module that allows a character to become a minor deity. That character must then retire, but the player can have a future character worship that deity. The player can then choose whatever domains and favored weapon he wants.

But I don't think Paizo will ever add a PC to their official pantheon. It could raise too many copyright issues.


The problem with the Test of the Starstone being a module is that it's individualistic. Even if they did create an adventure that takes a party or an individual through the Cathedral, the more important test, once the Starstone is touched, is a spiritual one. Who knows how long it lasts or what it consists of? There's no way to write it, and a DM would have to tailor it to the individual player. I'm not saying it couldn't be done, there's just an intangible element to it that I feel like shouldn't be codified.

And this is coming from someone who does see the endgame of one of their character to attempt it after her brother fails to return.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

There is a paucity of information on the Starstone. Mythic Realms is the only book with any info on it and what is there is scant at best. This is one area where Paizo either failed us as fans and consumers or they just have no intention of revealing more information. I consider that failing the fans as well.

"Starstone? Bah. How about this nice and shiny new Pathfinder edition instead?"


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Theconiel wrote:

I am aware of one PFS module that allows a character to become a minor deity. That character must then retire, but the player can have a future character worship that deity. The player can then choose whatever domains and favored weapon he wants.

But I don't think Paizo will ever add a PC to their official pantheon. It could raise too many copyright issues.

What module is this?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
PFRPGrognard wrote:

There is a paucity of information on the Starstone. Mythic Realms is the only book with any info on it and what is there is scant at best. This is one area where Paizo either failed us as fans and consumers or they just have no intention of revealing more information. I consider that failing the fans as well.

"Starstone? Bah. How about this nice and shiny new Pathfinder edition instead?"

Actually I think it is better for Piazo to never give details on the Starstone or the trials. Just like giving stats to deities, if you give too much information on the Starstone it cheapens the experience. It goes from something mythical to something that can be done.

Iron Gods AP actually has a way for the party to help a NPC become a god. This possibility is cannon for Starfinder, since it is one of the three deities that merged into one of the current Starfinder deities.

A player could never play a deity. It is never said why deities don't directly act in the world, but they don't. Probably because if they did there wouldn't be any need for us.

Pathfinder is a place for heroes to take center stage, not gods.

Sovereign Court

I'm making/running a game where the PCs are trying to stop a god from being made, but inadvertently get dragged in and take the Test themselves. I'm currently planning on having 10 tests with the PCs getting a mythic level after each successful test.


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Meirril wrote:
A player could never play a deity. It is never said why deities don't directly act in the world, but they don't. Probably because if they did there wouldn't be any need for us.

I have a go-to reason for that kind of thing: Overt action brings, and justifies, a response from other gods. Combine the likelihood of the response outweighing the initial action with the dangers of a possible escalation spiral, (and even that it's something that just isn't done), and you get something most of the gods will avoid doing.

Even most the nastier gods probably follow the 'rules' out of self interest. Rovagug might not, but there's a reason he's locked up.

(This also gives a reason for Mythic characters to not run around fixing things: They count as low-tier divine actors, they're fine so long as they stick to their 'fully mortal' concerns but if they start sticking their noses elsewhere they generate excuses for intervention.)


1 person marked this as a favorite.
PFRPGrognard wrote:

There is a paucity of information on the Starstone. Mythic Realms is the only book with any info on it and what is there is scant at best. This is one area where Paizo either failed us as fans and consumers or they just have no intention of revealing more information. I consider that failing the fans as well.

"Starstone? Bah. How about this nice and shiny new Pathfinder edition instead?"

I really don't think it helps Paizo any to open up the opportunity for "what's the lowest level wizard that can successfully pass the Test?" threads.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
Meirril wrote:
Actually I think it is better for Piazo to never give details on the Starstone or the trials. Just like giving stats to deities, if you give too much information on the Starstone it cheapens the experience.

I'd disagree, but I do understand your point. I think it's a setting plot-point that lacks sufficient information for anyone to use it in any meaningful way. To contrast, something like the mystery of Aroden's death, it's a simple enough concept that a GM who wants to can fabricate easily around it. A PC could be a member of a secret cabal that murdered Aroden, or could be a strange soul jar that contains Aroden's essence, or could have flashes of insight teasing at the idea that Aroden's prophecy ability isn't entirely destroyed but instead is spread out throughout the world.

The Starstone we have just enough details to not be able to easily invent around it. It's just a little too vague for many GMs to get traction on it.

Quote:
It goes from something mythical to something that can be done.

And that's the crux. The Starstone is a thing that can act. Mysteries like Aroden's demise are just background that can't be directly interacted with. The Starstone is the setting's biggest dangling bit of temptation. Most PCs in the world should wish to try it, even if they won't because of self-preservation. But if any of my PCs wanted to... I honestly wouldn't know how to begin, despite me being a pretty creative guy.

I'd've loved a nice 64-page+ book suggesting the form of different ways that the challenge could be run. Just frameworks of multiple approaches, from the best Paizo creative minds. Not necessarily an adventure with a single flowchart of "this is how it works", but instead a setting book with toolkit for DMs suggesting how such an adventure could work, leaving specific encounters up to us to fill in, so players wouldn't be able to read the book and know what framework we were running, or what specific challenges they'd deal with.

But tastes vary.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

To answer the OP's question, a few years ago I had a GM run a bunch of level 20 (I don't think it was mythic) one-shots for the Starstone test. I believe that none of the applicants succeeded, but I may be wrong. I never got around to running my lvl20 saurian druid named King Turok who genuinely believed he was a dinosaur who could wildshape into a humanoid.

Grand Lodge

If you stat out a test of the starstone, someone will cheese a way to easily beat it in a day, and in a week there will be 200 new deities on Golarian.

It was never meant to be something intended for players to be able to do.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

What nobody realizes: The 'test' of the Starstone actually absorbs the soul of everyone that attempts the 'test'. Once 1 billion gp worth of souls are absorbed the next being to touch the Starstone becomes a deity. Even a Wish won't help you tell when the Starstone is ready.

One in a thousand testers have a false souls inserted into their bodies. Released into the world to explore and gather information.

Liberty's Edge

Yqatuba wrote:
Theconiel wrote:

I am aware of one PFS module that allows a character to become a minor deity. That character must then retire, but the player can have a future character worship that deity. The player can then choose whatever domains and favored weapon he wants.

But I don't think Paizo will ever add a PC to their official pantheon. It could raise too many copyright issues.

What module is this?

Dunno. I think it's only available at conventions.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Mythic PFS scenario.

I'll spoiler the answer given to me by Tim Emrick.

Spoiler:
#5-16: Destiny of the Sands, Part 3: Sanctum of the Sages.
After playing part 2 (#5-15), the PCs are given Tier 3 mythic power for the duration of Part 3. The mythic rules are simplified down to two pages of rules and options for the PCs, but players who own MA are allowed to use that book to choose their powers.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
PFRPGrognard wrote:

Mythic PFS scenario.

I'll spoiler the answer given to me by Tim Emrick.

** spoiler omitted **

That scenario has nothing to do with the Starstone or becoming a deity. It's just a cool opportunity to play with temporary, low-tier mythic power, which you can't normally do at all in PFS.

(It's the third part of a trilogy that I intend to run for my group as an introduction to the mythic rules, before we start using them in my homebrew campaign.)


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Yqatuba wrote:
Theconiel wrote:

I am aware of one PFS module that allows a character to become a minor deity. That character must then retire, but the player can have a future character worship that deity. The player can then choose whatever domains and favored weapon he wants.

But I don't think Paizo will ever add a PC to their official pantheon. It could raise too many copyright issues.

What module is this?

Pretty sure it's

Spoiler:
The Rasping Rebirth

I've had an NPC pass the test and ascend. No players, though.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Card Game, Maps, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Deluxe Comics Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

We finished a 1-20 Starfinder campaign by passing the Starstone test. Our DM ran it pretty science-fictiony though, so the way he did it was not really terribly relevant to Pathfinder.


Heh. In a previous campaign, one of the possibilities was that the PCs would end up inadvertently discovering what really happens to creatures who "take the Test of the Starstone", but sadly it never came to be. Let's just say nobody really passes.


PFRPGrognard wrote:

There is a paucity of information on the Starstone. Mythic Realms is the only book with any info on it and what is there is scant at best. This is one area where Paizo either failed us as fans and consumers or they just have no intention of revealing more information. I consider that failing the fans as well.

"Starstone? Bah. How about this nice and shiny new Pathfinder edition instead?"

I consider it delicious fodder for enterprising GMs. Both the setting and the game are full of such deliberate ambiguities. The fate of Aroden is the foremost example of such a setting ambiguity, but the Test of the Starstone is certainly in the top ten.

Edit: Heh, should've finished the thread first. *hat tip to Meirril*

Anguish wrote:
The Starstone we have just enough details to not be able to easily invent around it. It's just a little too vague for many GMs to get traction on it.

For counterpoint, I can only gesture toward my previous post (and Meirril's most recent in the thread). It can definitely be done.


I hope Paizo never really provides much information on the Test of the Starstone and as a GM don't have the intention of ever letting players succeed in such a test. Becoming a deity is a story decision that GMs make, and generally speaking having a PC become a deity will not work in a GMs favor.

And even if they did allow it, that character definitely would become an NPC.


We should start a thread to spitball ideas for running our own Test of the Starstone.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
PFRPGrognard wrote:
We should start a thread to spitball ideas for running our own Test of the Starstone.

Ooh! Ooh! Can there be inkblots?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Modules Subscriber
blahpers wrote:
Anguish wrote:
The Starstone we have just enough details to not be able to easily invent around it. It's just a little too vague for many GMs to get traction on it.
For counterpoint, I can only gesture toward my previous post (and Meirril's most recent in the thread). It can definitely be done.

I don't really consider bait & switch to be good DM creativity, but absolutely get that tastes vary.

I mean, To Serve Man was a great Twilight Zone episode, but there's a difference to me between a one-hour passive black & white TV show and a man-hour interactive RPG session. And frankly these are how-to-not-pass-the-starstone ideas.

Our group keeps a coherent ongoing lore. The only problem I have with the Starstone in real play would be introducing four to six new deities (assuming everyone survived/passed). One is easy. And I suppose players who failed to pass might feel ripped off as their table-mates end up with canon deities over time. So maybe in those considerations this shouldn't happen. But it'd be nice to have the option.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Card Game, Maps, Modules, Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Deluxe Comics Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Anguish wrote:
Our group keeps a coherent ongoing lore. The only problem I have with the Starstone in real play would be introducing four to six new deities (assuming everyone survived/passed). One is easy. And I suppose players who failed to pass might feel ripped off as their table-mates end up with canon deities over time.

I had a loose plan for the PCs to be the first ever group to pass the test - as such there’s no precedent and my resolution to the problem you raise was going to be a multi-aspect deity similar to Starfinder’s Triune (with each PC responsible for one of the new deity’s domains).

Trying to put a scenario together, it always bugged me that nobody seemed to take any helpers along to attempt the test. Presumably that’s because it doesn’t work, so how can I justify a party of PCs all going in together?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Card Game, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

My current homebrew has the Starstone on the roadmap for plot reasons, and I intend the PCs to pass it, although I don’t plan on making it easy. For Steve’s question about helpers, I just assume that the Test scales the challenges accordingly to the number and type of people attempting the test. So more helpers = harder challenges. If bringing more people won’t make the Test easier, why bother with it?

For my PCs, I’m envisioning challenge types where they’re forced to split up as well, and each handles some aspect that is tailored to be difficult (but achievable) for their own character—letting them shine in areas that other PCs have typically covered in the past.


If I had to imagine anything for the Starstone test, I definitely wouldn't imagine the Starstone letting people take the test as a group. This is about proving that you're worthy to be a deity.

I didn't hear the story about how Cayden Cailean and his mates drunkenly wandered into the Starstone. Just Cayden.

Even if you attempted to enter together, I imagine the Starstone would separate you and give each person attempting their own separate challenge.


Way back in the day we were playing Advanced D&D at very high levels using aides provided by the Masters Rules boxed set and supporting adventures. The end goal of that game was to have the characters advance to demigod-hood. As such, I had individual challenges planned for the characters. Advancement to the divine was not something I considered to be group oriented.

The adventures they faced were designed for the group, of course, but then each had side quests and challenges designed to test their aptitude for ascendance. We never fully explored all of the challenges (college got in the way), but it was a fun thought experiment. I consider the Test of the Starstone to be very similar to those old experiences.


Anguish wrote:
blahpers wrote:
Anguish wrote:
The Starstone we have just enough details to not be able to easily invent around it. It's just a little too vague for many GMs to get traction on it.
For counterpoint, I can only gesture toward my previous post (and Meirril's most recent in the thread). It can definitely be done.

I don't really consider bait & switch to be good DM creativity, but absolutely get that tastes vary.

I mean, To Serve Man was a great Twilight Zone episode, but there's a difference to me between a one-hour passive black & white TV show and a man-hour interactive RPG session. And frankly these are how-to-not-pass-the-starstone ideas.

Our group keeps a coherent ongoing lore. The only problem I have with the Starstone in real play would be introducing four to six new deities (assuming everyone survived/passed). One is easy. And I suppose players who failed to pass might feel ripped off as their table-mates end up with canon deities over time. So maybe in those considerations this shouldn't happen. But it'd be nice to have the option.

An interesting way to handle a group Ascension would be to have them become a sort of gestalt deity. The Native Americans have their tales of the Twins and other such demigods.

Edit: Basically what Steve said.

Acquisitives

Claxon wrote:


I didn't hear the story about how Cayden Cailean and his mates drunkenly wandered into the Starstone. Just Cayden.

Look, If 3 halflings in a trench coat can take it and come out the god of murderers, thieves, and assassins, so can your adventuring party. :P

Dark Archive

Kyron "Death Knell" Shess wrote:
Look, If 3 halflings in a trench coat can take it and come out the god of murderers, thieves, and assassins, so can your adventuring party. :P

Four halflings! Blackfingers (alchemist), Reaper of Reputation (bard), Gray Master (rogue) and Father Skinsaw (barbarian).

Seriously though, I like the idea of a conjoined / gestalt / hive-mind deity. Nethys could be another example, being well-suited to a dualistic interpretation.

Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder RPG / General Discussion / Has anyone had a campaign where someone -passed- the Test of the Starstone? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.