Why is adamantine more powerful in Starfinder than in Pathfinder?


General Discussion


In Pathfinder, it ignores 20 points of hardness. In Starfinder, it ignores 30 instead. What's the deal?


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Turns out a more modern, industrial, high-tech take on metallurgy actually helps.

Also, different system, numbers mean different things. But still mostly the power of science.
I can guarantee you their steel is also better. It just doesn't have that dramatic of an effect.


Hadn't noticed that. And here i thought the starship walls were safe...


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Starship walls ARE safe.

Just about any weapon or sturdy piece of equipment of 13th-level or higher is safe from this supposed super adamantine.

Dark Archive

Given that every number in both systems is an abstraction it is an unnecessary assumption to assume that a hardness in 1 system directly tracks into the other.


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Everything gets harder as time goes on. Life, jobs, the damn cat... and metal.


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Pantshandshake wrote:
Everything gets harder as time goes on. Life, jobs, the damn cat... and metal.

Metallica is proof otherwise! HI YO!


I'm no Pathfinder expert but I know there are some here. How do items in general compare between systems in respect to HP and hardness? Do items have more hardness to ignore in Starfinder?


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There's really two ways I can see it being explained, since I don't know of any official reasoning:

1) Adamantine Alloy is, when compared to raw Adamantine, kind of like comparing Steel to raw Iron. Iron's good, but Steel is better, and likewise the Adamantine Alloy is more effective than raw Adamantine would be.

I think there's stuff that goes against that somewhere in one of the books though, so the other option:

2) It's a few thousand years past Pathfinder. Metal refining has gotten much better, allowing for metallurgists to work with something closer approaching Pure Adamantine than what their relatively primitive predecessors were using in Pathfinder days. And since by this time it should be relatively simple to examine the effects different elements have when alloyed with Adamantine, it should be simple enough to create an alloy that stretches Adamantine supplies as far as possible while still retaining that strength that the purer-than-Pathfinder-era Adamantine possesses.

The Exchange

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Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Imperial vs metric. Different numbers don't mean the thing being measured has changed.


Adamantine falls from the stars right?

Well now you can go to the stars and dig it up. No waiting.

Means it's feisible to put more adamantine in the alloy.

Dataphiles

I think that any in-game, lore explanation that you come up with will be a stretch and require some mental gymnastics.

I believe that the true explanation is from a design standpoint.

In Pathfinder the greatest non-magical substance is adamantine. It has a hardness of 20 and, by Pathfinder rules, the hardness of a substance a weapon is made out subtracts from the hardness of the object it is attacking. This allows a weapon made of adamantine to ignore the hardness of any nonmagical substance. This allows the destruction of walls to be an easy and quick process.

In Starfinder, as far as I have read, this is not the case. Materials' hardness cannot be overcome except by Penetrating weapons. This mechanics pretty much completely prevents an ease of going through walls (or things the story doesn't want you to).


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"Dr." Cupi wrote:
It has a hardness of 20 and, by Pathfinder rules, the hardness of a substance a weapon is made out subtracts from the hardness of the object it is attacking. This allows a weapon made of adamantine to ignore the hardness of any nonmagical substance.

...Pretty sure this isn't a thing, and Adamantine's ignoring 20 points of Hardness is unique to it.

Dataphiles

You are correct. I reread my own post and am confused how I came up with that.

Either way, I think the point that the designers don't want players to easily be able to go through walls (or doors) is still valid.

Also, the penetrating weapon quality is a joke as it works based on the item level.

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