DungeonmasterCal's House of Respite


Off-Topic Discussions

3,901 to 3,950 of 4,385 << first < prev | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | next > last >>

Yes, it is. But it's now something that has to be monitored, in addition to all her other things.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Happy HUMP DAAAAAAAAAAYYYY!!!

(SO ready for WInter Break to be here.)
;P


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Soooooo,...

Well,
TODAY I am setting the stage for this mornings Recital Hour, (college students performing for their peers) and I find a half-burnt cigarette butt on a carpeted choir riser.

Hm. We did have a large rehearsal last night (Christmas concert is tonight) But I'm fairly certain that no one was smoking during the rehearsal. ;P

I have no idea how it got there. They may have been smoking it outside, put it out, and carried it inside in a jacket pocket, and it fell out on stage during rehearsal. ??? Dunno.

But,... Come ON people!
Besides the campus being a 'Smoking NO-NO' zone, HOW are you in the performing arts (band and choir) and NOT KNOW that THEATER AND FIRE DO NOT MIX!!!!

*Sigh*

And again, I am not allowed to beat people senseless, no matter how much they may or may not deserve it.
Or even yell at them.

And they wonder WHY the Aged Wizzies' Bald Spot
Keeps.
Getting.
Bigger?!?

>_<

On the PLUS side, this job has driven me to drink.
Which is the one thing I am truly grateful to it for! ;P

<Goes home for lunch, does not return. Enjoys a couple of Hi-Octane Egg-Nogs as desert,...>. ;)


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Ragadolf wrote:
On the PLUS side, this job has driven me to drink.

I had a grad school colleague who used to open every class he taught by walking in and saying to the students: "Good morning, reasons I drink!"


quibblemuch wrote:
Ragadolf wrote:
On the PLUS side, this job has driven me to drink.
I had a grad school colleague who used to open every class he taught by walking in and saying to the students: "Good morning, reasons I drink!"

I like this guy already.

:)


7 people marked this as a favorite.

Back when I was teaching (college medieval lit), I'd explain medieval society in the following way:

"The medieval world was divided into three classes: The nobility, the clergy, and the serfs. The nobility are like the administration of this university. They have money, power, and nice houses. The clergy are the fancy professors with their gowns, tenure, and actual offices & working printers."

"Does that mean we're the serfs?" some student would inevitably ask.

"No. The serfs--the poor dumb bastards who actually do all the work that keeps the thing going--that's us graduate students."

"Well then who are we?"

"You're the horde of rampaging barbarians that periodically sweeps across the landscape and trashes everything."


3 people marked this as a favorite.

That pretty much sums it all up.

Sorry I haven't been posting much lately. I'm in the process of putting myself back together after a month of crippling depression. While nothing I post is of world-shaking importance, I just feel I need to participate more, especially in a thread that I started. I'm getting there.


Hi, everyone!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Howdy, John!


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I'm getting there.

Baby steps.

Even if you just post once a day, it gives you a chance to check in on this community that you started.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

*Sigh* Getting ready for day surgery tomorrow to fix a hernia. I expect to be grumpy for the next week...


2 people marked this as a favorite.

HRRRGH!

Flipping For Those Who Can't


3 people marked this as a favorite.
DungeonmasterCal wrote:

That pretty much sums it all up.

Sorry I haven't been posting much lately. I'm in the process of putting myself back together after a month of crippling depression. While nothing I post is of world-shaking importance, I just feel I need to participate more, especially in a thread that I started. I'm getting there.

Sorry to hear it, Cal. Depression f~&$ing sucks. But good job hanging on. And keep posting--we're all in this together*.

*Except dolphins. With their smug grins and chipper demeanors. They're not fooling anyone...


4 people marked this as a favorite.

Also: Oh crap. Monkey Santa got free.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories, PF Special Edition, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

@Cal: It does indeed suck. Hang in there. It will pass.

@quibblemuch: oh, man, are you in trouble now!


6 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Ed Reppert wrote:
@Cal: It does indeed suck. Hang in there. It will pass.

And come back. And pass again.

Fortunately, those of use who cope with depression are not always at the bottom of the pit at the same time. Let us reach out a hand when you're too far down and help you get started upwards again.

Or just keep squeezing your hand so you know we're still here.

Baby steps.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Feros wrote:
*Sigh* Getting ready for day surgery tomorrow to fix a hernia. I expect to be grumpy for the next week...

Ugh. Surgery. :P

Few years ago now, I had a surgery to remove a tumor, (Kidney cancer, get it out!) I go back for a follow up and they say, 'Hey, didn't your belly button used to be an innie? You have a hernia. We need to go back in and fix it.'

I told the doc, 'C'mon, are you just looking for excuses to get me back in the surgery center and get more money?!?' ;P

I prefer to be the caretaker. I hate being the patient. Because I am a SUCKY patient. It makes me cranky. -_-

Both surgeries I spent 1 week or so sitting on the couch, (I became very good at getting up and down without using my stomach muscles!) ;P

BE the Grumpy dwarf! Enjoy your enforced time off!
And get better soon! ;)


1 person marked this as a favorite.
DungeonmasterCal wrote:

That pretty much sums it all up.

Sorry I haven't been posting much lately. I'm in the process of putting myself back together after a month of crippling depression. While nothing I post is of world-shaking importance, I just feel I need to participate more, especially in a thread that I started. I'm getting there.

Sorry to hear that Cal. Feel better soon!

SOMEone has to keep this group of reprobates in line on this thread!
;P

Happy Weekend! :)


3 people marked this as a favorite.
quibblemuch wrote:
Also: Oh crap. Monkey Santa got free.

Ooooooo Snap!

Quick! Where do you keep the backup stash of 'Emergency Bribery Bannana Brandy'?!?!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
quibblemuch wrote:

Back when I was teaching (college medieval lit), I'd explain medieval society in the following way:

"The medieval world was divided into three classes: The nobility, the clergy, and the serfs. The nobility are like the administration of this university. They have money, power, and nice houses. The clergy are the fancy professors with their gowns, tenure, and actual offices & working printers."

"Does that mean we're the serfs?" some student would inevitably ask.

"No. The serfs--the poor dumb bastards who actually do all the work that keeps the thing going--that's us graduate students."

"Well then who are we?"

"You're the horde of rampaging barbarians that periodically sweeps across the landscape and trashes everything."

I love it.

And it fits SO many things. But Universities most of all.
Yes,...


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Ragadolf wrote:
Feros wrote:
*Sigh* Getting ready for day surgery tomorrow to fix a hernia. I expect to be grumpy for the next week...

Ugh. Surgery. :P

Few years ago now, I had a surgery to remove a tumor, (Kidney cancer, get it out!) I go back for a follow up and they say, 'Hey, didn't your belly button used to be an innie? You have a hernia. We need to go back in and fix it.'

I told the doc, 'C'mon, are you just looking for excuses to get me back in the surgery center and get more money?!?' ;P

I prefer to be the caretaker. I hate being the patient. Because I am a SUCKY patient. It makes me cranky. -_-

Both surgeries I spent 1 week or so sitting on the couch, (I became very good at getting up and down without using my stomach muscles!) ;P

BE the Grumpy dwarf! Enjoy your enforced time off!
And get better soon! ;)

Thanks! Out of surgery and, as predicted, feeling grumpy. Can't talk properly as they put a tube down my throat. Bleah!

Up here in Canada, surgery is free, so no bonus cash for repeat ops. One less thing to worry about...and I'm on dilaudid, so not completely bad. :)

I will enjoy my enforced time off as best I can, but since I'm part-time/casual in the winter anyway, there isn't much different than other years except Employment Insurance won't expect me to look for work.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Well get better quick!

happy weekend all,
I'm off to run a show, a dance company wants to do "The Cajun Nutcracker"

I fear, for so many possibilities,....


5 people marked this as a favorite.

I’m picturing the Rat King making his entrance on a big old fan boat and it is GLORIOUS.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

1 person marked this as a favorite.
quibblemuch wrote:

Back when I was teaching (college medieval lit), I'd explain medieval society in the following way:

"The medieval world was divided into three classes: The nobility, the clergy, and the serfs. The nobility are like the administration of this university. They have money, power, and nice houses. The clergy are the fancy professors with their gowns, tenure, and actual offices & working printers."

"Does that mean we're the serfs?" some student would inevitably ask.

"No. The serfs--the poor dumb bastards who actually do all the work that keeps the thing going--that's us graduate students."

"Well then who are we?"

"You're the horde of rampaging barbarians that periodically sweeps across the landscape and trashes everything."

That is brilliant, except...

<pedantic>The nobility in the medieval ages were "Those Who Fight." (The division was referred to Those Who Fight, Those Who Work, Those Who Pray.) Now of course, a lot of low level serfs were roped into serving in armies. The nobility were the officers of the military. But they were usually expected to actually fight. And plan the tactics against the raging barbarians.

I suppose the administration "fights" with the occasional ethics reviews and investigations of bad behavior and the like... board and charging tuition and whatnot, but mostly they just hide away and let the faculty handle it. In fairness, there are a lot of things to keep running and it can be hard work in its own way... but I'm not sure if they are "those who fight." More just lucky to be in hereditary positions.

I also love that we, the University staff, who in reality keep everything running smoothly behind the scenes, don't even get a mention. Technically also "those who work," though fully admittedly in a more secure and better paid state than serfdom. We are of course the noble's house servants, and equally invisible and forgettable (but with paid benefits at least). And often we are caught in the middle of battles between barbarians, serfs, clergy, and nobles all the way around!
</pedantic>


DeathQuaker wrote:
quibblemuch wrote:

Back when I was teaching (college medieval lit), I'd explain medieval society in the following way:

"The medieval world was divided into three classes: The nobility, the clergy, and the serfs. The nobility are like the administration of this university. They have money, power, and nice houses. The clergy are the fancy professors with their gowns, tenure, and actual offices & working printers."

"Does that mean we're the serfs?" some student would inevitably ask.

"No. The serfs--the poor dumb bastards who actually do all the work that keeps the thing going--that's us graduate students."

"Well then who are we?"

"You're the horde of rampaging barbarians that periodically sweeps across the landscape and trashes everything."

That is brilliant, except...

<pedantic>The nobility in the medieval ages were "Those Who Fight." (The division was referred to Those Who Fight, Those Who Work, Those Who Pray.) Now of course, a lot of low level serfs were roped into serving in armies. The nobility were the officers of the military. But they were usually expected to actually fight. And plan the tactics against the raging barbarians.

I suppose the administration "fights" with the occasional ethics reviews and investigations of bad behavior and the like... board and charging tuition and whatnot, but mostly they just hide away and let the faculty handle it. In fairness, there are a lot of things to keep running and it can be hard work in its own way... but I'm not sure if they are "those who fight." More just lucky to be in hereditary positions.

I also love that we, the University staff, who in reality keep everything running smoothly behind the scenes, don't even get a mention. Technically also "those who work," though fully admittedly in a more secure and better paid state than serfdom. We are of course the noble's house servants, and equally invisible and forgettable (but with paid benefits at least). And often we are caught in the middle of battles between barbarians,...

So you are a burgher?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
quibblemuch wrote:
I’m picturing the Rat King making his entrance on a big old fan boat and it is GLORIOUS.

Nope.

Although the Nutcracker and Clara DO ride in a pirot. (Think low sided, hand carved canoe) through a swamp.
;P

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Drejk wrote:
So you are a burgher?

No, because we are still entirely reliant upon the "nobility" for our livelihood. Burghers would be the independent contractors that work with the university, e.g., lab supplies sales and caterers, etc.


DeathQuaker wrote:
quibblemuch wrote:

Back when I was teaching (college medieval lit), I'd explain medieval society in the following way:

"The medieval world was divided into three classes: The nobility, the clergy, and the serfs. The nobility are like the administration of this university. They have money, power, and nice houses. The clergy are the fancy professors with their gowns, tenure, and actual offices & working printers."

"Does that mean we're the serfs?" some student would inevitably ask.

"No. The serfs--the poor dumb bastards who actually do all the work that keeps the thing going--that's us graduate students."

"Well then who are we?"

"You're the horde of rampaging barbarians that periodically sweeps across the landscape and trashes everything."

That is brilliant, except...

<pedantic>The nobility in the medieval ages were "Those Who Fight." (The division was referred to Those Who Fight, Those Who Work, Those Who Pray.) Now of course, a lot of low level serfs were roped into serving in armies. The nobility were the officers of the military. But they were usually expected to actually fight. And plan the tactics against the raging barbarians.

I suppose the administration "fights" with the occasional ethics reviews and investigations of bad behavior and the like... board and charging tuition and whatnot, but mostly they just hide away and let the faculty handle it. In fairness, there are a lot of things to keep running and it can be hard work in its own way... but I'm not sure if they are "those who fight." More just lucky to be in hereditary positions.

I also love that we, the University staff, who in reality keep everything running smoothly behind the scenes, don't even get a mention. Technically also "those who work," though fully admittedly in a more secure and better paid state than serfdom. We are of course the noble's house servants, and equally invisible and forgettable (but with paid benefits at least). And often we are caught in the middle of battles between barbarians,...

looks at comment

looks at L5R book

looks at comment

Hey...

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

Freehold DM wrote:

looks at comment

looks at L5R book

looks at comment

Hey...

It's been a billion years since I played L5R; I am sadly missing the reference. I mainly remember playing a character who in the first session got bisected so I then played her twin sister.


Variations about the similar social stratification are common across the Earth (and thus also reflected in fiction).

In Legend Of Five Rings which is based on an anachronistic mix of Japanese society, the social strata are:

Kuge, the high nobility of the Imperial Court, though now also including high-tier land-owners across the Empire. They are the ones who rule, and own land (de facto, as de iure all land belongs to the emperor). They are not supposed to fight, technically, but in practice a land-owner has to command his men in war, so knowing how to fight is both practical and necessary.

Buke, the warriors of the empire, aka saumrai. Those are those who fight, and they are the ones who often hold and administer the land, nominally in the name of the kuge and emperor, though in practice the later might have hard time exercising their ownership.

Heimin, or half-people. They are the bulk of the population, those who work in some way. Unlike in Western societies, monks are considered part of this layer of society, though they are sort of special case, as they often include retired members of the higher social groups. Farmers are considered the highest non-monk layer, as they grow the food—which is considered the most pure form of work (which is in itself unclean to a degree), as process of creation (and in Rokugani pre-modern economic theory, the source of wealth held by higher castes). Below them are the craftsmen (though armor and weapon-crafting blacksmiths, because of their value to military are de facto treated better than anyone else). At the bottom are merchants whose whole virtue is "merely" moving resources and processed things around (which is considered less virtuous than harvesting or shaping things).

And then there is a fourth group that represent those excluded from the Celestial Order:

Hinin, the non-people, which includes ritually untouchables, but also people who are performing unworthy works, such as geisha and other entertainers, and criminals.

Notably, the concept of strictly hereditary hinin developed quite late in historical Japan, while Legend Of Five Rings happily adopted very late concepts and presented them as ancient Rokugani tradition.


DeathQuaker wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:

looks at comment

looks at L5R book

looks at comment

Hey...

It's been a billion years since I played L5R; I am sadly missing the reference. I mainly remember playing a character who in the first session got bisected so I then played her twin sister.

you were almost quoting things verbatim there, and it was amazing to see that you were NOT referencing the books intentionally.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

LOL! I was actually quoting my medieval lit teacher from grad school. A lot of medieval societies had--on a very broad level--similar class strata. Thanks for clarifying. (Although I WAS also playing L5R while I was in grad school so I'm surprised I didn't draw more of a connection.)


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Monster: Tristag. More magical beasts.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Cajun Nutcracker time.

We had ONE run through yesterday. Finally.

NOoooooo problem. Easy-peezy.

<CHugs coffee, wishes he had MORE hair left to pull on/out>

;P


Drejk wrote:
Monster: Tristag. More magical beasts.

I wish I had your gift for monster creation!


DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Monster: Tristag. More magical beasts.
I wish I had your gift for monster creation!

Eh, half of the time it's result of frantic realization it is Sunday already an I haven't written a word of planned short story so I need to make something quickly to keep the streak of regular posts going.

Not quite today, as today's monster was mostly written yesterday evening (i.e. today when the night was waning) based on a picture of some deer (huh, deer is the same in plural as in singular?) going in a line and looking to the side looking like a single deer with three heads that I saw earlier this week.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

To put it bluntly. When there is a monster or NPC on the blog, there is 50%-75% chance that it's sign of my failure to write anything more complex and demanding over the week...

The remaining chance is that I had an idea and I wanted to put it to the writing...

Except when I do monster/NPC weeks with a post a day. Then I am just challenging myself to do daily series.


How ever you happen to do it always has great results. And yes, the plural of deer is "deer".


3 people marked this as a favorite.

I have so many short stories waiting... But instead of writing them down, they linger in my head, some of them for years now...


Drejk wrote:

To put it bluntly. When there is a monster or NPC on the blog, there is 50%-75% chance that it's sign of my failure to write anything more complex and demanding over the week...

The remaining chance is that I had an idea and I wanted to put it to the writing...

Except when I do monster/NPC weeks with a post a day. Then I am just challenging myself to do a series with post a day.

that's why I do empire today.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories, PF Special Edition, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

The plural of goose is geese, the plural of moose is... moose.
The plural of mouse is mice, the plural of house is ... houses.

English is weird. :-)


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Tell me about it...


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Wow. After that game, I wouldn’t be surprised if the officiating crew turned up floating in Boston Harbor, covered in banana-shaped bruises...


As long as they are picking on SOMEone besides the Saints! >_<

(Yes. Those down south, even those of us who normally do not watch the ball of foots, are still 'salty' over that 'no call'.) ;P


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Ed Reppert wrote:

The plural of goose is geese, the plural of moose is... moose.

The plural of mouse is mice, the plural of house is ... houses.

English is weird. :-)

Yes.

Yes it is.

How is it best described?

"Other languages borrow words from other languages. English does not 'borrow'. It follows other languages down dark alleys, knocks them unconscious, and rifles through their pockets for loose grammar'."

;P


9 people marked this as a favorite.

So we're having a gingerbread house contest in homeroom. My kids decided to go for "tallest."

Student: looks at tower ...Ms. Scint? What's that word from Greek theatre stuff where the characters are really convinced they're all that, and then stuff goes down?
Me: Hubris?
Student: Yeah, that's it. That's what that tower makes me think of.
five minutes later, it falls over


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Monkey Santa wrote:
Tell me about it...

I believe that the plural Monkey Santa is looking for is 'Chives'

Shadow Lodge

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Scintillae wrote:

So we're having a gingerbread house contest in homeroom. My kids decided to go for "tallest."

Student: looks at tower ...Ms. Scint? What's that word from Greek theatre stuff where the characters are really convinced they're all that, and then stuff goes down?
Me: Hubris?
Student: Yeah, that's it. That's what that tower makes me think of.
five minutes later, it falls over

I mean, they're not wrong.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Orthos wrote:
Scintillae wrote:

So we're having a gingerbread house contest in homeroom. My kids decided to go for "tallest."

Student: looks at tower ...Ms. Scint? What's that word from Greek theatre stuff where the characters are really convinced they're all that, and then stuff goes down?
Me: Hubris?
Student: Yeah, that's it. That's what that tower makes me think of.
five minutes later, it falls over

I mean, they're not wrong.

There were definitely worse options they could have (and let's face it, did) come up with than hubris to describe that.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Vanykrye wrote:
Orthos wrote:
Scintillae wrote:

So we're having a gingerbread house contest in homeroom. My kids decided to go for "tallest."

Student: looks at tower ...Ms. Scint? What's that word from Greek theatre stuff where the characters are really convinced they're all that, and then stuff goes down?
Me: Hubris?
Student: Yeah, that's it. That's what that tower makes me think of.
five minutes later, it falls over

I mean, they're not wrong.
There were definitely worse options they could have (and let's face it, did) come up with than hubris to describe that.

Heh,

THAT is actually kind of awesome.
I think you must be doing something right Scint. ;)

3,901 to 3,950 of 4,385 << first < prev | 74 | 75 | 76 | 77 | 78 | 79 | 80 | 81 | 82 | 83 | 84 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Gamer Life / Off-Topic Discussions / DungeonmasterCal's House of Respite All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.