Do you like or dislike anime themes in Pathfinder?


Pathfinder RPG General Discussion


I ask because the one and only time I brought up something even close to anime on this site, I got heavily ridiculed and told how anime was “awful” with heaviliy faulty arguments (they were faulty because those same arguments were things Pathfinder not only does, but does to more of a ridiculous extreme, like “oh they can get shot off a skyscraper with a gun and not die”, even though you can get shot out of orbit and hit the ground and only take 20 points of damage in Pathfinder, for example).

So how do you feel about anime themes in Pathfinder?


I mean, Pathfinders just a system. What you do with it is up to you and the other people at your table.
The guys at my table are all mild to moderate weebs so we have a tendency to add some anime flair to our games but I've also played at tables that preferred to play it more "straight" for lack of a better term.
If you and yours wanna crank the anime up to 11 then no power on this board can or should stop you.
If youre looking for a game that really leans in to the anime flavor though, I highly recommend Anima: Beyond Fantasy. That game starts with level 1 characters being able to fly, walk through walls, and punch peoples heads clean off and it only gets more bonkers from there.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

What accounts for an anime theme? Thing is, anime is a huge and varied genre which contains almost any trope or theme you can think of. Pathfinder is a huge kitchen sink of an rpg which can theoretically contain any trope or theme you can think of.


I don't like anime. AT ALL. So in my games, I don't like anime themes or anime-ish characters, and make it a point to inform the rare new player that those themes are not welcome or appropriate at our table.


djdust wrote:
What accounts for an anime theme? Thing is, anime is a huge and varied genre which contains almost any trope or theme you can think of. Pathfinder is a huge kitchen sink of an rpg which can theoretically contain any trope or theme you can think of.

I can only assume, but I think what he means is something like shonen (I think that's the term) anime where there's lots of action and characters tend to be on the badass, if not superpowered, spectrum.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Reksew_Trebla wrote:
So how do you feel about anime themes in Pathfinder?

I feel . . . like this question is incoherent.

What qualifies as an "anime theme"? Are you asking me how I feel about cringe comedy in Pathfinder games, a la No Matter How I Look at It, It's You Guys' Fault I'm Not Popular? I must say I prefer the game without.

Are you asking me how I feel about friendship and loyalty in the game, a la One Piece? Beats playing with a party of murderhobos by a long sea-mile, says I.

Are you asking me how I feel about intrigue and overtly overly complicated schemes, a la Deathnote? Depends on the campaign, I suppose, and I find that it takes a good DM. As I usually DM, and, alas, am not supremely competent at it, my games are sadly without.

Are you asking me how I feel about character driven narratives, a la Neon Genesis Evangelion? It's my preference, but it has little to do with the rules of the game.

Are you asking whether Pathfinder should include firearms in it's default setting, a la the legendary Trigun? I think firearms in Pathfinder 1.0 could certainly have been better balanced, and I somewhat dislike their inexplicable prevalence in the hands of PCs far from the Mana Wastes.

Are you asking whether Paizo should take their cues from contemporary and classic battle shonen, in regards to Pathfinder's combat simulator?

If so, perhaps you should ask that?


The only anime thing I'm aware of in PF is the Magical Child archetype. That's terrible, though it's mostly a case of poor archetype design that had its one saving grace (could have Improved Familiar Mauler) destroyed by Ultimate Wilderness for no reason.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Anime is best understood as a medium for content. It has children's series, mature series, stuff for boys, stuff for girls, science, action, fantasy, sci-fi, comedy, romance, drama, mystery, horror... I mean, you name a genre, and there's probably at least one anime including it. Saying "anime is bad" is more like saying "movies are bad" than "these specific tropes are bad".

Besides, characters with superhuman abilities aren't exactly limited to anime. Comic Books, Superheroes, and various fantasy series have contributed quite a lot.

Dark Archive

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

This is one of those "Guys guys, anime is a medium not a genre" conversations :P

Like, people who say they hate anime are reaaaaaaaaaaaaaaally unclear about what they mean. Its like saying "I hate comic books" which is really hard to understand since "So wait, you hate newspaper strips, superhero comics, Donald Duck comics, Asterix & Obelix, Tintin, all other european comics(majority of Donald Duck comics seems to be from European artists since he is much more popular character here) I'm too lazy to list, etc and all in total, or you also hate every comic including webcomics and manga too? Or did you mean you hate one of those listed things?"

Dagnabbit, I got ninja'd by one second by post that says pretty much same thing :D

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Well anyway, to have something different to say on the matter, I think "anime themes" is really misunderstood concept among people in general.

Like Cú Chulainn's legend is one of most anime myths I have heard of :P So is Beowolf's as well. And... Yeah I'm not gonna finish the joke, thing is lot of stories about legendary heroes and their deeds actually really fit anime even at their most over the top format. Lot of things people complain about anime in Internet are much older and not invented by artists in the medium. Heck the Journey to the West is a Chinese novel published in the 16th century and it is pretty much the epitome of adventure action anime about group of misfits on a quest.

There is also that 60s/70s/80s/90s/2000s anime are really really really different things. And thats not even getting into stuff like "So does Japanese animated french/german/spanish/inserteuropeancountrieshere productions like Alfred J. Kwak and Around the World with Willy Fog technically count as anime? If they don't count, then why do some people count that Dutch-Japanese production about Moomins, based on swedish-finnish author's books and comic strips, as anime?"

(heck its kinda confusing to speak of Anime and Animation as separate mediums because anime is just term referring to Japanese animation and tropes :P And thats not even getting into Avatar the Last Air Bender, You could very well make good argument that Gargoyles or Thundercats cartoon could count as anime if you really wanted to)

Like, only thing that you can really speak of as anime "thing" is cost cutting methods used to make cheap budget wise animation look cool and stuff related to cultural differences, the over the top action itself isn't anime unique thing. Heck most of super hero comics are more over the top than majority of anime.


True. I used the word ‘genre’ in my post, but anime is more than a genre, it is trans-genre. Yet is not quite a medium either, for there can be anime series or movies, and there is western animation, and eastern-bloc animation, and middle-eastern animation, etc. So it’s a regional style of animation? And even that classification is blurred considering the heavy influence Japanese animation has had on American animation due to its popularity, and further confounded by the fact that the visual styles usually recognized as ‘anime’ are borrowed directly from manga (which is a regional style of comic book) and those visual styles are then again borrowed directly by some (not all) Japanese video games.

Uh this is all besides the point. The point is, there is no theme that belongs specifically to anime. If I want an alien who was sent to Golarion to destroy it but then got bonked on the head and forgot who he was and was raised by polite farmers who goes on to learn that he has powers beyond normal humans and then fights off an invading force of the very alien race to whom he belongs in my game, I have every right to do so, and so do you.

... oh wait.

...that’s Superman.


djdust wrote:


Uh this is all besides the point. The point is, there is no theme that belongs specifically to anime. If I want an alien who was sent to Golarion to destroy it but then got bonked on the head and forgot who he was and was raised by polite farmers who goes on to learn that he has powers beyond normal humans and then fights off an invading force of the very alien race to whom he belongs in my game, I have every right to do so, and so do you.

... oh wait.

...that’s Superman.

No it isn't? Superman wasn't sent to earth to destroy it, never suffered any head trauma (he was a baby upon landing), and Krypton, being blown up wasn't going to be leading any invasions for a very long time in comics history unless you consider Zod to be a one man invasion.

10 yard penalty for stretching


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Zod is a one man invasion as much as Vegeta is. Point is, things get borrowed and reused. Every poet is a cannibal and every artist a thief. There is no new thing under the sun.


If you don't think anime and Pathfinder work together I'd suggest watching Record of the Lodoss War. This is a short anime series that looks like it was lifted straight from old school D&D.

Now if you are talking about JRPG trophs...I don't like them. Guilds stop being professional organizations and instead become a clearing house for training and managing monster hunters. And you have to have a ridiculous population of monsters around to support such a professional organization. Dungeons act like a video game with infinite respawns of the monsters and whatever resources you gain that makes hunting said monster worthwhile. Then there is the infamous Bulletin Board that has all sorts of quests and rewards posted. Because adventuring is all of a sudden some regulated enterprise and you're certified to wander around doing the murder hobo thing except with rules.

That is so far away from traditional D&D story telling that I feel like it doesn't belong in Pathfinder at all. Seriously, its just bad and lazy story telling. Having an "Adventurer's Guild" is just unhealthy for a campaign. Especially when you start to imply that there are other groups of heros around that are more capable than the players because that naturally leads to the question: why don't we get these more powerful adventurers to save the world (village/us) instead of us?


Meirril wrote:
If you don't think anime and Pathfinder work together I'd suggest watching Record of the Lodoss War. This is a short anime series that looks like it was lifted straight from old school D&D.

It was based on an actual D&D campaign, is what I heard.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Every time I see someone whining about "I don't like anime in my medieval fantasy" I can almost always find a european myth that goes even more over the top with it, while also finding plenty of examples about how far most campaign setting diverge from "medieval" without even taking the existence of magic into account.


I seriously wonder if people who claim something is "too anime" can name more than Dragon Ball (Z), Pokemon, Sailor Moon and maybe Gundam and Yu-gi-oh.

Besides, if くいっく・すたーと!! ever got an anime, everything in a tabletop RPG would be anime.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Just to note though that anime by definition can't be a genre since genre is much stricter category. Like, Western genre has to somehow be in Wild West or at least use aesthetics of Wild West in another location, you can't have Western genre story without the whole gunslingers and crap, if you are trying to make western with swords instead of guns, only way that would count is that if it was cowboys and sheriffs wielding swords in normal western location otherwise :P Like if you replace gunslingers with samurai and make setting Japan, thats clearly samurai story instead of western one.

Art medium on otherhand is merely a material and method used to communicate the artistic idea to audience. So anime is a medium regardless of whether it is in movie or tv show form.

Either way, pretty much all Adventure Paths would work as an anime series without really changing anything about them. Heck pathfinder mechanics, whether at higher or lower levels, aren't out of the place either.

(just to note though, only thing that really separates western and eastern animation is the methods commonly used in animation(such as the budget cutting methods or how certain ideas like comedy is visualized), you could argue that anime prefers to have overarcing plot while western cartoons more often than not have episodic structure, but even that isn't completely true, there are anime in episodic structure that you can watch in any order and plot driven cartoons. Art style itself isn't defining factor, you can have anime that looks visually identical to western cartoons.)


deuxhero wrote:

I seriously wonder if people who claim something is "too anime" can name more than Dragon Ball (Z), Pokemon, Sailor Moon and maybe Gundam and Yu-gi-oh.

Besides, if くいっく・すたーと!! ever got an anime, everything in a tabletop RPG would be anime.

I genuinely believe that, at the moment, pokemon is too based in anime for me. It's an RPG with a deep and complex battle system, they don't need to dumb it down just because their "main character" is a complete idiot.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
CorvusMask wrote:
Either way, pretty much all Adventure Paths would work as an anime series without really changing anything about them. Heck pathfinder mechanics, whether at higher or lower levels, aren't out of the place either.

That's true, but lots of anime wouldn't work as Adventure Paths. Then again, lots of anime wouldn't work as other anime.

If Spike in Cowboy Bebop suddenly started screaming and powered up, then launched an energy beam from his buttocks that destroyed the planet that Vicious was on, that doesn't fit in the story.

Similarly, in Assassination Classroom, people who aren't Koro-sensei don't randomly fly around at Mach 5.

In Death Note, it would be pretty stupid if Light could punch so hard that it parted the clouds from Japan to India.

In Neon Genesis Evangelion, Shinji (or any of the other Eva pilots, or any human) can't kill Angels barehanded because of the intense physical training they've undergone.

deuxhero wrote:
I seriously wonder if people who claim something is "too anime" can name more than Dragon Ball (Z), Pokemon, Sailor Moon and maybe Gundam and Yu-gi-oh.

"Too anime" is a kludgy way to put it, but the idea it's getting across is reasonable. For any fantasy world, you want a set of rules that the world obeys. People who complain about options being "too anime" are generally complaining about over the top options that break the laws of physics without a reasonable in-universe explanation.

Hence, I highly doubt that many would complain about options from The Ancient Magus' Bride showing up in Pathfinder. Similarly, the world of Black Clover probably wouldn't bother them (outside of magic, people behave as expected). Neither would (I suspect) giving characters the physical abilities of people from Danmachi, Darker Than Black, or (for a non-fantasy) Attack on Titan, or Samurai Champloo, or Code Geass.

But people don't come on the forums advocating that. They want their non-magical characters to have the abilities of characters from Hunter x Hunter (actually, probably too low power), or One Piece (probably also too low power), or Bleach, or One Punch Man (Saitama's power level, from what I can tell, is one of the major running jokes in the series, but hey, let's ignore that). It's major Power Fantasy stuff. Stand on the air just because I'm badass. Slice through spacetime with my sword and teleport where I want to because I can swing my sword so hard. Blow away mountains when I parry your attack because I've become so powerful (in fact, I'm now so powerful that you can no longer sense my reiatsu and don't realize how outclassed you are!). Destroy a city by punching it. Catch a lightning bolt with my teeth and use it to lasso a tornado, which I then turn into my mount.

People react to that and say "it's too anime!" And they're simultaneously wrong and right to do so.

Me personally, I want non-magical classes to have some grounding in the physics of the real world, though they don't have to be rigorously tied to it. I don't, for example, want a Fighter to be able to pick up two towers and swing them around as weapons, decimating entire armies. Nor do I think a Fighter should be able to Leap from Varisia to Absalom in a single bound. But hey, that just proves my closed-mindedness and lack of vision (and that I want to screw over Fighters), right?


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Depends on what's meant.
I think Guts from Berserk is probably the closest thing to a high level Pathfinder fighter(or Barbarian) you will see in Fiction.

One of my currents character is a chaotic good pirate, who often acts like a Shonen hero being exited to fight strong and often being dumb as a rock in everyday situations. One Piece is certainely an inspiration here.
I certainely prefer rule of cool characters over historical accuracte ones.

I don't like those 1000-year-old-vampire-loli or brooding egdy trechcoat-dual-katana-guy special snowflake characters some anime fans tend to make.

I definately don't want most of Anime comedy in my Pathfinder games. I find it cringe and would gladly skip it in the Anime's I like as well.

Now do I want some superhuman wushu in high level martials. I would say a little. Some cartoonish speed and acrobatics would be cool for all fighty types at higher levels. Learning to shoot energy beams or flying around should also be possible to learn for them. This is however a slippery slope. Allowing such over the top feats without restrictions often eliminates concepts more grounded in reality. If everybody picks Beast Totem because it's best, all Barbarians are suddenly transformed into some weird pseudo-werewolves, whose hands become claws whenever angry. Therefore I think, while Anime stuff is cool, it is more important to give out strong abilities that help more generic concepts like Superstition in the Barbarian's case.


My experiences with 'anime themes' in gaming have been varied. Most of my exposure to it in gaming is from people simply using their favorite anime character as their character art. Most of the time it annoys me a bit to see all these more realistic character tokens (I most commonly used Roll20), and then just one blob of pink and blue. But that was a minor annoyance.

The things that really annoyed me were when I encountered people taking generic anime trops and making characters who were just 'that'. They'd tend to try to pair it with comedy, and just come out as really annoying. I've seen some really cringey stuff because of it.

I've recently actually gotten a bit more into watching anime however, and I can start to see it as a cool place to take inspiration from. There's plenty of shows out there with good characters and stories, and a DM is only as good the sources he 'borrows from'. (Also I might want to try to make a PF version of a certain flag carrying holy maiden.)


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Reksew_Trebla wrote:

I ask because the one and only time I brought up something even close to anime on this site, I got heavily ridiculed and told how anime was “awful” with heaviliy faulty arguments (they were faulty because those same arguments were things Pathfinder not only does, but does to more of a ridiculous extreme, like “oh they can get shot off a skyscraper with a gun and not die”, even though you can get shot out of orbit and hit the ground and only take 20 points of damage in Pathfinder, for example).

So how do you feel about anime themes in Pathfinder?

I agree with multiple posters above. The question is too vague for me to answer meaningfully. We talking Fist of the North Star or Whisper of the Heart?


This is more a poll than a question. And one that is more suited for your table then the likes of us lowly internet personalities.

I don't really like anime, I also don't really like cartoons very much either. Other things I don't like: Comic Books, transformers movies, sequels, skateboarding, politics, and bugs... but hey that's just me.

However if you like it then you like it. There should be no ridicule or disrespect for that, and anyone that throws judgmental shade at you is being foolish.

This is more the question of are you okay with people not really liking the themes you might be into, and compromising/respecting those opinions? I'm not really sure what those elements are since I don't have a vast knowledge of anime, but I do think that Pathfinder is more so designed around fantasy themes where there is definitely the supernatural but not always the super-powerful.

The creative intention was more Gandalf vs Merlin rather than Goku vs Superman. But you are free to use the system however you want.


I like options. If PF has the option to do anime stuff, then cool. I'm all for that.

That said, I don't think PF is the best system to play an anime-inspired game. My favourite choice there would be Mutants and Masterminds. There's probably even better choices than that out there too, but M&M is something I actually know how to play.


Are you going to enhance the collective group with a fun and engaging character?

Yeah whatever yo, have fun.

I interpret this question as: "Does your character/theme/game draw inspiration from stereotypical Weeaboo sources?"

Though, in truth when i see someone say "No Anime" what i read is "No Kids."


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'm not really a fan of anime, but I loved "Avatar: The Last Airbender" and I still watch "Pokemon" from time to time because it reminds me of watching it with my son when he was very young. But overall, it's not something that appeals to me. That doesn't make it bad or good in my view of it. It's just a non issue for me.


Reksew_Trebla wrote:

I ask because the one and only time I brought up something even close to anime on this site, I got heavily ridiculed and told how anime was “awful” with heaviliy faulty arguments (they were faulty because those same arguments were things Pathfinder not only does, but does to more of a ridiculous extreme, like “oh they can get shot off a skyscraper with a gun and not die”, even though you can get shot out of orbit and hit the ground and only take 20 points of damage in Pathfinder, for example).

So how do you feel about anime themes in Pathfinder?

I find anime awful and dislike anything smelling of it games that I play.

But, this is a matter of taste and that differs wildly.
No need to ricule what other people like and you're right; playing Pathfinder at levels 10+ isn't even close to "gritty/realistic".

Good gaming to you all


I'd say the big problem isn't themes present in anime but aesthetics.
While these are by no means universal in anime, there are a number of clichés, stylistic choices and visual effects and behavioral elements that are prevalent.
You show sexual excitement by nosebleeds, you have big ol' magical circles light up the air when you cast spells, you scream the names of techniques out loud, people sneeze when talked about behind their back, etc.

Even if the actual feats characters perform are the same, presentation can differ. One person may want to have their sword split boulders and present it as "I cut the boulder in two and get on with the story/fight". Another may have her PC leap into the air screaming at the top of her lungs for a minute before yelling "Ultra-Mega-Super-Transdimensional Rock Cutting Wave Hand!!!!!!!!!!!"
End result is the same, but one feels far more flashy and 'anime' than the other. I definitely lean more towards the former in my D&D games.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Just saying, but Pathfinder magic errs very heavily into the arcane sigils of power when casting spells what with spell manifestations and a pretty sizable portion of the art. Sure it's mostly the Warmachine/Hordes sort where it's mostly a rune circle localized to around the hand/arm but it's there. You'll also see plenty of bubbles/runes in comic books as well. "Kirby Bubbles" are a pretty famous example of that sort of representation and Jack Kirby wasn't exactly a titan of Japanese animation/manga (in that he wasn't related to it at all).


Archimedes The Great wrote:


The creative intention was more Gandalf vs Merlin rather than Goku vs Superman. But you are free to use the system however you want.

Hey, lets throw oil on the fire...Pathfinder doesn't make Gandalf or Merlin characters. Both of them are famous literary magic users that inspired the creation of Wizards and everything arcane in D&D, but a Pathfinder Wizard isn't like either Gandalf or Merlin.

Pathfinder wizards pop off spells constantly and they concretely do more with magic...but somehow come off as accomplishing less? With more spells? Both Gandalf and Merlin come off as more suave. It is like comparing James Bond with Mike Hammer. Mike gets the job done but James Bond is just more impressive.

I suppose you could argue that Gandalf isn't a wizard but actually a Magus. Gandalf fought more with a sword than he did with magic.

And Merlin? He's more of a Plot Device. AKA: the GM.


Gandalf is an Outsider with “cast as a sorcerer” who happens to look human. Cant remember the Tolkien name, though.


Maiar (singular: Maia). In Pathfinder terms, I'd say the Maiar are closer to being a demigod than an empyreal lord.

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber; Pathfinder Comics Subscriber

Let’s see I have a player with a monk inspired by Goku, a ninja inspired by Deadpool, another with a brawler inspired somewhat by Vegeta, but the game has a combination of archetypes that lets you essentially play Gambit.

What’s the difference between anime and superhero comic book inspiration I wonder?

The line between the two is, to my mind, nonexistent.

When people say: “I don’t like X in Pathfinder because it’s too ‘anime’.”
I suspect they haven’t really interrogated that thought too deeply. Is it that they don’t like unnaturalistic action for martial heroes? Is it just a racism?

I always find it odd that GMs expect multiple characters in the same game, at the same table to exist under different genre conventions. Martials must operate as if they are gritty murdermen from a Robert E Howard or George R.R. Martin tale, while even the barest hint of magic allows a character to exist as if they are part of a silver age comic book, or animated feature unbound by the laws of physics and biology their non-magical counterparts are forced to exist under.

“No anime characters” as a rule flags to me: “If you want to accomplish anything rad, sick, or incredible narratively you had better play a spellcaster so I can justify it in the fiction”, but usually it flags to me: “I as a GM care less about my players fulfilling their fantasies than I care about fulfilling mine” and that is usually a GM I don’t want to play with.


At my table, we tend to keep things 'setting appropriate'. So unless we are playing in a game that already has 'anime' under(over)tones, we simply don't make use of the genre (in any of its forms).

Have we played anime-style games in Pathfinder? Sure. Are they one-off games? Usually.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

As someone that has built his characters based on The Secret Of Nimh and Darkwing Duck I have no problem whatsoever with characters, campaigns, or options based on anime, or any other genre.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
captain yesterday wrote:
The Secret Of Nimh

That movie terrified me as a child. I don’t know what my parents were thinking letting me watch it. Wait, strike that, I actually do know what they were thinking. This is a cartoon, they thought, and cartoons are for children. Especially cartoons about funny talking animals.

Didn’t stop me watching it again and again, though. ‘Twas quality.


I love anime, I love sharing anime with my kids (the ones appropriate to age level, of course), and I have no problem with people using it as inspiration.

Have I seen cringy anime inspired stuff? Oh yeah, and some of it was even mine, back in the day. But I got better, older, wiser. I learned that with any source of inspiration, be it anime, comic books, movies, novels, or even the PERSON'S OWN BRAIN, the most important thing is moderation.

Every truly problematic character I have seen has been problematic because they were slavishly straightjacketed to their inspiration. Characters that were not allowed to grow, to evolve, to react to their surroundings, whether that be the world, the NPCs, or the other PCs (especailly other PCs). I see it as an extension of the "build" mentality (which I have my own opinions on, but that's a different topic) where characters don't progress through a journey of choices and opportunities, they just climb a ladder of pre-destined advancement. This becomes doubly problematic as most "based on so-and-so" characters tend to have a certain point where the build "works" or "comes online", with what comes before being "incomplete".

Characters inspired by something, anything, tend to be problematic when they subscribe to a circular logic mentality of "My character is based on So-and-so, who would react like so, so thats what he does." You aren't playing a character at that point, rather, you aren't playing YOUR character, you are playing the original character transplanted into a world/culture/story they likely won't or can't mesh with. Those minor dissonances will pile up until they become obvious, at which point you either have to break free or double down.

The same thing about movies "inspired by" books that gets us upset (not sticking closely enough to the source material) should be the goal when creating characters, in my opinion. If several sessions go by and I can ask "Is your character based on anything?" and you give an answer and my response is "Oh, I can see that, cool!" then its fine. You can have a hot headed pyrokineticist who wants to be strong, and nobody will know its based off Bakugo from My Hero Academia. Just use some moderation.

And sometimes, it will be hard, sometimes people will make connections that aren't there. In the recent session of Return of the Runlords, the gingerbread witch's familiar savagely murdered some sleeping goblins, one of its red candy eyes glowing from within. A couple players said they caught the Goblin Slayer reference, but that was merely coincidence. The glowing eye was a reference to the particular entity serving as the witch's patron, foreshadowing for a later reveal (which im not going to drop here because my players lurk here too).

One thing I want to return to. Kineticist is great for realizing most "inspired by" concepts. It really is. Heck, I'm playing a dragon pact kineticist in a Rise of the Runelords game. My Ulfen Warrior from the Land of the Linnorm Kings is slowly turning into a monster, a fanged, spiked draconic hulk. He's wrathful, even as he tries to protect the people around him. My inspiration? The Elder Dragon Nergigante from Monster Hunter World.

So yeah. As in all things, moderation.


Guts is always valid in Pathfinder. Always.

When it comes down to it, Pathfinder paints it's setting broadly. There is a place for everything, from fighting laser shooting robots with an oversized sword to gritty folk horror.

When you examine "anime themes" as a concept, there tends to a through one that binds it together. Shounen anime seems to be what they are always referring to and I think that is an applicable source for some dislike. Shounen is aimed at kids. I imagine they'd be disappointed by a doofy He-man clone as well.

So, really, it is a very poorly articulated point about they don't like childish/immature themes in their games. Probably.


I read plenty of manga and watch more anime than many would considerate reasonable. With this said, i prefer to play PF the way it is, when i GM, i also keep things in setting so i dont go much towards an anime vibe.

I have played anime games, but every single time another system was used.

Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder RPG / General Discussion / Do you like or dislike anime themes in Pathfinder? All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.