Official rules about purchacing and upgrading magic items.


Pathfinder RPG General Discussion


What is the latest iteration of the official rules about purchacing and upgrading magic items?

I know about page 460 in the core rule book and the rules using prestige points in pathfinder society.

Technically there are no limits I think to upgrading magic items in the core rulesbook, though I guess a dm could enforce the purchacing magic items limits on upgrades.

Are there rules about this anywhere else?


PFS rules or standard rules?


Both. Though I think am familiar with pfs rules unless they have changed in the last couple of years.

The Exchange

Are you asking “how far can you upgrade your items?” The answer is “as far as your caster level, skill, and wealth allow.”

“What’s the most expensive item you can purchase?” - Depends on the size and qualities of the settlement you are in. Check out the Game Mastery Guide for rules on magic item availability.

Of course your GM can restrict this, and PFS has its own rules (no crafting, Prestige limits on item values restrict you from pouring all your wealth into one item, but overall availability is high).


Magic item purchasing is subject to in-world availability, and that is strictly situational--there's no rule guaranteeing that an item is available in a given campaign.

There are guidelines for settlements that GMs can use to adjudicate whether a specific item is available in, say, a metropolis versus a small village. But that's no guarantee either--those guidelines are for streamlining purposes, and a GM may instead plot out item availability manually or use a different system entirely.

As for upgrading, the CRB has guidelines for adding additional powers to existing magical items, both via crafting. The only limits on such crafting are time, funds, and the inherent limits of magic items themselves (e.g., you can't upgrade to a +12 dagger because +12 daggers can't be created using the magic item creation rules).


Belafon wrote:

Are you asking “how far can you upgrade your items?” The answer is “as far as your caster level, skill, and wealth allow.”

Well I generally agree, though I would add its only "your" but also any other spellcasters in town. There seem to be no guidelines for that. So that's why I am asking if I have missed any.

Belafon wrote:


“What’s the most expensive item you can purchase?” - Depends on the size and qualities of the settlement you are in. Check out the Game Mastery Guide for rules on magic item availability.

Actually doesn't the Core have the same rules? In any case thanks because I had forgotten that the Game Mastery Guide could have info on this issue.

Belafon wrote:


Of course your GM can restrict this, and PFS has its own rules (no crafting, Prestige limits on item values restrict you from pouring all your wealth into one item, but overall availability is high).

Yeah I find the rules in PFS the most detailed and complete. But unless you mess up your mission many many times you will have access to basically anything you want.


blahpers wrote:

Magic item purchasing is subject to in-world availability, and that is strictly situational--there's no rule guaranteeing that an item is available in a given campaign.

There are guidelines for settlements that GMs can use to adjudicate whether a specific item is available in, say, a metropolis versus a small village. But that's no guarantee either--those guidelines are for streamlining purposes, and a GM may instead plot out item availability manually or use a different system entirely.

Yeah I was asking wether there are specific rules about purchasing magic items, beyond those in the Core rulebook.

I understand you do this based upon your campaign world and what the dm thinks should be available.
My main interest was wether there a more detailed or complete rule in another sourcebook.

blahpers wrote:


As for upgrading, the CRB has guidelines for adding additional powers to existing magical items, both via crafting. The only limits on such crafting are time, funds, and the inherent limits of magic items themselves (e.g., you can't upgrade to a +12 dagger because +12 daggers can't be created using the magic item creation rules).

Yes but the issue as I mentioned in the post above is that there is no guideline for spellcasters (and their crafting abilities) available to upgrade your items.

The Exchange

Ah, so you're mainly interested in "what are the limits on paying someone to upgrade my items for me?"

There aren't any guidelines for this. I'd use the spellcasting available for hire in a settlement to determine what upgrades can be done. With appropriate modifiers for qualities like magically attuned or superstitious. If a settlement has a spellcasting level of 7, they can upgrade to anything requiring a CL of 13 or less and that doesn't have an 8th or 9th level spell as a prereq.

If you're asking about costs, it's the difference between the old and new items. So upgrading from a +1 greatsword to a +2 greatsword is going to cost 6000 gp (3000 gp in materials and 3000 in labor). That's not explicitly spelled out but it's the only answer that makes sense. A craftsman isn't going to agree to upgrade your sword at a reduced price if he could just make a new one and sell it for more profit.


Belafon wrote:

Ah, so you're mainly interested in "what are the limits on paying someone to upgrade my items for me?"

There aren't any guidelines for this. I'd use the spellcasting available for hire in a settlement to determine what upgrades can be done. With appropriate modifiers for qualities like magically attuned or superstitious. If a settlement has a spellcasting level of 7, they can upgrade to anything requiring a CL of 13 or less and that doesn't have an 8th or 9th level spell as a prereq.

If you're asking about costs, it's the difference between the old and new items. So upgrading from a +1 greatsword to a +2 greatsword is going to cost 6000 gp (3000 gp in materials and 3000 in labor). That's not explicitly spelled out but it's the only answer that makes sense. A craftsman isn't going to agree to upgrade your sword at a reduced price if he could just make a new one and sell it for more profit.

bonus upgrades are item price difference (it is explicitly spelled out), though upgrading to add a new ability is 1.5 times the cost of the new ability.

The Exchange

Lelomenia wrote:
Belafon wrote:

Ah, so you're mainly interested in "what are the limits on paying someone to upgrade my items for me?"

There aren't any guidelines for this. I'd use the spellcasting available for hire in a settlement to determine what upgrades can be done. With appropriate modifiers for qualities like magically attuned or superstitious. If a settlement has a spellcasting level of 7, they can upgrade to anything requiring a CL of 13 or less and that doesn't have an 8th or 9th level spell as a prereq.

If you're asking about costs, it's the difference between the old and new items. So upgrading from a +1 greatsword to a +2 greatsword is going to cost 6000 gp (3000 gp in materials and 3000 in labor). That's not explicitly spelled out but it's the only answer that makes sense. A craftsman isn't going to agree to upgrade your sword at a reduced price if he could just make a new one and sell it for more profit.

bonus upgrades are item price difference (it is explicitly spelled out), though upgrading to add a new ability is 1.5 times the cost of the new ability.

I just realized that both Lelomenia and I are guilty of inconsistency in terms. (Granted, the CRB isn't the best worded in this area either.)

Price is how much you would pay at retail.
Cost is the value of materials used in the creation/upgrade

You would pay the full price difference between the two items. The CRB refers to the cost difference, but that's referring to when you do it yourself (page 553). There's no specific text on having someone else do it for you, hence my earlier comment.


John John wrote:
blahpers wrote:

Magic item purchasing is subject to in-world availability, and that is strictly situational--there's no rule guaranteeing that an item is available in a given campaign.

There are guidelines for settlements that GMs can use to adjudicate whether a specific item is available in, say, a metropolis versus a small village. But that's no guarantee either--those guidelines are for streamlining purposes, and a GM may instead plot out item availability manually or use a different system entirely.

Yeah I was asking wether there are specific rules about purchasing magic items, beyond those in the Core rulebook.

I understand you do this based upon your campaign world and what the dm thinks should be available.
My main interest was wether there a more detailed or complete rule in another sourcebook.

blahpers wrote:


As for upgrading, the CRB has guidelines for adding additional powers to existing magical items, both via crafting. The only limits on such crafting are time, funds, and the inherent limits of magic items themselves (e.g., you can't upgrade to a +12 dagger because +12 daggers can't be created using the magic item creation rules).
Yes but the issue as I mentioned in the post above is that there is no guideline for spellcasters (and their crafting abilities) available to upgrade your items.

There are guidelines for both available magic items and available spellcasters based on settlement size in the GameMastery guide, as mentioned above.

For example, an otherwise unremarkable small town following these guidelines would have a 75% chance of a given item being available if said item's value is 1,000 gp or less. Some 3d4 specific minor items and 1d6 specific medium items above 1,000 gp would also be available in the same town if the PCs spend some time spent browsing. Finally, spellcasting services up to 4th level would be available for purchase.

Modifiers can raise or lower magic item and/or spellcasting availability as well. A prosperous small town will have more stuff available; a superstitious small town will have much lower spellcasting services; and so on.

As far as I know, the link above pretty much does it as far as shopping guidelines are concerned. If you're looking to hire a spellcaster to craft a custom item for you, there's no specific guideline for that, but you could cobble something together starting with the item's price and optionally adding in something to represent the time spent--likely somewhere above 3 gp/day and below 30 gp/day, based on the cost of other skilled laborers. You are also likely to be limited to items that can be crafted by spellcasters able to cast spells of the given level without too much trouble--even a dedicated crafter can only skip so many prerequisites, for example, and most NPC hires aren't as ptimized as a PC built for the same task.

Hopefully that provides a starting point! Does this help, or are you looking for something specific not covered by these guidelines?


Belafon wrote:
Ah, so you're mainly interested in "what are the limits on paying someone to upgrade my items for me?"

Basically yes that's what I was asking. (And if there were any other rules for buying magic items apart from the Core.)

Belafon wrote:


There aren't any guidelines for this. I'd use the spellcasting available for hire in a settlement to determine what upgrades can be done. With appropriate modifiers for qualities like magically attuned or superstitious. If a settlement has a spellcasting level of 7, they can upgrade to anything requiring a CL of 13 or less and that doesn't have an 8th or 9th level spell as a prereq.

That's a neat idea and it makes sense. I guess then the only issue is that even in a metropolis the maximum upgrade will be of 15th level. So items like belt of physical perfection will never be easily upgradable, which I don't especially mind actually.

Belafon wrote:


If you're asking about costs, it's the difference between the old and new items. So upgrading from a +1 greatsword to a +2 greatsword is going to cost 6000 gp (3000 gp in materials and 3000 in labor). That's not explicitly spelled out but it's the only answer that makes sense. A craftsman isn't going to agree to upgrade your sword at a reduced price if he could just make a new one and sell it for more profit.

Oh yeah I know how that goes.

I actually I am asking because I was used from 3.5 to allowing players to buy whatever they wanted. I was thinking of using pathfinder purchase system if there was any and simply wondered if there was any version apart the one in the Core (turns out there is one in the game mastery guide).

In any case thanks for the help Belafon


blahpers wrote:


There are guidelines for both available magic items and available spellcasters based on settlement size in the GameMastery guide, as mentioned above.

Thanks for the link! So its basically as the one in the core rulebook+max spell level available.

blahpers wrote:


For example, an otherwise unremarkable small town following these guidelines would have a 75% chance of a given item being available if said item's value is 1,000 gp or less. Some 3d4 specific minor items and 1d6 specific medium items above 1,000 gp would also be available in the same town if the PCs spend some time spent browsing. Finally, spellcasting services up to 4th level would be available for purchase.

Modifiers can raise or lower magic item and/or spellcasting availability as well. A prosperous small town will have more stuff available; a superstitious small town will have much lower spellcasting services; and so on.

I was going to say that I knew about the rules, but I had no idea about

the settlements qualities part. So despite what I posted above if the qualities are helping a metropolis will cover 90% of you purchace needs even at very high levels.

I actually just found that in Planar adventures there is a planar hubs part that pretty much could cover for 100% of what a very high level adventurer wants. So that make sense, though its funny we had to wait for so long to get purchase limits for a planar metropolis.

blahpers wrote:


As far as I know, the link above pretty much does it as far as shopping guidelines are concerned. If you're looking to hire a spellcaster to craft a custom item for you, there's no specific guideline for that, but you could cobble something together starting with the item's price and optionally adding in something to represent the time spent--likely somewhere above 3 gp/day and below 30 gp/day, based on the cost of other skilled laborers. You are also likely to be limited to items that can be crafted by spellcasters able to cast spells of the given level without too much trouble--even a dedicated crafter can only skip so many prerequisites, for example, and most NPC hires aren't as ptimized as a PC built for the same task.

I guess crafting a custom item is either automatic if its within the base value of the settlements or yeah if its higher than that it gets iffy, mainly because there is no essential difference between crafting and upgrading, why can you upgrade to sth but can't really find it for buying? I guess the main difference here is waiting for the upgrade to happen. Also as you note it then becomes a dm sensibility thing of wether the wizard has the specific spells you want or not.

I don't feel its that big of an issue though.

blahpers wrote:


Hopefully that provides a starting point! Does this help, or are you looking for something specific not covered by these guidelines?

No I think you pretty much helped to cover everything I wanted. Many thanks !


John John wrote:

I guess crafting a custom item is either automatic if its within the base value of the settlements or yeah if its higher than that it gets iffy, mainly because there is no essential difference between crafting and upgrading, why can you upgrade to sth but can't really find it for buying? I guess the main difference here is waiting for the upgrade to happen. Also as you note it then becomes a dm sensibility thing of wether the wizard has the specific spells you want or not.

Its not I feel that big of an issue though.

Honestly allowing players to create custom magic items for the same cost as standard items is not a good idea. Worst example is Invisibility. By the straight rules a Ring of Invisibility comes out to 12,000 gp. Of course its quite a bit more valuable to have unlimited invisibility on demand so the price got pumped to 20k. There are lots of similar spells that are problematic if you have easy access to them.

As a rule of thumb I think using the Spell Research rules for players creating magic items is reasonable. It adds to the cost, but they can continue to produce it if they want to afterwards for a 'standard' cost. It also potentially gives you more time to think about how to adjust the finished item to not wreck your game.


Meirril wrote:
John John wrote:

I guess crafting a custom item is either automatic if its within the base value of the settlements or yeah if its higher than that it gets iffy, mainly because there is no essential difference between crafting and upgrading, why can you upgrade to sth but can't really find it for buying? I guess the main difference here is waiting for the upgrade to happen. Also as you note it then becomes a dm sensibility thing of wether the wizard has the specific spells you want or not.

Its not I feel that big of an issue though.

Honestly allowing players to create custom magic items for the same cost as standard items is not a good idea. Worst example is Invisibility. By the straight rules a Ring of Invisibility comes out to 12,000 gp. Of course its quite a bit more valuable to have unlimited invisibility on demand so the price got pumped to 20k. There are lots of similar spells that are problematic if you have easy access to them.

As a rule of thumb I think using the Spell Research rules for players creating magic items is reasonable. It adds to the cost, but they can continue to produce it if they want to afterwards for a 'standard' cost. It also potentially gives you more time to think about how to adjust the finished item to not wreck your game.

Yes but that's another issue entirely. Here "custom item" is basically any item that's not available for sale and you want to create from zero.

Spell research rules? I haven't paid any attention to those, I ;ll check them out.


I wouldn’t interpret item caster level as mattering for anything other than wands, scrolls, and potions (and there only if those are allowed to be purchased at above-minimum CL). Settlement spell level is a big deal tho.


So how would you handle someone wanting to upgrade his item?
If item caster level doesn't matter anyone can upgrade anything to any level provided he knows the right spell(s)?


The primary limiting factors are time money and skill. Level doesn't matter so long as a character can meet these requirements. Cost tends to be the most prohibitive factor.


One thing I tend to throw in is time. I don't have NPC enchanters ready to work at a moments notice. Most already have a backlog of items they are working on, or personal projects. A few days or a week before they begin working is normal.

I've also had the Temple of Mordin in Janderhoff produce very expensive magic weapons in 2 or 3 days. A master enchanter with a circle of highly trained assistants can cut the time needed significantly. This was the result of one religion calling in favors owed to get this done, and part of the end game for the campaign. Stuff that would normally take 4 months to enchant was done in 2 days.

If it is easy to contact and contract an enchanter to make magic items, other people should want stuff done too. On the other hand, being capable of making high end magic items should be difficult to work with. They might even have demands of their own...


John John wrote:

So how would you handle someone wanting to upgrade his item?

If item caster level doesn't matter anyone can upgrade anything to any level provided he knows the right spell(s)?

if ‘anyone’ has the craft feats, skill, an appropriate work space, time, materials(usually money), and has the prerequisites, ‘anyone’ can upgrade anything. CL is defined by the item, so you can’t arbitrarily increase it, except with spell trigger/completion items which do have their own limits on how high you can set them.


Time and funds definitely compete as the most limiting factors in item creation. Many adventures just can't wait a month to craft that awesome high-level item. Even if you can offload the work onto an NPC, by the time they're finished you may have leveled enough for the item to be obsolete.


Yes obviously time and money are the main factors, but if you have a system that limits purchasing items, which the settlement rules do, then what do you do about upgrading items?

Belafon said that the maximum spell level available, points to the max caster level spellcasters are capable of upgrading to in that city, after searching this it turns out its propably wrong, you can easily craft something of higher caster level if your skill check is good enough. So I think this confused me on the whole upgrading items thing.

But as has also been mentioned there isn't anything that points to what kind of casters are available for upgrading magic items (apart from available spell levels), I mean its pretty clear what you can and can't buy, but not what you can pay and wait to have upgraded. There are no guidlines for it, is what I am saying.


John John wrote:

Yes obviously time and money are the main factors, but if you have a system that limits purchasing items, which the settlement rules do, then what do you do about upgrading items?

Belafon said that the maximum spell level available, points to the max caster level spellcasters are capable of upgrading to in that city, after searching this it turns out its propably wrong, you can easily craft something of higher caster level if your skill check is good enough. So I think this confused me on the whole upgrading items thing.

But as has also been mentioned there isn't anything that points to what kind of casters are available for upgrading magic items (apart from available spell levels), I mean its pretty clear what you can and can't buy, but not what you can pay and wait to have upgraded. There are no guidlines for it, is what I am saying.

a specific question would be good. In general, if you can buy the item at the settlement in question, you can upgrade an item to that greater item at that same settlement (if that’s an available upgrade for that item). But it takes a lot longer to upgrade than buy off the shelf.

The Exchange

John John wrote:
Belafon said that the maximum spell level available, points to the max caster level spellcasters are capable of upgrading to in that city, after searching this it turns out its propably wrong, you can easily craft something of higher caster level if your skill check is good enough. So I think this confused me on the whole upgrading items thing.

Not exactly. What I said was “there are no rules for hiring someone to upgrade your items for you, here’s what I would do.”

You can bypass a requirement (including caster level), but it makes the DC harder. Unless your GM fully stats out a crafter for you, there’s no way to know what their skill modifiers are. So my suggestion is to play it so that your hired crafter automatically succeeds at the skill checks, knows the relevant crafting feats and all spells up to his spell level, but can’t bypass requirements. That gives you a predictable and fair outcome.


John John wrote:

Yes obviously time and money are the main factors, but if you have a system that limits purchasing items, which the settlement rules do, then what do you do about upgrading items?

Belafon said that the maximum spell level available, points to the max caster level spellcasters are capable of upgrading to in that city, after searching this it turns out its propably wrong, you can easily craft something of higher caster level if your skill check is good enough. So I think this confused me on the whole upgrading items thing.

But as has also been mentioned there isn't anything that points to what kind of casters are available for upgrading magic items (apart from available spell levels), I mean its pretty clear what you can and can't buy, but not what you can pay and wait to have upgraded. There are no guidlines for it, is what I am saying.

Upgrading items is just a specific case of crafting items in which you craft the difference between the original item and the desired result rather than starting from scratch. If a character (PC or NPC) can craft a +5 dagger, they can upgrade a +3 dagger to a +5 dagger; if they can't, they can't. The only difference is that the latter is cheaper and faster.

So the question then becomes "what can be crafted by available NPCs using the guidelines?" The answer is that there really aren't guidelines for that specifically, so one does the best one can. If there are casters of sufficient level to fulfill any prerequisites, great; then you just need someone (possibly one of the casters) with the correct crafting feat and a really good skill check. Me, I'd construct a sort of "template NPC" matching the settlement's spellcasting level; figure out what Spellcraft DC they could hit when taking 10; and call that the default availability, with the understanding that the PCs may have to hire spell provider(s) separately for some cases.

(This assumes that the settlement isn't small enough that I actually know which individuals in town are capable of crafting magic items; in the latter case, I'd stat those individuals directly and that'd solve the problem handily.)


Belafon wrote:
John John wrote:
Belafon said that the maximum spell level available, points to the max caster level spellcasters are capable of upgrading to in that city, after searching this it turns out its propably wrong, you can easily craft something of higher caster level if your skill check is good enough. So I think this confused me on the whole upgrading items thing.

Not exactly. What I said was “there are no rules for hiring someone to upgrade your items for you, here’s what I would do.”

You can bypass a requirement (including caster level), but it makes the DC harder. Unless your GM fully stats out a crafter for you, there’s no way to know what their skill modifiers are. So my suggestion is to play it so that your hired crafter automatically succeeds at the skill checks, knows the relevant crafting feats and all spells up to his spell level, but can’t bypass requirements. That gives you a predictable and fair outcome.

Most of the time, caster level isn't a requirement, so there's nothing to bypass.

The Exchange

blahpers wrote:
Belafon wrote:
John John wrote:
Belafon said that the maximum spell level available, points to the max caster level spellcasters are capable of upgrading to in that city, after searching this it turns out its propably wrong, you can easily craft something of higher caster level if your skill check is good enough. So I think this confused me on the whole upgrading items thing.

Not exactly. What I said was “there are no rules for hiring someone to upgrade your items for you, here’s what I would do.”

You can bypass a requirement (including caster level), but it makes the DC harder. Unless your GM fully stats out a crafter for you, there’s no way to know what their skill modifiers are. So my suggestion is to play it so that your hired crafter automatically succeeds at the skill checks, knows the relevant crafting feats and all spells up to his spell level, but can’t bypass requirements. That gives you a predictable and fair outcome.

Most of the time, caster level isn't a requirement, so there's nothing to bypass.

Caster level is a requirement for most of the items most likely to be upgraded. Armor and weapons, cloaks of resistance, amulets of mighty fists and natural armor. . . Belts and headbands don’t have a CL requirement, but most of the other upgradable common items do.

Anyway, lacking actual statblocks - and remembering that NPCs are usually far less optimized than PCs - I made a suggestion. If the settlement has a caster who can meet the CL and can cast spells of the levels that are the prerequisites, they can automatically succeed. If not, they can’t do it.

Any group is free to play it however they want. Create custom NPCs, run a stochastic simulation of possible NPC crafting skill bonuses, or just decree that anything can be upgraded if you are in a city of more than 5000 people. I like my idea because it is a clean yes/no with no arguments about how the NPC could have squeezed out a couple more points of bonus if he’d really tried, or debates on whether a 9th level cleric would really have taken 3 crafting feats.


Generally I equate "Item is available for purchase" with "someone is available to be commissioned to craft that item".


Thanks for the replies guys, I think you have cleared up the upgrading issue as much as you possibly could.

I 'll see now how to deal with it in my own campaigns!


Belafon wrote:
Caster level is a requirement for most of the items most likely to be upgraded. Armor and weapons, cloaks of resistance, amulets of mighty fists and natural armor. . . Belts and headbands don’t have a CL requirement, but most of the other upgradable common items do.

Actually the vast majority of magic items have a flat CL. While Armor and Weapons are notable exceptions, most items have the same CL for lesser and greater versions of the same item. A +2 Headband of Intellect is CL 8. So is a +6 Headband. A +1 and a +5 Cloak of Resistance are both CL 5. Same for Natural Armor. Amulet of Mighty Fists acts like a weapon so it follows the same variable CL.

The Exchange

Meirril wrote:
Belafon wrote:
Caster level is a requirement for most of the items most likely to be upgraded. Armor and weapons, cloaks of resistance, amulets of mighty fists and natural armor. . . Belts and headbands don’t have a CL requirement, but most of the other upgradable common items do.
Actually the vast majority of magic items have a flat CL. While Armor and Weapons are notable exceptions, most items have the same CL for lesser and greater versions of the same item. A +2 Headband of Intellect is CL 8. So is a +6 Headband. A +1 and a +5 Cloak of Resistance are both CL 5. Same for Natural Armor. Amulet of Mighty Fists acts like a weapon so it follows the same variable CL.

I believe you are confusing the item’s CL with the construction requirements.

Cloak of resistance wrote:

CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

COST varies
+1 bonus 500 GP
+2 bonus 2,000 GP
+3 bonus 4,500 GP
+4 bonus 8,000 GP
+5 bonus 12,500 GP
Craft Wondrous Item, resistance, creator’s caster level must be at least three times the cloak’s bonus

Same for Amulets of Natural Armor. Belts and headbands are close to the only “commonly upgraded” items that don’t have a CL requirement.


John John wrote:
Belafon wrote:


There aren't any guidelines for this. I'd use the spellcasting available for hire in a settlement to determine what upgrades can be done. With appropriate modifiers for qualities like magically attuned or superstitious. If a settlement has a spellcasting level of 7, they can upgrade to anything requiring a CL of 13 or less and that doesn't have an 8th or 9th level spell as a prereq.
That's a neat idea and it makes sense. I guess then the only issue is that even in a metropolis the maximum upgrade will be of 15th level. So items like belt of physical perfection will never be easily upgradable, which I don't especially mind actually.

Yes and no. There is the Rogue Talent Black Market Connections that lets you shift up one row on the table. When this is done on the last row, you go off the table. By extrapolation you get:

Base Limit: 32,000 gp
Purchase Limit: 250,000 gp
Spellcasting: 9th
Base Value: 32,000 gp
Minor: *
Medium: 4d4 items
Major: 3d4 items

/cevah, I know a guy...

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