What's something weird that annoys you?


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When fictional settings use the wrong names for mythical creatures. (That's not a Wyvern, WoW. That's a Chimera and you know it. You're just trying to be contrary.)

When fantasy settings make up their own names for creatures that are clearly carbon copies of entities from mythology. (Though in settings that have very little mythical basis it's okay. But it's things like Griffin, Hydra, Troll, Tauren, that annoy me. Why not just call a Minotaur a Minotaur?)

Having a physical body that requires sleep and sustenance.

The many, many, bizarre and seemingly random sensory issues that coincide with my Asperger's syndrome, and how difficult they are to explain and justify to other people.

The conflation of distinct mythical creatures, particularly if they originate in different cultures.

People who use the lack of objective morality to justify unethical behavior.

The "Everyone Hates Hades" trope.

Having to explain to people that the Transformers I'm a fan of and collect are totally distinct from the Michael Bay movies and come from a far higher quality collective of stories and lore.

The lack of available info on African mythical beasties.

I do like Supernatural, but their treatment of non-Abrahamic mythical creatures/figures, particularly divinities, really annoys me.

Reviewers who nitpick perfectly decent media.

Media that assumes that only one female body type is attractive, particularly media with an abundance of female characters that takes that approach. This isn't even a representation thing, though representation's definitely important. Honestly, diversity is just aesthetically pleasing. Works where all the girls look exactly the same except for hair, costume and maybe skin tone are just boring.


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Tequila Sunrise wrote:
Tender Tendrils wrote:
The general concept of money and the general concept of time.

Is this a philosophical-surfer-dude "Time, is like, so weird" thing, or a "Ugh I hate how society and our lives revolve around getting up at 6am" thing?

Because one of those is weird, the other is not. ;)

Both - I tend to space out and dissociate a lot and my memory is a bit broken so the passage of time is very weird for me at times, and I am also a person who is under a lot of time pressures all of the time and sometimes I wish I could just have an extra day in the week.


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I'd honestly take an extra week each week, half of which is weekends.

I've got stuff to do and never enough time to do it!

Scarab Sages

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People who blow in the phone horn / microphone when on the phone. Ugh.


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Wannabe Demon Lord wrote:
The conflation of distinct mythical creatures, particularly if they originate in different cultures.

Are you talking about alicorns? Because I just learned about that term, and I'm completely ready to be annoyed by it if there's a convenient bandwagon I can jump on.


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Wannabe Demon Lord wrote:
When fantasy settings make up their own names for creatures that are clearly carbon copies of entities from mythology. (Though in settings that have very little mythical basis it's okay. But it's things like Griffin, Hydra, Troll, Tauren, that annoy me. Why not just call a Minotaur a Minotaur?)

I personally prefer custom naming if and only if the original name derives from an earth-specific proper name. If whatever setting we're in has absolutely nothing whatsoever named Minos, calling something a Minotaur doesn't make any sense.


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People who think Cthulhu could beat Godzilla in a fight are annoying.

Into the dirt >his< will be done. Now feel your fear.


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Tacticslion wrote:
Oh? You haven't heard of people who pour milk into their bowl, and then the cereal? I didn't believe that was a thing, first, either.

OH, yeah. That's weird. One of my players is the 12 year old daughter of another. She does that.


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high G wrote:

People who think Cthulhu could beat Godzilla in a fight are annoying.

Into the dirt >his< will be done. Now feel your fear.

Man, tell me about it.

I mean, Cthulu fears boats.

Godzilla fears crap all.

I've made my opinion rather abundantly clear on the matter.

And I like the Cthulu mythos more than Godzilla.


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The many Perfectly Sane and Rational annoyances I have would take too long to list in their entirety... but here's a few, raning from the silly to the serious...

People who actually use the word "supper" to refer to the evening meal in conversation.

People who use the word "snowmobile." Ever.

People who, upon meeting you, try to hash out if they know any of your relatives. Look, you either know them or you don't, sitting there going, "are you one of THOSE <insert name here>?" is a tedious waste of time dressed up as being folksy.

People who get snippy when the person taking their order doesn't thank them for coming in. Listen, scuzzbucket, they're at work, expecting them to be off their head with joy because another customer slouched in for the meat loaf is just idiotic.

People who tell other people to smile. They'll smile if they feel like smiling. Take your "smile and the world smiles back" platitudes and shove 'em where the sun don't shine.

"Who would win?" debates between fandoms. Look. The rules in these different fictional universes always flex for the desired outcome anyway.See: Batman's entire career in the modern era.


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I say "supper" and "dinner" interchangeably.


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Cole Deschain wrote:
People who actually use the word "supper" to refer to the evening meal in conversation.

In my defense, my mom was raised in Arkansas, and my dad is from West Virginia & Ohio. I've mostly deprogrammed myself to call it dinner, but I do slip.

Cole Deschain wrote:
People who use the word "snowmobile." Ever.

I've only ever called them that. So do Polaris and Yamaha. What do you call them?

(Any interest I had in snowmobiles evaporated immediately once I saw tracked snow-WRXs.)

Cole Deschain wrote:
People who tell other people to smile. They'll smile if they feel like smiling. Take your "smile and the world smiles back" platitudes and shove 'em where the sun don't shine.

Agreed. Anyone who tells me to smile gets my resting Jessica Jones face.


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Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Cole Deschain wrote:
People who actually use the word "supper" to refer to the evening meal in conversation.
In my defense, my mom was raised in Arkansas, and my dad is from West Virginia & Ohio. I've mostly deprogrammed myself to call it dinner, but I do slip.

Where in Arkansas is your mom from?


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Cole Deschain wrote:
People who actually use the word "supper" to refer to the evening meal in conversation.
In my defense, my mom was raised in Arkansas, and my dad is from West Virginia & Ohio. I've mostly deprogrammed myself to call it dinner, but I do slip.

Where in Arkansas is your mom from?

Mena


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I know right where that's at. I grew up in the Batesville area.


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People that use "life isn't fair" to justify acting unfairly (which is an appeal to nature fallacy btw).


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I say "supper" and "dinner" interchangeably.

So do I.

I actually learned that "dinner" is the big meal of the day, so it can be synonymous with either "lunch" or "supper" depending on which was the bigger meal.

My parents took serious advantage of that when we were young. Both sets of their parents (my grandparents) lived in the same town, so when we visited them we would typically spend the night at the home of my father's parents and then leave after breakfast to spend most of the day with my mother's parents, where we would have lunch/dinner. At the end of the day we would return to the home of my father's parents, where we would have supper/dinner. Nobody ever lost any weight on any of those trips.


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A vegetarian with a cigarette in their mouth telling me my cheeseburger is bad for me.
An "anarchist" griping that the cops did not look for the man who "assaulted him" (said assault occured while the "anarchist" was smashing the man's car with a chain. Pregnant wife in car.)

Just a couple of highlights from my time in a wacky town I once lived in.


Also, people who don't use proper honorifics (officer, sir, your honor, doctor..) when interacting with people they don't know on an informal level. Maybe it's my military brat youth showing through, or my time as an instructor in a formal setting.


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I assure you, most people barely understand the meaning of the word "honorifics".


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Here's one: The treatment of cryptids in fantasy media as somehow not being "real" mythical creatures. D&D rarely ever features them, except for yetis, and in D20 Modern. There's really nothing stopping most of them from appearing in sword and sorcery era stuff though. The Sasquatch is not a modern entity. Folklore about it and similar creatures abound in world mythology going back thousands of years. And if we're talking European mythology specifically for faux-European settings, ever heard of a Woodwose? I know things like the Chupacabra, Jersey Devil and Mothman are more modern, but there's nothing about those creatures that specifically precludes them from having been around in pre-industrial times and settings. They have surprisingly little presence at all in D&D despite how long it's been around and how iconic they are. And don't get me started on Supernatural's claim that Sasquatch is just a guy in a suit in that universe. Sure, Bloody Mary and the Hookman exist, but Sasquatch? Not enough of a folkloric basis, apparently.

Well, at least we've got Pathfinder and the Dresden Files embracing them.


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captain yesterday wrote:
I assure you, most people barely understand the meaning of the word "honorifics".

And this also annoys me.


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Java Man wrote:
captain yesterday wrote:
I assure you, most people barely understand the meaning of the word "honorifics".
And this also annoys me.

Try working in construction. :-)


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New annoyance: the lack of inexpensive cybernetic replacement parts that would allow me to take up a second career in construction.


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I weighed 110 pounds when I started working in construction.


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Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Cole Deschain wrote:
People who use the word "snowmobile." Ever.

I've only ever called them that. So do Polaris and Yamaha. What do you call them?

(Any interest I had in snowmobiles evaporated immediately once I saw tracked snow-WRXs.)

The right and proper term, as used in Alaska (we're right and literally the rest of the English-speaking world is wrong) is "snowmachine."

Not "snow machine." Those are for making fake snow. No, "snowmachine." Completely different.

Although "snow-go," sled," "rig," and "ride" are also acceptable in the right contexts.


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Java Man wrote:
New annoyance: the lack of inexpensive cybernetic replacement parts that would allow me to take up a second career in construction.

New annoyance for me: Our notable lack of genetically-engineered shark's teeth, enabling me to avoid the dentist forever.

And also not need steak knives.


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"But it's a dry heat." And "hot enough for you?" In Phoenix neither of these should ever be used.


Java Man wrote:
"But it's a dry heat." And "hot enough for you?" In Phoenix neither of these should ever be used.

Dry heat or moist heat, it still cooks you.

Saying "Hot enough for you?" during a Florida summer is legally the equivalent of the asker granting the listener consent to be justifiably homicided.


People who think Greedo could have gotten a shot off first against Han Solo annoy me.


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Batman shot first.


high G wrote:

People who can't learn how to do Calculus annoy me.

Quite frankly, the >Catenary< problem has always annoyed me, and even Galileo made reference to its suckage.


high G wrote:
high G wrote:

People who can't learn how to do Calculus annoy me.

Quite frankly, the >Catenary< problem has always annoyed me, and even Galileo made reference to its suckage.

A catenary sounds like a PFRPG hybrid critter waiting for Rawr!badger or Drejk to stat up.


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Sounds like a monastery for cats where the meditate and prepare themselves for the secret war against the canine and avian menaces.


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Logical fallacies. If I have to tell people thinking doesn't work that way I need to resist the urge to do it with the engraved end of a hammer.


BigNorseWolf wrote:
Logical fallacies. If I have to tell people thinking doesn't work that way I need to resist the urge to do it with the engraved end of a hammer.

I believe Stuffy Grammarian's cane works like Donald Blake's.


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People who say "no offense" and then say something offense, as if that magically makes it ok. Usually if I'm on the receiving end of this I reply with "no offense but you're stupid and ugly".

Similarly, people who use "I'm just being honest" or worse "I'm just joking" as an excuse to be a jerk.

People who use the term "virtue signalling" unironically.

Most of the things that make me mad are related to language for some reason.


What is virtue signaling? I tried looking it up, but none of the first few explanations I saw really made me understand it.


Oh!

I hate non-funny nerd humor.

Now a Physicist* making a funny joke is fine. Like, "an electron went to the airport. When asked if it had luggage it said it was traveling light"

That's fine. But when someone's punchline is "Rayleigh Scattering" with nothing else funny... I hate that!

That's not making a joke, that's just showing off you know something others don't. It's using humor to bluntly exclude others intellectually.

*I don't know my physics so I could be making stuff up


MageHunter wrote:

Oh!

I hate non-funny nerd humor.

Now a Physicist* making a funny joke is fine. Like, "an electron went to the airport. When asked if it had luggage it said it was traveling light"

That's fine. But when someone's punchline is "Rayleigh Scattering" with nothing else funny... I hate that!

That's not making a joke, that's just showing off you know something others don't. It's using humor to bluntly exclude others intellectually.

*I don't know my physics so I could be making stuff up

I can understand that. The webcomic XKCD is like that occasionally. There's even a website/wiki called Explain XKCD that I'll check out to learn something new, but if you have to explain a joke, then the joke stops being funny.

If a scientist or other specialist wants to make an obscure joke, more power to them. If they tell it to somebody who gets the joke, great! If they tell it to somebody who doesn't get the joke, they still haven't done anything wrong; they're not controlling how the recipient feels.

But sometimes you'll encounter people who tell obscure jokes and it feels like they are trying to show off their obscure knowledge.

Grand Lodge

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People who try to police other peoples grammar.


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TriOmegaZero wrote:
People who try to police other peoples grammar.

"people's"

*finger guns*


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Ok. Now I have to clean up my computer's screen and keyboard.

Grand Lodge

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We'll be here all week!


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TriOmegaZero wrote:
People who try to police other peoples grammar.

Police?

No.
Crush your solecisms, see them driven before me, and hear the weeping and lamentation of their women?
Mebbe.


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Andostre wrote:

What is virtue signaling? I tried looking it up, but none of the first few explanations I saw really made me understand it.

Its a term people use to mean your only saying/doing some good thing to make yourself look better. Most likely because they'd never do anything nice without ulterior motives so they can't imagine anyone else would either. i.e a prime example of https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/EvilCannotComprehendGood


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Man, I'm surprised nobody mentioned people who use the word "ironic" incorrectly. Those people get me mad. Not the people who use ironic wrong - the people who get mad about it and insist that it's only definition is "the use of a word for its nonliteral meaning".

Um - the dictionary has a little #2 right below it, where it describes a second definition for the word.

Language is an ever-evolving thing. Sometimes words change their meaning. If language never changed we'd all sound like a Dickens novel. Or worse - Beowulf.

I am not a fan of when people use "literally" to mean "a lot", though, because there's no other word that means "in no figurative way whatsoever". Even irony has "metaphor", "simile" and other synonyms to fit the bill. I looked up synonyms to literally, and every one of them was of the colloquial definition.

Gentleman, similarly, means a land owning individual of the noble cast, not "a decent human being who happens to have testicles and a penis". But that's more a problem that we don't have another word for that than the fact people use it as such.

Also, you can't tell me "ain't" is not a word when I found it in a dictionary 27 years ago just to piss a teacher off.


Literally bothers me a lot to (should have put it in the original post in fact), particularly because it's the exact opposite of what it's supposed to mean.


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{wanders in to see what's going-}

The Vagrant Erudite wrote:
Man, I'm surprised nobody mentioned people who use the word "ironic" incorrectly...

⊙﹏⊙

<<

>>

{backs quietly out of thread}


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Annoying? Did the cashier in the fast food drive through call me "cutie" because:

1) ...that's her script to make customers feel better, and thus more likely to return?
1a) ...that's her script to make customers feel better, and she thinks it's dumb, so she's proving a point?
b) ...she mistakenly thought I was a dude? (Really?!)
π) ...she was actually flirting?

Argh.

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