What's something weird that annoys you?


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My singing could curdle water. I have always wanted to be a musician but just don't have the slightest bit of talent for it.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
My singing could curdle water.

Could curdle water. xD

I look forward to the day when brain machine interfaces are somewhat more common, and humans won’t be limited even by their imaginations.

Shadow Lodge

World's most interesting Pan wrote:
Orthos wrote:
Pan wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Andostre wrote:

When you're hanging out with friends, laughing and joking, having great conversations while getting to know everyone better...

And someone brings out their acoustic guitar, expecting all conversation to stop so everyone can start singing to whatever tunes they know. It sounds very hippy, but I feel like it's a pretty common occurrence.

Fortunately, none of my close friends do this as no one knows how to play. My son is a musician but he rarely does this sort of thing, and even then it's just to talk techniques with another musician. The whole "Koom Bay Ya" thing doesn't happen.
That is not fortunate at all. I long for the times that music was common place in homes and taught in schools. Music is really good for the soul and everyone should participate, IMO. To me, it's weird and annoying that people shun impromptu performances and find them annoying...

At the risk of being cruelly blunt, most people who do those kinds of impromptu performances suck at it. It's usually like listening to tortured cats.

Nothing quicker to get me to vacate a room or go looking for my headphones.

The best way to make someone sound better is to join them. I'm dead serious.

Yeah I'm not going to make an already bad situation worse. Nor am I egotistical enough to think that people want to listen to me do so.

There are people who are actually good at music. They're not the kind of people who tend to pull out an instrument in a social gathering, in my experience.


DungeonmasterCal wrote:
My singing could curdle water. I have always wanted to be a musician but just don't have the slightest bit of talent for it.

You may never be a concert quality performer, but you can get better and more importantly enjoy it. Both singing and playing an instrument are improved as a group activity. Some singers are great without any music, some are great as long as they have music, but most people need both. When you harmonize with an honest try both will improve!

Its also not "egotistical" to want to sing and play music in a social setting. It's this exact sentiment that makes people afraid to do it. Instead of everyone feeling empowered to try, thus raising the bar, folks would rather beat people down with the bar. Talk about being egotistical!


Pan wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Andostre wrote:

When you're hanging out with friends, laughing and joking, having great conversations while getting to know everyone better...

And someone brings out their acoustic guitar, expecting all conversation to stop so everyone can start singing to whatever tunes they know. It sounds very hippy, but I feel like it's a pretty common occurrence.

Fortunately, none of my close friends do this as no one knows how to play. My son is a musician but he rarely does this sort of thing, and even then it's just to talk techniques with another musician. The whole "Koom Bay Ya" thing doesn't happen.
That is not fortunate at all. I long for the times that music was common place in homes and taught in schools. Music is really good for the soul and everyone should participate, IMO. To me, it's weird and annoying that people shun impromptu performances and find them annoying...

I actually agree with most everything you've said in response to my gripe. Music (and art in general) are great for society and even attempting to make it makes people better on a personal level. We should empower people to do so, and it's great for us to try despite any insecurities we may have.

However. There's a time and a place. If I'm connecting with people and learning and sharing thoughts and ideas, and a dude walks into the circle of people talking together and starts strumming and singing some B-track from Pearl Jam's self-titled album, it makes it difficult-to-impossible to continue the conversation already in place. It's intrusive rather than inclusive.

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World's most interesting Pan wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
My singing could curdle water. I have always wanted to be a musician but just don't have the slightest bit of talent for it.

You may never be a concert quality performer, but you can get better and more importantly enjoy it. Both singing and playing an instrument are improved as a group activity. Some singers are great without any music, some are great as long as they have music, but most people need both. When you harmonize with an honest try both will improve!

Its also not "egotistical" to want to sing and play music in a social setting. It's this exact sentiment that makes people afraid to do it. Instead of everyone feeling empowered to try, thus raising the bar, folks would rather beat people down with the bar. Talk about being egotistical!

Agreed!!!

Andostre wrote:

I actually agree with most everything you've said in response to my gripe. Music (and art in general) are great for society and even attempting to make it makes people better on a personal level. We should empower people to do so, and it's great for us to try despite any insecurities we may have.

However. There's a time and a place. If I'm connecting with people and learning and sharing thoughts and ideas, and a dude walks into the circle of people talking together and starts strumming and singing some B-track from Pearl Jam's self-titled album, it makes it difficult-to-impossible to continue the conversation already in place. It's intrusive rather than inclusive.

Has this actually happened to you? (My incredulity is toward not you but the society you apparently live in.) I know buckets of (excellent) musicians and have never seen this actually happen. I've seen someone sit outside (hell, I've done it) in a secluded place and then people go join them. I've seen parties where in one corner of the room some folks are jamming and in another having a deep conversation; the two don't interfere with each other.

If anyone did do that, they would be asked to stop. And if they didn't stop, they would be asked to leave.

I mean, if it has happened, that sucks. But if some rando does this they need to be told off. It shouldn't be some common occurrence. Like as often as people jab elevator buttons repeatedly. Or pay $9 for a $1 avocado smashed onto a $1 piece of toast.


Avocados are what they use at dumps to keep the flies off the garbage.


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DeathQuaker wrote:
Has this actually happened to you?

Yes. Just a couple of weekends ago in a couple's backyard sitting in patio chairs while our kids played on the swing set. The guitarist was the host. He got up from the conversation, went inside to get his guitar, and then rejoined as described. I can even name the Pearl Jam song.

Look, this isn't some sort of social justice wrong I've suffered. The guitar guy is still a friend. But for a "weird thing that annoys you" thread, I thought I'd share.

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Fair enough. The defensiveness on my part was more directed toward some of the other anti musician hostility in the thread. Maybe that's just a weird thing that annoys me. Fwiw, I'm sorry.


We cool.

*fist bump*


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Off-topic for the thread, but exactly once have I seen a public sing-along in a bar...

It was when "Folsom Prison blues" came on the house audio, and all of us- I mean that, literally everyone- in a place called The Alley Bar in Bloomington Indiana- sang along at the top of our lungs.

It was awful. And wonderful.

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*fist bump* to Andostre.

Cole that's awesome. I've seen something similar once happen in a bar, but it was "Sweet Caroline" (extra loud on the "Bah bah baaah"s.


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Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
World's most interesting Pan wrote:
The best way to make someone sound better is to join them. I'm dead serious.
Oh my sweet summer child, you've never heard me sing. It's even more terrible than my dancing.

AS's meowing, however, is world-renowned.


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A weird something that others do that I (and you very likely) find very annoying is their uncomfortableness handling my (your) grief. I understand that very few people like to see others they know grieving and feel a desire to comfort them. I actually like that. What I don't like are their efforts to rush in to try and somehow "fix" the situation by offering magical thinking, poorly-considered/unconsidered words, and throwing gifts/promises at me.

Grieving is part of living. Loss is part of having loved. Let me grieve. Let me feel my loss. I don't expect or want anyone to magically fix things. If seeing me experience this makes someone uncomfortable, that's to be expected. That's just human. But I need to go through the process -- it's healthy -- so let me. I'd actually much rather individuals pull away and give me my space & time instead of them throwing every damn impulse running through their head at me. I'm already exhausted and wrung out and twisted up. I don't have any energy left to comfort them because my loss (which wasn't ever a part of their life), my grieving is making them feel uncomfortable. My grief isn't something that needs immediate fixing, especially by efforts that are just throwing everything at it.

And no, this isn't an open door to tell me why their special flavor of religion will automagically make everything better. Or worse, that this is the time to criticize me for previously rejecting their special flavor of religion (if it didn't work for me then, why would anyone even slightly empathetic to my feelings try again right friggin now?) And if I'm grieving a beloved pet, don't tell me I can just get a brand new young one. My pet was family to me -- not background noise, not a chore, not a damn accessory or appliance, not some minor interaction. It's really ok just to sit there in silence.

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If this pertains to a particular recent event, Amby, that sucks and I'm sorry to hear that you (may) have reason to grieve. I pray you get whatever time/space you need to process it.

In response to the general complaint... yeah, grief is one of the universal things all human beings have to deal with--we ALL lose something/someone we love at some point, and sometimes quite often--and it is bizarre how bad we are at handling other people's given how innately part of human life that it is.


Actually, is it that bizarre? At the risk of constructing a just so story, throughout most of human and pre-human history it would have been *very* rare for someone to have a cause to grieve unshared by everyone they spoke with regularly. It’s not a scenario nature would have selected hominids for.


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The sound of Styrofoam rubbing against anything, but most especially itself.


Ugh. That's a horrible sound.

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Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
And no, this isn't an open door to tell me why their special flavor of religion will automagically make everything better. Or worse, that this is the time to criticize me for previously rejecting their special flavor of religion (if it didn't work for me then, why would anyone even slightly empathetic to my feelings try again right friggin now?)

Sadly, I know a lot of people who do this, and/or think this should be done.

The mindset is something along the lines of "yeah you might think you have it all together and everything's okay when things are going fine, but when things are falling apart and life looks terrible that's when we'll be there to provide The Answer and when you'll be looking for something to explain everything/give you hope in your hour of grief and need".

I don't think they really comprehend that with many people it's just going to add anger to their current sadness or stress.


Honestly, what annoys me worse even then climate change deniers (they, at least, have the excuse of being deliberately and maliciously misinformed) are people who acknowledge climate change, know that millions at the least will die, and then do nothing to prepare themselves and their family. I know people who are “worried” about climate change, and yet own multiple computers, multiple cars, don’t own the needlessly extravagant houses they live in, and have nothing squirreled away for rainy days to come.


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Asmodeus' Advocate wrote:
Honestly, what annoys me worse even then climate change deniers (they, at least, have the excuse of being deliberately and maliciously misinformed) are people who acknowledge climate change, know that millions at the least will die, and then do nothing to prepare themselves and their family. I know people who are “worried” about climate change, and yet own multiple computers, multiple cars, don’t own the needlessly extravagant houses they live in, and have nothing squirreled away for rainy days to come.

It's high time for hypersonic missiles!

Shadow Lodge

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Asmodeus' Advocate wrote:
Honestly, what annoys me worse even then climate change deniers (they, at least, have the excuse of being deliberately and maliciously misinformed) are people who acknowledge climate change, know that millions at the least will die, and then do nothing to prepare themselves and their family. I know people who are “worried” about climate change, and yet own multiple computers, multiple cars, don’t own the needlessly extravagant houses they live in, and have nothing squirreled away for rainy days to come.

I'm guessing they fall into the "well SOMEBODY needs to fix this (that isn't me)!" camp.


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Humanity... That is my final answer.


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Asmodeus' Advocate wrote:
I know people who are “worried” about climate change, and yet own multiple computers, multiple cars, don’t own the needlessly extravagant houses they live in, and have nothing squirreled away for rainy days to come.

This is pretty much me and my wife. Multiple computers? We have five between us. Multiple cars? Two. Don't own my needlessly extravagant house? While it's not needlessly extravagant, I do not own my home. Nothing squirreled away for a rainy day? We have some savings, but probably not as much as we should.

Why is this the case? Because I know that the single greatest contribution that I can make to fighting the good fight is to vote for politicians that have a good stance on this issue and encourage others to do the same, as politicians can effect change on a much, much greater scale than I can as an individual. Which is what I do.

So be annoyed with me if you must, but do try to remember not to let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

Shadow Lodge

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Savings won't really help if the economic system that values it collapses due to climate changes. *shrugs*


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TOZ wrote:
Savings won't really help if the economic system that values it collapses due to climate changes. *shrugs*

Like you, I live in Arizona. Savings here might mean a bag of cash and a pistol.

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Cash don't mean nothing if the economy is back to trading water and bread for minerals. Or if the sun has baked everything of value into unusable mess.


Why are computers a problem?


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TOZ wrote:
Cash don't mean nothing if the economy is back to trading water and bread for minerals. Or if the sun has baked everything of value into unusable mess.

Sure, that's painfully obvious. But much like a firearm, it is preferable to have it and not need it than the other way around.

Grand Lodge

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Eh, if I'm ever in a situation where I need a firearm, I'm just going to die. I'm more concerned with having money at the moment than in some what-if situation.


Fumarole wrote:

This is pretty much me and my wife. Multiple computers? We have five between us. Multiple cars? Two. Don't own my needlessly extravagant house? While it's not needlessly extravagant, I do not own my home. Nothing squirreled away for a rainy day? We have some savings, but probably not as much as we should.

Why is this the case? Because I know that the single greatest contribution that I can make to fighting the good fight is to vote for politicians that have a good stance on this issue and encourage others to do the same, as politicians can effect change on a much, much greater scale than I can as an individual. Which is what I do.

Do you feel that being an informed and active voter is mutually exclusive to alleviating financial risk and contributing to the effort to reduce climate change?


Fumarole wrote:
Asmodeus' Advocate wrote:
I know people who are “worried” about climate change, and yet own multiple computers, multiple cars, don’t own the needlessly extravagant houses they live in, and have nothing squirreled away for rainy days to come.

This is pretty much me and my wife. Multiple computers? We have five between us. Multiple cars? Two. Don't own my needlessly extravagant house? While it's not needlessly extravagant, I do not own my home. Nothing squirreled away for a rainy day? We have some savings, but probably not as much as we should.

Why is this the case? Because I know that the single greatest contribution that I can make to fighting the good fight is to vote for politicians that have a good stance on this issue and encourage others to do the same, as politicians can effect change on a much, much greater scale than I can as an individual. Which is what I do.

So be annoyed with me if you must, but do try to remember not to let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

The thing is, that there are degrees to which the environment and society could collapse. In the worst case scenario, where things go right down the shyter and humanity is extinct sixty years from today, there's not a lot that can be done to prepare. But in what I believe to be the more likely scenario - where attempts to abate anthropogenic climate change amount to too little and are begun too late, geoengineering is likewise only begun when the reality of the disaster is already killing and displacing en mass - but where humanity limps on, a little preparation goes a lot further than hoping the politicians fix things.

I'm not saying that you should live a "greener" lifestyle, though it'd be nice if everyone did one person's effect on the global biosphere is negligible. I'm advocating for a cheaper lifestyle, I'm advocating cutting expenses drastically and living on at most one third of your take-home paycheck. People with a third your paycheck manage it. And then the other two thirds of what you take home goes, not in the bank, but somewhere where you make compound interest off it. Ten years from now we'll know how bad the next century is going to suck for humanity, but ten years from now you'll also, if you invest twice as much per year as you need to live on, and average seven percent interest per year, be able to retire and live off passive income. That way when people start losing their livelihoods en mass, you won't be one of them.

Shadow Lodge

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Asmodeus' Advocate wrote:
I'm advocating for a cheaper lifestyle, I'm advocating cutting expenses drastically and living on at most one third of your take-home paycheck. People with a third your paycheck manage it.

A third of my paycheck wouldn't pay my bills. >_> I'm living with my parents and barely making enough to break even and put a bit aside to save up to move out on as it is. <_<


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It's hard to save when a person lives below the poverty line for even an individual, like I do. There isn't a month that goes by I don't have to help from some source or another. When the economy collapses I guess I'm screwed. I can plant a garden, I guess. I did grow up on a farm, so I have that.


DungeonmasterCal wrote:
It's hard to save when a person lives below the poverty line for even an individual, like I do. There isn't a month that goes by I don't have to help from some source or another. When the economy collapses I guess I'm screwed.

I've been there. Back in my earliest memories, when I was five or six, my single parent broke her back in a car accident and couln't walk, let alone work. There were something like five of us kids at the time, and we mostly lived off of free school lunches. I spent my formative years poor enough that after a grocery run I'd hide the saltine crackers so I could ration them without my brothers eating them all. They'd come to me and ask politely, and I'd give them some. For dinner we ate bread cereal, which is exactly what it says on the tin. That's probably a solid part of why it is that people who own things they don't need, but don't own the things they do need, annoy me so much. They have money to invest, and they aren't. It boggles my mind.

It's like, if you take home more than fifteen thousand dollars a year, you should be able to live on a third of it and invest the rest, barring medical complications or too many damn kids. Plenty of people live on five thousand dollars a year. People waste money on the stupidest things - running the heater instead of wearing shoes and a sweater, buying food without coupons (free money people! they are giving out free money online!), eating at restaurants (who looks at that markup and thinks it's a good idea?), buying video games and paying for netflix or paying for cable, all manner of gizmos and gadgets, five freaking computers, borrowing money for a house or a car . . . if you can't afford it now, do you think you'll be able to afford it after a few years of paying interest on those loans? Or is it that you enjoy wondering every month where you're going to find the money to pay for things you don't need and don't use?

Things don't make you happy, we all know this. When my mom's back healed and she got a job and put herself through college and got a job, she bought herself a motorcycle. She lives in a bigger house than I grew up in, despite there being less kids at home, and as far as I know she still lives paycheck to paycheck. She could have quite working before I was even an adult and devoted her life to things that make her happy and fulfilled, instead of devoting her life to working a desk job so she can pay for a motorcycle that she pretty much never has time to ride because she spends all of her time at a desk.

When the economy collapses I guess she's screwed, and that's something weird that annoys me.


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I'm curious how your investments are going to matter in your collapsed economy scenario. Money is only useful when there's a societal institution, I.E. government, backing that currency. I mean...how many investments paid off in 1929?

I also question how a single mother is supposed to support 5 children and be able to quit her job while recovering from a broken back within 12-13 years. You wrote that she broke her back when you were 5-6 years old, but that she should have been able to quit working before you were an adult. Only way that would work is if she had no kids or other responsibilities beyond herself at all.

I'm not saying that people shouldn't be smarter with their money, but at what point is there no joy in life because you're simply existing? That's why people buy a motorcycle - it's not my personal budgetary choice, but it's a thing that brings joy to people, and is also a valid form of efficient transportation. It also represents a form of freedom, and that can't be overstated.

Living on $5k a year can be done, but I dare you to try it in London, Tokyo, New York, Paris, Melbourne, or any other major world city. $415/month. That's food, transportation (walking everywhere is going to wear out shoes quickly, and public transportation still costs something), clothing, shelter, healthcare costs, and utilities. The cheaper food is also the food that's the least healthy for you, so by saving money by eating the cheap stuff you exponentially increase your future healthcare costs (US system; sane systems will have different results). The smaller of a town you live in to reduce housing costs, the more you have to rely on transportation that isn't based on walking. And this before figuring in *any* children, let alone "too many". In this scenario one child is too many.

This is all the worse to me because you don't have to live that way when you're simply refusing to use your available resources of three times that income. Not that $15k/year is a walk in the park either, but it's a lot easier than $5k/year. No, you're not saving anything anymore, but you're in less imminent danger of existence failure.


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When my mom asks me what we should have for dinner then shoots down all my ideas. Especially since she knows I'm pretty easy to feed and it's her and Grandma that have dietary restrictions. So why even ask me in the first place?


Oy, that is annoying.


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No kidding. Although, it doesn't help when we ask Grandma what she wants either. We'd be driving back from whatever we were doing and call her to ask what she wants. We'd say that we'll be passing this, that, and the other. She asks what we're going to get for ourselves. But we don't know that, since we need to know what she wants. It takes forever to get her to tell us something she'll eat.


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Andostre wrote:
Fumarole wrote:

This is pretty much me and my wife. Multiple computers? We have five between us. Multiple cars? Two. Don't own my needlessly extravagant house? While it's not needlessly extravagant, I do not own my home. Nothing squirreled away for a rainy day? We have some savings, but probably not as much as we should.

Why is this the case? Because I know that the single greatest contribution that I can make to fighting the good fight is to vote for politicians that have a good stance on this issue and encourage others to do the same, as politicians can effect change on a much, much greater scale than I can as an individual. Which is what I do.

Do you feel that being an informed and active voter is mutually exclusive to alleviating financial risk and contributing to the effort to reduce climate change?

Not at all.


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Asmodeus' Advocate wrote:
[...] five freaking computers [...]

Since it seems like this was directed at me, I'll respond by saying that of the five computers we have, two are desktops and three are work laptops. Of our two cars, both are long since paid off. I've owned mine for seventeen years and the wife bought hers eleven years ago. We don't drive much: mine is about to hit 140k on the odometer, the wife's is around 45k. We don't own our home because we recently moved to Arizona. We weren't sure if we'd stay here permanently, so decided to rent for at least a year before buying; we should be buying a home sometime next year. And while I don't save as much as I probably should, I do have a 401(k) and a pension for retirement.

My life is not extravagant by any means, but I do realize that I am more fortunate than many.

Also, it seems a bit strange to criticize others for paying for Netflix or video games on a forum dedicated to tabletop roleplaying games. These are all luxuries. I hope you're not advocating pirating any of these things.


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Thing is, things do make me happy. Even if I gave up my NFL red zone for fantasy football, RPGs, frequent bar and restaurant trips I'd be saving for more expensive things and not worrying about rainy days. To be fair, im a little more fortunate than some of the posters here, that I can splurge on my hobbies and still put a few bucks away for retirement and emergencies. I'm not all spend and no save, but at the rate cost of living is increasing, you aint ever gonna enjoy it; so you might as well spend it before you get it.

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Also, it's not immoral to enjoy things now instead of hoarding for later. Being frugal in your youth in order to be luxurious in your later years deprives you of enjoying your best health.


Yeah. I mean, people buying things they don't really need or will use for the sake of buying things is definitely a thing. 'Getting on the internet and looking for something to want', as my cousin once put it. I can agree that's not a particularly good use of one's money. But I'm genuinely curious as to what would be, in your opinion, ideal ways for people to spend their free time if they cut spending in the ways that you suggest? Most hobbies and interests are going to require some investment of money, to varying degrees.

And sometimes it's not so much the 'thing' that makes me happy but that the 'thing' facilitates happiness because I'm sharing it or the experience with another person or other people. The occasional movie, going out to dinner, video games...I would enjoy these things on my own but the real value to me is enjoying them with my spouse. Certainly save up, maybe make some investments, consider your non-essential purchases...but if you're doing all of that and it's not going to put you in danger of being unable to pay your bills and put food on the table, then why not live a little?

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Perhaps I will annoy someone by trying to un-derail things, but I feel like the "pet peeve" thread is not really the best place to discuss global economics vs personal finance. Nor is it really a great place to judge internet strangers on doing their personal best to try to make certain spending decisions, especially given often very individual and specific circumstances that may be hard or inappropriate to describe.


Not annoyed here. *helps to try and push the thread back on its original tracks*


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Bones that leave their natural positions. Also cartilage that doesn't stay where it should.

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Subluxated ribs and vertebrae are quite the nuisance in particular.

For what it's worth, I've had great luck with chiropractors. And by "luck" I mean "I'm not sure I would be able to walk or run well or work without pain without having had their intervention." Strongly recommend them (although some are too hippy dippy to bear; but there are more where those came from), especially as a consult before considering surgery, and a lot of them either take insurance and/or offer fair rates to those whose insurance doesn't cover chiropractic.

Dark Archive

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Vanykrye wrote:
Bones that leave their natural positions. Also cartilage that doesn't stay where it should.

The human body in general annoys me with it's weird design.

I had a tumor the size of a golf ball in my brain.

I got it chopped out, and life goes on. (Six page laundry list of life-changing side-effects redacted, because even *I* find them tiresome.)

But I didn't particularly need a growth in the middle of my brain that is not, in fact, more brain. That's just bad design.

It sucks, because I could have totally used more brain! Or a third eyeball. Anything, really, but no, it was just useless gray fibrous tissue. Why does my body even have the blueprints to make 'useless tissue?' Throw out that recipe, body! I forbid you to make any more of that!


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I hate that it's possible to bite the inside of my own mouth.

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