What's something weird that annoys you?


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Windows bothers me altogether.

There need to be more games that aren't casual crap on the Chrome OS. Love my Chromebook.


I must admit that I’m impressed by Microsoft’s sheer audacity in charging for Windows, when Linux is both better and free.

I’ve no advice for playing games on a Chromebook, but perhaps the Chromebook community has stepped in where game developers failed you? Worth asking a search engine, at least.


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I got a big one: people who get offended on someone ELSE's behalf even if the original person is bothered by it. Not only is it obnoxiously self-righteous, it's rather patronizing to the person in question, as it implies they don't have the right to decide for themselves what to get offended by.

Shadow Lodge

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Asmodeus' Advocate wrote:
I must admit that I’m impressed by Microsoft’s sheer audacity in charging for Windows, when Linux is both better and free.

Linux is also severely more complex, far less user-friendly, not automatically compatible with other programs (such as games), and doesn't come pre-installed on most computers. You're essentially paying for convenience.


You mean I'm supposed to be paying for my Win10 (miserable) OS? Or the other Windows programs like Outlook and Microsoft Word?

Shadow Lodge

The pre-installed version have their price covered as part of a computer's purchase price, I imagine.

This is more if you want to buy Windows to put on a computer you made yourself, or to update an older installation that you don't have a free upgrade for.


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Oh, ok. I'm glad it came preinstalled on my laptop. If I can get my tower PC running again it has Win7 on it. You know, an OS that works.

Sovereign Court

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Hot dogs coming in packs of ten and buns in packs of 8.


Orthos wrote:
Asmodeus' Advocate wrote:
I must admit that I’m impressed by Microsoft’s sheer audacity in charging for Windows, when Linux is both better and free.
Linux is also severely more complex, far less user-friendly, not automatically compatible with other programs (such as games), and doesn't come pre-installed on most computers. You're essentially paying for convenience.

*shrug*

You're also paying for spyware and a host of programs you'll never run. And paying for the convenience of having to learn an entirely different set of commands to type into your terminal, because Windows is special that way.

I can't really speak to Linux's user-friendliness - obviously it varies by distribution. I don't know that I'd agree that Windows 10 is user-friendly; it makes me want to throw things out of frustration. That could just be because I'm not used to it and don't know where anything is (and can't find anything through the terminal, because Windows is special that way), but I didn't have any problem figuring out where everything was on Ubuntu, which really is user-friendly. Whatever the case, updates that bork your computer hardly strike me as a convenience worth paying for.


DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Andostre wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
People who preface asking a question with the word "Question."
What if they say "I have a question for you," before they ask the question?
That doesn't bother me, oddly enough.

But it's the same thing!


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This morning when I'm carrying three bags and heading to the escalator on my way up to the office, and some dude carrying nothing but his phone which he's staring into while oblivious to everything else reaches the escalator just before me and then stops, preventing me from climbing up at my own pace.


Andostre wrote:
This morning when I'm carrying three bags and heading to the escalator on my way up to the office, and some dude carrying nothing but his phone which he's staring into while oblivious to everything else reaches the escalator just before me and then stops, preventing me from climbing up at my own pace.

As a non-cellphone owner this drives me crazy. Quite frustrating when folks block an aisle at the grocery store, block a walking path, or block anything in general. The worst part, if you politely ask them to move they just look at you like you just insulted their mother.


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Andostre wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Andostre wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
People who preface asking a question with the word "Question."
What if they say "I have a question for you," before they ask the question?
That doesn't bother me, oddly enough.
But it's the same thing!

I'm a complicated man.

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
PT.B=The Devil wrote:
Andostre wrote:
This morning when I'm carrying three bags and heading to the escalator on my way up to the office, and some dude carrying nothing but his phone which he's staring into while oblivious to everything else reaches the escalator just before me and then stops, preventing me from climbing up at my own pace.
As a non-cellphone owner this drives me crazy. Quite frustrating when folks block an aisle at the grocery store, block a walking path, or block anything in general. The worst part, if you politely ask them to move they just look at you like you just insulted their mother.

I feel the same way when a group of people walk out a door and just stop to talk to each other. Right in front of the doorway. Completely technology free rudeness.


TriOmegaZero wrote:
PT.B=The Devil wrote:
Andostre wrote:
This morning when I'm carrying three bags and heading to the escalator on my way up to the office, and some dude carrying nothing but his phone which he's staring into while oblivious to everything else reaches the escalator just before me and then stops, preventing me from climbing up at my own pace.
As a non-cellphone owner this drives me crazy. Quite frustrating when folks block an aisle at the grocery store, block a walking path, or block anything in general. The worst part, if you politely ask them to move they just look at you like you just insulted their mother.
I feel the same way when a group of people walk out a door and just stop to talk to each other. Right in front of the doorway. Completely technology free rudeness.

Yeap, that happens too. I'm not sure if large segments of the pop have lost their sense of public space and function, or maybe they just never had any?

Shadow Lodge

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No respect, I tell ya, no respect.

Dark Archive

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TriOmegaZero wrote:
I feel the same way when a group of people walk out a door and just stop to talk to each other. Right in front of the doorway. Completely technology free rudeness.

Or the supermarket. You're trying to get dinner and get gone, and two people have parked their carts to block the aisle and are exchanging their life histories. Ugh. Go catch up in the cafe, people, I'm here to shop!


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
People who preface asking a question with the word "Question."

Sometimes I'll shout in response: "Answer!"


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So do I.

Shadow Lodge

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Asmodeus' Advocate wrote:
Orthos wrote:
Asmodeus' Advocate wrote:
I must admit that I’m impressed by Microsoft’s sheer audacity in charging for Windows, when Linux is both better and free.
Linux is also severely more complex, far less user-friendly, not automatically compatible with other programs (such as games), and doesn't come pre-installed on most computers. You're essentially paying for convenience.

*shrug*

You're also paying for spyware and a host of programs you'll never run. And paying for the convenience of having to learn an entirely different set of commands to type into your terminal, because Windows is special that way.

I don't think most people who use Windows - the more casual users - ever use terminal commands. I certainly never have.

And that's kind of my point. Windows isn't designed for someone who knows how to use terminal commands, not really. It's designed for the commonplace user who doesn't even know what terminal commands are. That's what I mean by more user-friendly than Linux. Windows is literally just point and click and go. No actual computing knowledge required to use.


I don't even know what those are.

Shadow Lodge

This thing. Old DOS-style commands.


Ohhh...Ok. I've seen and used a few of them. Just been nearly 20 years ago when training for a job in IT that fell through.


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Orthos wrote:

I don't think most people who use Windows - the more casual users - ever use terminal commands. I certainly never have.

And that's kind of my point. Windows isn't designed for someone who knows how to use terminal commands, not really. It's designed for the commonplace user who doesn't even know what terminal commands are. That's what I mean by more user-friendly than Linux. Windows is literally just point and click and go. No actual computing knowledge required to use.

Ah, well, terminal commands are hella convenient. But I might've weakened my position by mentioning them - there're a lot of Linux distros that are as easy to navigate by mouse or touchpad as Windows.

Ubuntu's is also point and click and go - no computing knowledge required. It's what I recommend to people jaded with Windows but aren't interested in hassle.

I've no personal experience with Zorin OS, but I've heard good things about it. Zorin OS was designed specifically to be easy for Windows refugees to use - it comes predownloaded with all the bloat, er, all the programs you could ever need - and a lot of programs you couldn't ever need, too. Like Windows, except it doesn't harvest your data. And it's more secure. And faster. And vastly more secure, but that comes with the territory of not being Windows. Zorin OS comes with Wine and PlayOnLinux installed, too, which saves a new user the minimal time and effort it'd take to install those on a different distro. But, what I'm saying is, it's out-of-the-box compatible with other programs, like games.

When you pay for Windows, you're basically paying for convenience, sure - the convenience of not looking up an online tutorial on how to download the Linux distro you want. But if you're willing to spend an afternoon upgrading your operating system, Ubuntu's better than Windows if you're willing to download programs as you find out you need them, and Zorin OS (I'm told) is better if you aren't. There's no reason to use Windows 10. It's bad, the company's toxic, it's insecure, Microsoft's recording what you do on it, it's slow, it's bad.


Games that advertise "playing this 10 minutes a day will make you smarter"


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Technically true of any game. Improved hand eye coordinating and visual processing count.


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Yeah technically anything you do makes you smarter except you know things that damage your brain.


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Nonsense. The Trepanner DLC for PUBG iz moaney whell spint. Heir kooling mak muh thinky-thinky go fast-fasty now. {drools quietly}


People who dismiss the idea of cryonic preservation out of hand annoy me, a little. But mostly, they make me sad.

Dark Archive

I prefer alternative methods.


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Orthos, Post-Singularity wrote:
I prefer alternative methods.

D’ya have a timetable for when we can expect a friendly superintelligence? Chillaxing in a vat of liquid nitrogen sounds like the solidest plan for lasting long enough to see a post-scarcity future, perhaps as robots. (Though, “uploading” oneself does raise disquieting questions of continuity.)


DMC's very inconvenient day: I have a fever, my sinuses are trying to exsanguinate me, I've pulled a muscle underneath my right shoulder blade, and my toilet is backed up. Again. And my laptop is about to bork, I'm afraid. That would leave me without a computer as my tower unit is dead. I rely on my laptop for game nights. The next one is 10 days away and I've been working on it all day, with many delays to restart it and get rid of the problem temporarily.

Sigh...a very inconvenient day. Good night, Housemates.


The whole "dying of hypothermia" issue might throw a kink into the entire cryogenics process. Maybe I don't know enough about biology, but doesn't extreme cold, you know, kill life?

Shadow Lodge

I'm not averse to giving the hypercryonics thing a shot, but I'd really want to see some actual proof of someone being resuscitated from it first. As is, I have to lean a bit more toward VE's stance - it might be possible in the future (much like every anti-death solution, really) but as of now it's more hypothesis than proven procedure.


I'm sorry, Dungeonmaster. :(

If there's anything I can do from halfway across the continent, let me know.

The Vagrant Erudite wrote:
The whole "dying of hypothermia" issue might throw a kink into the entire cryogenics process. Maybe I don't know enough about biology, but doesn't extreme cold, you know, kill life?

I can't put things as eloquently as Tim Urban. So, here's a link to a thing he wrote, which is eloquent: Why Cryonics Makes Sense. Still, I'll give it the old college try.

The basic idea behind cryopreservation is that the future is going to be a magical place. And that's hard to dispute. A society that's developed an artificial superintelligence (something that'll happen inevitably, think many) won't have any limits to what they can do besides the immutable laws of physics.

Even a society without superintelligence, had they perfected the field of nanomedicine, would be immortal unless killed, able to repair or replace cells individually, and target viruses and bacteria with extreme precision. And this is stuff that's being developed, stuff that will likely be as ubiquitous in the coming decades as the internet became over these past few.

Which is great for people in the future. Really great for them. Congratulations, future people, on being immortal. But it's kind of a raw deal for us, who're likely to bite the dust before that kind of technology is cheap enough for the masses to use.

So, the basic idea of cryopreservation is, yes, you die. Inconvenient, all around. Tragic. But as long as your brain is preserved, the future, which as we've established is a magical place (and maybe it isn't coming soon. Maybe the future is a magic place a long, long way down the road. But as long as humanity persists, the future will become more magical, and eventually it'll be magical enough), will have the nanomedicine it'd take to repair the cells of your brain, or create a perfect model of how your neurons connect for recreation (re-creation, not recreation . . . but maybe both?), and then you wake up, wake up from a very long nap, during which you were dead.

Orthos wrote:
I'm not averse to giving the hypercryonics thing a shot, but I'd really want to see some actual proof of someone being resuscitated from it first. As is, I have to lean a bit more toward VE's stance - it might be possible in the future (much like every anti-death solution, really) but as of now it's more hypothesis than proven procedure.

Well, that's kind of the problem, isn't it? If we could resuscitate cryopreserved people, we wouldn't need to cryopreserve them in the first place. We could use our advanced technology to fix whatever it is that's killing them in the first place, be it age or cancer or blunt-force trauma.

So it's a hypothesis. The hypothesis is, that if you vitrify your brain, fill it with antifreeze and then lower it's temperature slowly enough that rather than crystallizing and exploding your cells it becomes one mass of glass-like solid, if you vitrify your brain, the hypothesis is that one day in the future humanity will have invented the technology it takes to repair that brain, on account of all the connections still being there. That's the hypothesis. And an experiment has been devised to test that hypothesis.

Ralph Merkle puts it best; “The clinical trials are in progress. Come back in a century and we’ll give you an answer based on the outcome. The relevant question for those of us who don’t expect to live that long is: 'Would I rather be in the control group, or the experimental group?'"

I'd rather be in the experimental group, myself. Because I know what happens to the control group. It ain't pretty.

Like I said earlier, people who reject cryonics out of hand annoy me a little, but mostly make me sad. They make me sad because I've had some variation on this conversation with a truly staggering number of people. Not most everyone I'm on first name basis with, I typed that and then I backspaced it because it wasn't true. But everyone that I've ever spent an afternoon just talking to, people I know, we've had the cryonics talk. And nothing ever comes of it. I keep it up, though, because.

The future's a magical place.

Hope to see you there.


I feel the same way about interstellar travel.


Asmodeus' Advocate wrote:

I'm sorry, Dungeonmaster. :(

If there's anything I can do from halfway across the continent, let me know.

Thanks! The thought is as appreciated as an action.

Dark Archive

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Conrad Verner wrote:
I feel the same way about interstellar travel.

I love me some futuristic sci-fi in the vein of Star Wars or Star Trek, with a bunch of humans and aliens interacting and zipping around the galaxy, invading planets and pillaging water/gold/women, but gosh, it's all just as fantastic as magic and dragons to me.

We are on the cusp, here on Earth, of being able to '3D print' just about anything, and even nano-assemble *food.* The only true barriers to a resource-free society are political, at this point. The idea that aliens would be capable of travelling interstellar distances, and come here to *steal resources* is just laughable, since, to have that sort of technology, they'd already have the means of creating anything they want in endless quantities, and they passed planets with oceans of liquid diamond to get here.

The only possible thing we have to offer to a culture that advanced is entertainment.

And hopefully, it's 'watch our old Honeymooners episodes' entertainment, and not '200 quatloos on the newcomer' entertainment...

The only way, without folding space somehow (like Star Trek's warp drive or Star Wars hyperdrive or Babylon 5's stargates), that we are getting out of this solar system, is frozen in a box to be revived 10,000 years later at our destination, or beamed as data to be downloaded into a new body constructed at the target site (which may not resemble our original bodies in the slightest, depending on the environment there). And that's probably the way we'd meet aliens, in bodies they've grown for the occasion, leaving us to wonder what they *really* look like.


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*scuttles over incomprehensible hopes of long-extinct primates*


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When I post something to the rules forum and explicitly say "This has to be Pathfinder-official rules only, no 3rd party supplements or GM houserules" and I get responses like "Well here's this 3rd party supplement" or "Have your GM houserule it" or "I found this 3x5 card once on the floor of a convention back in '87. It was blotchy with Mountain Dew stains and Cheetos finger prints, but I think it was notes on a rule by some developer for the defunct Chivalry & Sorcery RPG that will allow you to do what you're thinking about."


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lol that reminds me of a time when a poster asked how to make a cool character that uses a rapier and was told to make a monk with piercing fist...

Oh and everytime a thread opens about making the joker every poster starts by dumping charisma...

Dark Archive

Batmanisapaladin.

Hanshotbetter.


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Wot's all this then?


Tableflip McRagequit wrote:
When I post something to the rules forum and explicitly say "This has to be Pathfinder-official rules only, no 3rd party supplements or GM houserules" and I get responses like "Well here's this 3rd party supplement" or "Have your GM houserule it" or "I found this 3x5 card once on the floor of a convention back in '87. It was blotchy with Mountain Dew stains and Cheetos finger prints, but I think it was notes on a rule by some developer for the defunct Chivalry & Sorcery RPG that will allow you to do what you're thinking about."

That. Is. The. Worst.


Guilty.


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NOOOO!

*flip*


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

I like to ask what adventure path we should run, exclude a few on purpose and watch all the recommendations for the few I excluded roll in, either that or they say we should run modules instead.


When people refer to sex as "the nasty", as it implies sex is evil somehow (a viewpoint as stupid as it is dangerous).

Shadow Lodge

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I figured it was less claiming it was evil and more because it's messy and kinda gross.

(Disclaimer: Orthos has not actually had sex and is asexual so his opinions may not be shared by others of different experience and/or orientation.)


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

It's not messy or gross if you shower beforehand.

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