The Mandalorian


Television

251 to 296 of 296 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | next > last >>

Werthead wrote:
Irontruth wrote:

I would disagree.

I would agree that in Ep 4, this was definitely true. EP 1-3, there was no Kurosawa fanfic. No one should insult Kurosawa by saying that 1-3 were tributes to his movies. I am fully aware of all of the elements Lucas took from Hidden Fortress for Ep 4. I am also fully aware of precisely how he abandoned those tropes in the prequels.

There are direct scene tributes in the PT to Kurosawa. In Revenge of the Sith, Kenobi looking down at Anakain from the ramp of Padme's ship before their final duel is identical to a shot of Mifune in the early part of The Hidden Fortress.

The Phantom Menace is also much more of a direct match to The Hidden Fortress than the original Star Wars: a wisened general (Mifune/Neeson) works to escape enemy territory alongside a young princess (Uehara/Portman) so she might save her people. Along the way there is subterfuge involving the princess and her handmaid (Keira Knightley's character in Phantom, the short-lived Corde in Clones).

There are also strong stylistic similarities between Phantom Menace and Kagemusha (ironically, a movie co-funded by Lucas) through its use of decoys and doubles, with Lucas ultimately using the translation of the title (The Shadow War) as an episode of The Clone Wars.

1. An episode title of Clone Wars is irrelevant to whether or not PM was able to utilize ideas from a Kurosawa movie. Clone Wars happened years AFTER, and was a tv show, and NOT the movie The Phantom Menace. If you have to reach to a different series, then you're already conceding that PM failed. (Yes, I know you did make points about PM, but I am addressing this specifically first, since it is the MOST fallacious).

2. Nothing you described about the Phantom Menace is MORE of a tribute to Hidden Fortress than Ep 4. They're the same, or similar, beats, except everything in PM falls apart if you start to tug at it, even from within the context of Star Wars. None of it makes sense. Characters do things because the script tells them to, not because their character is established and behaving as that character should. For christ's sake, the Phantom Menace doesn't even have a protagonist, the most basic and essentially element to a story.

Who is not the protagonist?
Well, it can't be Anakin. The first half of the movie isn't about him. It doesn't set up anything about him, and he doesn't appear in any of it.
It can't be Qui-Gon, he doesn't have a character arc. The only time he "changes" is when he is killed. His character is no longer living, and that represents the only "growth" his character engages in.
It can't be Padme, she doesn't make any decisions. She's ferried about, gives a speech that has no impact, then is ferried back to her homeworld where OTHER people fight for it.
It doesn't seem like Obi-Wan, though he's possible the best candidate. There is almost some form of growth, as his situation changes (qui-gon's growth into death), and he now has to become a mentor to someone else... but for the whole movie he doesn't really do anything other than play QG's sidekick. He doesn't really make any decisions, he's just a character who asks questions so the audience can hear QG's answer. And as for his and Anakin's relationship, Obi-wan spends the whole second half of the movie (since Anakin isn't in the first half) being annoyed at the kid and not thinking he's important at all.
It's not Jar-Jar, he's the comic relief rabbit who steps in the poopy.

In contrast, Luke goes through what is called a "character arc" and this helps define him as the protagonist. He starts off as a farm boy who dreams of adventure. He even wants to go to the Academy, presumably where he'd learn to fly TIE Fighters (to me, the Academy sounds like a military school, and the Empire is the primary military venue in the fiction). He then meets a wise old man who knew his father. They set off to rescue a princess, where Luke learns to take action and be brave. When his mentor dies, he thinks all hope is lost. He knows he has to fight the Empire, and does so, but with his mentor's advice, he overcomes a moment of impossible odds. From a farm boy with a boring life to the hero of the rebellion! That's a protagonist with an arc.

And before I hear the "it's for kids" argument, I've watched a decent amount of children's TV and Movies. They pretty much always have a protagonist. Why? Because it's a really fundamental part of telling a story. Kurosawa knew this. He knew it so well, he was one of the first filmmakers to experiment with altering what a protagonist was in Rashomon. The Phantom Menace was NOT Rashomon.

I like bad movies sometimes. I mean, I sat through The Mechanic 2 and had zero regrets. I'll probably even watch it again some day. I understand it is a bad movie, and don't try to convince people it was good though.


So... I feel like IT really doesn't think there's much of a thread between the PT and Kurosawa. Also, and I could be off here, but it seems like Truthiness here isn't really a fan of the prequels in general.

The Mandalorian, on the other hand, gets pretty good marks from most folks in this thread, so that's good. I saw a YouTube piece last night though that suggested that Ahsoka didn't do ANYTHING on the show other than show up to get her name out there and setup her spin off.

I thought she fit the formula the show has established in S2 though - add a character that really doesn't do that much to help Mando or Grogu, but their payoff is coming elsewhere. Bo Katan will have to wait til S3 for her own shining moments; Boba Fett had some cool fight scenes but really didn't alter the course of events between the Moff and Mando being in possession of the Child.

So, Ahsoka will shine elsewhere. Big deal. This was leveled like a criticism of The Mandalorian or the "Disney machine" itself but 2 things - 1, Disney is a business and must drive viewership and increase revenue, and 2, the show is about Din Djarin so he's the one that resolves conflicts and furthers the plot, as it has been from the beginning.

What do you all think? Did Ahsoka not serve a purpose, or was she somehow just a piece of set dressing?


I would agree that Ahsoka didn't do much, but then again, any character in Mando who is only there for 1 episode... doesn't do much. The show isn't about them, and so they don't get much of an arc.

Her purpose was to establish a few things about the universe (within the context of the show) and move on. It was too early in the season to solve the central problem

I think Boba Fett was more interesting. While Fett didn't "do" much in the sense of having a story, he greatly advanced Mando's personal development. Mando's interaction with Fett is what led to him taking his helmet off at the refinery. The fanaticism of Mandalorian culture that Mando followed/represented ("this is the way") is being peeled back to reveal Mando's own personality. He's discovering his own way, and Fett was a big part of that.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Irontruth wrote:

I would agree that Ahsoka didn't do much, but then again, any character in Mando who is only there for 1 episode... doesn't do much. The show isn't about them, and so they don't get much of an arc.

Her purpose was to establish a few things about the universe (within the context of the show) and move on. It was too early in the season to solve the central problem

I think Boba Fett was more interesting. While Fett didn't "do" much in the sense of having a story, he greatly advanced Mando's personal development. Mando's interaction with Fett is what led to him taking his helmet off at the refinery. The fanaticism of Mandalorian culture that Mando followed/represented ("this is the way") is being peeled back to reveal Mando's own personality. He's discovering his own way, and Fett was a big part of that.

I want to be really clear here that this is an opinion and means no disrespect IT... but I'd disagree.

I feel that working with Bo Katan first opened Din's eyes to different choices in being a Mandalorian. Then there's his attachment to Grogu… an attachment he didn't FULLY, consciously realize was reciprocated as much as it is until a Jedi named Ahsoka looked into the Child's mind.

In my opinion the reason why Mando is questioning The Way is because if being a Mandalorian is a creed, a statement he made in season 1 I think, then all different people take that creed. Bo showed him that there's no one way to stay true to it. Remember that Din Djarin was a foundling, while, if he believes Bo Katan in the episode she meets him, is a native of Mandalore and one of significant importance before the Purge.

Boba Fett might reinforce all that, show him yet another way to be, but Bo is the real catalyst, in my opinion.

Finally, Ahsoka had one very specific job - she told Mando the Child's name. As soon as he learns it, saying it is like a magic word for Din; later in the cockpit of his ship Mando says "Grogu" and when the kid responds he audibly laughs!

Until this point he had a vague notion that the Child was listening to him, and on at least 2 occasions he knew that the kid was protecting him, but there was still this separation between them. Knowing Grogu's name, knowing definitively that Grogu CARES about him, so deeply that the kid CAN'T go be with his people, the Jedi... those bound Mando and Grogu together in the final way. Grogu was no longer a mission or a foundling... he was MANDO's mission, MANDO's foundling.

Ahsoka gave him that.

Ahsoka served the same purpose in the Mandalorian, IMO, that she has in Rebels and to a smaller degree in Clone Wars. She is the glue, the method through which other characters in the drama find each other. She gives the folks she interacts with permission to be vulnerable, to form attachments, to genuinely care about each other.

The Jedi abhor attachments; Mando and his comrades are work buddies; the band in Rebels are shipmates, until Ahsoka shows them all that it's ok to get close, to care, to know each other's names and tell each other they're proud of one another and such. Even though Ahsoka regrets in the Mandalorian what forming such attachments did for her former master, Anakin, her very nature is to care for others and give those around her license to feel the same.

Ahsoka gave Grogu his identity back. She took that and handed it like a gift to Din Djarin. Din and Grogu then afterwards began a quest, a need to genuinely know each other, culminating in Mando taking his helmet off and showing his true face to the Child. And the hand of Grogu, on Din's face, causing the brave Mandalorian to close his eyes and cry, as if Grogu was saying right back, in his own way, "I'm proud of you too dad."

That's what Ahsoka did.

At least, in my opinion.


You're saying the same thing about Ahsoka that I did, but with more words.

Her actions were to convey information. She didn't make decisions that altered the course of the story. She didn't have an arc (ie, start in one state and then end up in a very different one). She finished a task, but within the context of the episode she didn't change at all. To clarify, yes "talking" is a verb and technically "doing" something, but in the context of storytelling, dialogue is usually considered a passive thing to do. Most of her dialogue was exposition, and it was done decently well, but I would not consider exposition "doing something". It has it's own term... exposition. It was good exposition in that it didn't feel like a wall of text, but I still wouldn't count that as an action within a story.

I'm going to disagree on Bo Katan. Dealing with Bo Katan didn't push Mando to change. He saw her as being almost alien to him. I could see an argument that she loosened the jar for Fett, but Mando didn't see Katan as being a member of his community. He saw her as a means to an ends. She ridicules his beliefs, and in my opinion you can almost feel him double down on "this is the way". The encounter does open up the possibility of taking his helmet off, but only that it is possible, not that it would appeal to Mando in any way.

Compare this to the first conversation with Fett. As Mando interrogates him, Mando is seeing more and more of himself in Fett. Fett's life and Mando's life have strong parallels. The son of a foundling and a foundling. Men who honor their deals. Loners who have allies, and get the job done. Fett's comfort with not having his helmet on, and no shame that he isn't wearing it, is life-changing for Mando. It's a person who is like him, but isn't confined to the rules dictated to him by others.

If Mando takes his helmet off because Bo Katan says so, he's just exchanging one cultural authority for another. He rejects her way of life in both episodes she's in. Mando instead embraces Fett's mercenary attitude that he has to be true to his own goals, and not the goals of others. His removal of the helmet is practical and goal oriented, not ideological.

From a story perspective, the first meeting with Bo Katan does signal that his helmet will be coming off more in the future. The character rejects this behavior though and requires a different source of permission to do it.

edit: added a clarifying bit about Ashoka and exposition.


Mark Hoover 330 wrote:

....Ahsoka had one very specific job - she told Mando the Child's name. As soon as he learns it, saying it is like a magic word for Din; later in the cockpit of his ship Mando says "Grogu" and when the kid responds he audibly laughs!

....Ahsoka gave him that.

Ahsoka served the same purpose in the Mandalorian, IMO, that she has in Rebels and to a smaller degree in Clone Wars. She is the glue, the method through which other characters in the drama find each other. She gives the folks she interacts with permission to be vulnerable, to form attachments, to genuinely care about each other.....

Precisely!

In theory all Jedi are empaths but she consistently acts like one (and yeah I know she's not technically a Jedi but she's still a Space Wizard trained by the Jedi Order so whatever). That episode was very well written and I'm looking forward to Ahsoka in her own show*.

*The show runner for Batwoman ought to take a lesson from this show to see how to present compelling characters instead of retched caricatures.

Dark Archive

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Mark Hoover 330 wrote:
What do you all think? Did Ahsoka not serve a purpose, or was she somehow just a piece of set dressing?

She felt like nostalgiac fan-service to me, and I totally bought it, hook line and sinker, because I am absolutely here for it. (I watched Rebels only because Thrawn was in it, so I am a terribly uncritical Star Wars fan, easily led around by feelgood moments and pandering to my 'expanded universe' favorites.)


1 person marked this as a favorite.

As someone who'd never watched Clone Wars, my reaction to Askoka's presence in the show was, "Cool! A female Jedi!"

I didn't even know what her name was until the end credits rolled.


I always felt the Jedi code felt fairly Samuraish to me. more so Buddhist then anything.


You know, as far as Darth Vader wanna bes go, I rather like Moff Gideon.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I like Gideon too, but y'know who I really liked? Valin Hess. We see imperial officers all the time - stony faced, or fearful of their superiors, doing what they HAVE to in order to do their jobs. They are cold and cunning.

Valin Hess was a good villain, in that I was really satisfied as a fan when he was defeated. Why? Because he ENJOYED what the Empire does. Ugh, his monologue sent an absolute chill down my spine.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Starfinder Society Subscriber

I got caught up over the weekend. I managed to stay almost completely spoiler free for the intervening weeks prior to watching the second half of the season all in one go.

As someone who isn't highly invested in Star Wars (just watched the mainline movies), I thought it was pretty great overall. Highlights:

  • The feeling of a big, complicated world beyond the struggles of our titular character.
  • Well written plots. Things get set up beforehand and the stakes are pretty clear. I felt this was the weakest part of the sequel trilogy, so it was so so satisfying to see it done well here.
  • The empire remnants actually getting some real characterization. Episode 7 was a particular high point, especially the scene where our protagonists enter the base to the cheers of the troopers within. And also the tense scene with the officer's fanatical idealism of law and order.
  • Grogu eating tadpole eggs. Really gave me a gnawing thought of "With force powers, this little guy could really grow into a monster if there's no one to teach him." Actually all of episode 2 really. Mando and frog lady struggling with the language barrier. The New Republic's characterization as "Lawful Good", showing them as adversaries and allies. Really tense ep.
  • The development of the father-son relationship between man and cute puppet. :)

    Lowlights:

  • Episode 1 was downright boring. I had really low expectations after that one.
  • Episode 8 felt padded. Long extended action scenes that I just couldn't get invested in. Still very much enjoyed the emotional scenes with Din and Grogu, Luke's satisfying performance (though the CG deaging still makes the scenes where he's talking super awkward and stilted), and the general wrap up.

    Episode 8 disappointments:
    The "dream team" just kinda walks in guns blazing and takes down what felt like endless amounts of storm troopers. They just keep walking through corridors for a while, mostly in the open, while everything around them goes down. After earlier episodes that involved taking cover and working out tricky plans to overcome groups of storm troopers, this felt kinda limp.

    The robo-troopers were head scratchers, consider how they fall into the "powerful but dumb" category of foes. Like, one fighting Mando just keeps grinding his obviously unbreakable helmet into the wall, rather than try taking it off or anything more productive. I expect when foes are presented as "powerful but dumb" the weaker heroes use their smarts to overcome them. But in this case, uh, they don't even try to?

    Gideon's motives and actions baffle me even now. After being built up over a bunch of episodes, he seems to do a lot of silly things here, culminating in him attacking the sole person with good defenses against the darksaber. Someone who'd JUST agreed to let him live. This just really didn't land for me.

    I 1000% expected Bo Katan to fight Mando for the darksaber. It would have been a satisfying counterpoint to their different motives in attacking Gideon's ship. It obviously doesn't have to be to the death or anything, so I'm not sure why she just stands there conflicted instead.


  • Moff Gideon:
    I think the reason he attacks Din is b/c he knows the character and situation as well as he does. 1. Bo needs to win the Darksaber in combat, which means 2. Bo needs to fight him to take it for herself, so 3. if Din is facing him then that means Bo wants him taken alive so that she CAN fight him for the saber or that Bo was otherwise expecting to face him elsewhere. In any case, losing to Din means he'll likely be captured and questioned, not immediately killed, so he gets to stay alive while Bo Katan and Mando duke it out over the Darksaber

    The Dream Team:
    This part baffled me too. Like, EVERYTHING that has to do with Storm Troopers baffles me. The very FIRST thing we hear, from Obi Wan in Ep 4 about Storm Troopers is that they are good shots. Every instance of them on screen, from A New Hope until this series, shows them as an entire army of Red Shirts, knocked over with the slightest nudge.

    Sure, in other episodes cover was employed against them as well as strategy, but no one really ever HAD to, as this episode reinforces. Folks, they're wearing full body armor and they can be knocked out by getting KICKED IN THE FACE! I mean, WHAT? At least when Boba Fett is hitting them with his banta stick at least we see the impact breaking the armor. In this final episode one guy is straight up kicked and goes down. In body armor.

    What is the point of Storm Troopers? They aren't the "precise" shooters Obi Wan said they are. They're not bright, they don't have very good hand-to-hand skills, they often use formations that are terrible for their environment, they're just not really good soldiers.

    Anyway, back to the Dream Team. They had so much plot armor in this episode it was off putting. Are we to believe that four people, one with a malfunctioning blaster, can stride purposefully through wave after wave of Imperial troopers like so much flotsam in a garbage compactor? We've seen Han and Chewie run from them in the same numbers, in a nearly identical tactical environment. Is the magic number 4?

    I think that must be what it is, the number 4. The Dream Team crossing the bridge over the space exit: when there's just 2 of them, they're in real trouble, but then the other 2 with jet packs come up and POOF! Insta-win!

    For good trooper action, go watch the cartoon of the Clone Wars. Those were clone troopers, but they were pretty cool fights to watch.

    For a cynical summation to some of your concerns Lion of Cel, I'd say the short answer is "because some things need to happen for spin offs." Disney's gotta make that paper and keep eyeballs on screens, so plot armor happens, narrative decisions are made, and so on.


    Pathfinder Starfinder Society Subscriber

    Gideon:
    I understand that rationale, it just doesn't make satisfy on a plot logic basis OR on an emotional basis.

    Din and Gideon face down, and after a tense moment its clear that they don't actually have any disagreement with one another. Din doesn't want the darksaber and Gideon already got what he wanted from Grogu. So far so good. Din's willing to let Gideon go because he cares more about Grogu than beating bad guys up. Gideon now has a clear path to escape, and considering that his ship has been taken over by the Dream Team, that should look like a good option. But instead of escaping, he attacks Din.

    Emotionally, I don't get it. I could see Din attacking Gideon - after all, the dude kidnapped his kid and Din might be vindictive - but I don't see the motivation for Gideon's attack. Din's not in his way and Gideon has no beef with him as far as I can tell.

    There's definitely a lot of "things happening because spin offs" but it's done reasonably elegantly in other episodes.


    1 person marked this as a favorite.
    Cellion wrote:

    ** spoiler omitted **

    There's definitely a lot of "things happening because spin offs" but it's done reasonably elegantly in other episodes.

    Spoiler:
    While I don't disagree, Gideon's most prudent course of action was running to fight another day, 2 things to remember. 1. He was convinced, beyond the shadow of a doubt, that his Dark Troopers would return to save him, and 2. the Moff knows that Bo Katan will not stop coming after him and the Darksaber.

    So I look at his calculation like this: "Bo and Din are both Mandalorians and likely to fight about this weapon if he beats me in combat. They'll take me hostage and then begin fighting about the saber. In the ensuing squabble, my Dark Troopers will return and finish these annoyances off for me, once and for all. Then, when the dust settles, I'll have my life, a still-functioning ship, some if not all of my Dark Troopers, and the saber that positions me as supreme to all remaining Mandalorians." Now, there are holes there and the plan isn't without risk, but if Luke Skywalker hadn't shown up it likely would have played out something like what I've put here.

    It feels like Moff Gideon's big character flaw might be pride.

    Grand Lodge

    Pathfinder Adventure, Lost Omens, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber

    Which would be an interesting parallel to Din and his pride in his upbringing.


    Mark Hoover 330 wrote:
    Cellion wrote:

    ** spoiler omitted **

    There's definitely a lot of "things happening because spin offs" but it's done reasonably elegantly in other episodes.

    ** spoiler omitted **

    It feels like Moff Gideon's big character flaw might be pride.

    Isn't that everybody's character flaw?

    Aside from some who are just plain nuts of course.


    I'm pretty sure that in the imperial army, in any incarnation, if you lose a ship that big you're fired.

    Out of an airlock.

    So at that point, he's looking at trying to play for life and honor or death and dishonor. Long-shot or no he has nothing to lose (and starwars characters seem oddly unwilling to shoot surrendered prisoners)


    BigNorseWolf wrote:

    <snip> So at that point, he's looking at trying to play for life and honor or death and dishonor. Long-shot or no he has nothing to lose (and starwars characters seem oddly unwilling to shoot surrendered prisoners)

    ...

    Why is this odd?

    ???


    Animism wrote:
    BigNorseWolf wrote:

    <snip> So at that point, he's looking at trying to play for life and honor or death and dishonor. Long-shot or no he has nothing to lose (and starwars characters seem oddly unwilling to shoot surrendered prisoners)

    ...

    Why is this odd?

    ???

    Well for starters they keep putting people that can move things with their minds in prisons with unlocked switches At some point you'd have to notice that if you want someone out of the way prisons aren't working...


    Sad face

    I mean, I get WHY and I won't say that I defend the point of view that got us here. Its just...

    I LIKE Cara Dune! She's not the typical female Disney or Star Wars character. Plus Ms Carano is an excellent physical talent in the combat-oriented series. Not to mention I've got a major fan-crush on her.

    Still, like I said, I get why. Not for nothin', but Bill Burr has said some pretty controversial stuff too, but whatever... Bottom line, I'll miss Cara Dune's character on the show.

    Grand Lodge

    7 people marked this as a favorite.
    Pathfinder Adventure, Lost Omens, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber

    I fully support the idea of recasting a transwoman to continue the character.


    I also really like the character, and I hope they recast the role for Season 3. A transwoman in the role would be great!

    Liberty's Edge RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32, 2011 Top 16

    2 people marked this as a favorite.

    I hope they don't recast. The character had a nice arc, and it's at a nice ending point. They can easily add a new character and not deal with the messiness of recasting. I'm fine with recasting if the character has large structural bearing on the plot, or that their own character arc isn't complete, but in this case, I simply don't see the need.


    And here I thought nothing could touch the Mandalorian at this point. It was flying high, in a bright sunlit sky, adored by all... the moment some people get famous they have to run their mouths and then put their foot in it...

    Scarab Sages

    I was sorry to see the actress get the boot. I really liked her character. If they recast the character, I'd actually consider not watching the show anymore. Best to just introduce some new character.

    Grand Lodge

    Pathfinder Adventure, Lost Omens, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber

    I agree that recasting for the show isn't needed. If they want to do a spin off with the character, that would be a great place to start with a new actress. But they can just write new characters and be fine.


    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    We need a new character. Her arc has completed.


    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    Yep - just let it go. Recasting really ruins immersion. Plenty of other characters around.

    Scarab Sages

    I heard a rumor (one which I very much doubt the veracity of) that Favreau is putting pressure on Disney regarding the whole Gina Carano kerfuffle. Apparently, his contract stated he had final say over hiring and firing for his show, and when Kennedy fired Carano, it violated his contract. And now he's making noise about already talking to other companies, not necessarily to get Carano back, but more to push the issue of who might be in complete charge of Star Wars - himself, or Kennedy.

    I find the whole situation humorous, if true.

    Again, take this with a giant grain of salt. Perhaps an entire mine of the stuff.


    I'm now purposely avoiding the topic on my internet searches. I clicked on one "Gina Carano was horribly mistreated by Disney" video on YouTube and now the algorithm is bombarding my feed with all these terribly opinionated channels with a decidedly... conservative aggressiveness to them.

    In that piece all I'd heard is that Jon F. had created the character for Ms Carano and he fought strongly against her suffering any consequences for past social media commentary; I didn't see anything on his contract rider.


    Honestly... she's not a good actress.


    1 person marked this as a favorite.
    Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
    Mark Hoover 330 wrote:
    I didn't see anything on his contract rider.

    I do think the giant block of salt approach is probably the best thing here. The strife between everyone and Kathleen Kennedy seems to be purely an invention of those fans who perpetuate odd conspiracy theories.

    Favreau dropped Terrence Howard for Don Cheadle for a minor monetary dispute, he continued working with Disney/Marvel when they dropped James Gunn over the moral turpitude clause in his contract, I can't imagine he'd bat much of an eye for Disney executing the same clause in Carano's contract.

    Scarab Sages

    1 person marked this as a favorite.
    dirtypool wrote:


    Favreau dropped Terrence Howard for Don Cheadle for a minor monetary dispute, he continued working with Disney/Marvel when they dropped James Gunn over the moral turpitude clause in his contract, I can't imagine he'd bat much of an eye for Disney executing the same clause in Carano's contract.

    Good points. That, and the fact I got this from someone at a get together the other day, leaves me inclined think it's just someone's wishful thinking. Personally, I like Favreau right where he is, producing quality Star Wars content.


    dirtypool wrote:
    Mark Hoover 330 wrote:
    I didn't see anything on his contract rider.

    I do think the giant block of salt approach is probably the best thing here. The strife between everyone and Kathleen Kennedy seems to be purely an invention of those fans who perpetuate odd conspiracy theories.

    Favreau dropped Terrence Howard for Don Cheadle for a minor monetary dispute, he continued working with Disney/Marvel when they dropped James Gunn over the moral turpitude clause in his contract, I can't imagine he'd bat much of an eye for Disney executing the same clause in Carano's contract.

    Really? It was him that resulted in Cheadle Machine? Oh man.

    Liberty's Edge

    2 people marked this as a favorite.

    I think Don Cheadle is fantastic in the role.


    Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
    Freehold DM wrote:
    Really? It was him that resulted in Cheadle Machine? Oh man.

    There was a dispute over how much more money Howard should get for Iron Man 2, and Howard went public about the negotiation happening.

    The next day he’s out and Cheadle is in.

    That’s just a basic contract dispute and Favreau didn’t hesitate to prioritize his film over his actor. I imagine someone saying things on social media that generates negative controversy multiple times wouldn’t get more consideration than that.


    1 person marked this as a favorite.
    Marc Radle wrote:
    I think Don Cheadle is fantastic in the role.

    "Yes. Yes, this IS Tony STANK. You're DEFINITELY in the right place. Thank you for that. *to Tony* I'm never... not going to use this. Ever."

    Yes, I'd agree that Don Cheadle is a great fit in this role.


    1 person marked this as a favorite.
    Mark Hoover 330 wrote:

    I'm now purposely avoiding the topic on my internet searches. I clicked on one "Gina Carano was horribly mistreated by Disney" video on YouTube and now the algorithm is bombarding my feed with all these terribly opinionated channels with a decidedly... conservative aggressiveness to them.

    In the future you might want to try deleting a questionable video from your watch history before refreshing or navigating back to the main page. That usually does the job for me.


    What? Delete watch history? Why, where would the world be if we weren't all siloed in our own little virtual echo chambers? How would our corporate overlords monetize us?
    :D

    Grand Lodge

    Pathfinder Adventure, Lost Omens, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber

    Via their monopolies on everything anyway.


    Oh yeah, and no doubt AI data mining will soon surpass the Tor Network obfuscatory defense anyhow. Smartphones and the "things" portion of the "Internet of things" are already mostly there of course.... Soon we'll just sit in gaming chairs, feel our asses grow, while the Brave New Big Brother feeds us our every whim* through our HD TVs and DoorDash.
    :D

    * Whims we didn't know we had until subliminally prompted.

    Customer Service Representative

    1 person marked this as a favorite.

    I've removed a few posts for trying to get around the profanity filter.

    251 to 296 of 296 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | next > last >>
    Community / Forums / Gamer Life / Entertainment / Television / The Mandalorian All Messageboards

    Want to post a reply? Sign in.
    Recent threads in Television