Prioritizing enchantments... Because magical weapons get expensive...


Advice


This came up in a few different threads that I wasn't trying to hijack with something specific.

For bows in particular, I have found whipwood to be beneficial from keeping your nice bow from being easy to sunder. In this regard, I really want to have both whipwood and the impervious special ability on my bow.

And the Orc Horn Bow is a composite bow, so Adaptive special ability is also a given.

These don't give me an enchantment bonus, so I need Corrosive, Endless Ammunition, or Phase Locking...

Corrosive can be had with gloves that don't exponentially raise the price of further enchantments to the bow.

And I really want Phase Locking for later levels. It not only stops teleportation, but also Blink, and the target can't cast Gate.

If I can get Corrosive with the gloves, so I am thinking I need Endless Ammunition as early as possible, and the other special abilities I really want.

Should I pick up Corrosive as soon as I get the masterwork whipwood Orc Horn Bow, so I can get Adaptive and Impervious without spending +2 Endless Ammunition or Phase Locking money just to get access to the special abilities I want?


Corrosive et al don't give you an enhancement bonus either. They cost the equivalent of an enhancement bonus, but you need a 'real' +1 or higher before you can add corrosive, or adaptive, or just about anything else.

Endless ammunition is a poor buy. If you want 60 durable arrows in an efficient quiver and another 200 in a handy haversack you can do that for far less cost and still never, ever run out of arrows.

For a plan try enchanting your bow as +1 first. I find seeking most useful next; YMMV. Phase locking is probably good, but the cost jump is substantial.


The Spellkiller Inquisition gets Disruptive as a bonus feat. And the Spellbreaker Inquisitor Archetype gets a thing called Foil Casting:
At 3rd level, when an opponent tries to cast an arcane spell within a Spellbreaker’s threatened area, the DC for that caster to cast defensively increases by 2. This increase stacks with the effects of the Disruptive feat. Furthermore, the Spellbreaker knows where to hit foes to foil casting from a distance. Each time she hits an arcane spellcaster or a creature that uses spell-like abilities with a ranged weapon attack, the DC of any Concentration checks the caster makes increases by 2 for 1 round.

Combined with Phase Locking on my bow, and Improved Snapshot and Improved Precise Shot, I really want to be the bane of spellcasters.


avr wrote:

Corrosive et al don't give you an enhancement bonus either. They cost the equivalent of an enhancement bonus, but you need a 'real' +1 or higher before you can add corrosive, or adaptive, or just about anything else.

Endless ammunition is a poor buy. If you want 60 durable arrows in an efficient quiver and another 200 in a handy haversack you can do that for far less cost and still never, ever run out of arrows.

For a plan try enchanting your bow as +1 first. I find seeking most useful next; YMMV. Phase locking is probably good, but the cost jump is substantial.

How does one determine which are "real" bonuses? All the lists of enchantments I have come across list Corrosive as a +1, and things like Adaptive with a price measured in GP.

What determines if it counts as the actual +1 to open up access for the special abilities that just cost gold?

Is Conserving a real +1 bonus? Or Limning?


Each time you add an enchantment to a weapon, you can either get a numerical enchantment bonus, or an enchant with some kind of effect. The ones with an effect have an equivalent + so you know how much it should cost.

If I have a normal longsword, first I need to enchant it to be a +1 longsword. Nothing else. Then later I could make it a +1 Flaming longsword. The Flaming enchant has the same effective price as adding another +1 enchantment, but doesn't actually increase the number.


CupcakeNautilus wrote:

Each time you add an enchantment to a weapon, you can either get a numerical enchantment bonus, or an enchant with some kind of effect. The ones with an effect have an equivalent + so you know how much it should cost.

If I have a normal longsword, first I need to enchant it to be a +1 longsword. Nothing else. Then later I could make it a +1 Flaming longsword. The Flaming enchant has the same effective price as adding another +1 enchantment, but doesn't actually increase the number.

Thank you for typing slowly so I could understand you better, because I'm really stupid sometimes. There was something about this process I clearly wasn't getting, and I think I got it now. Thanks again.


Maybe...

I might still be retarded...

Orc Horn Bow 130gp
Masterwork Orc Horn Bow 430gp
Masterwork Whipwood Orc Horn Bow 930gp

Ok, enchant +1, to the above 2930gp

Now, does a +1 Masterwork Whipwood Orc Horn Bow with Adaptive(+1000gp) and Impervious(+3000gp) cost 6930gp, or do I need to pay +3 enchantment pricing because of two special abilities that only cost gold?


Flat cost special abilities do not add to a weapon's effective enhancement bonus.

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