rp troubles


Advice

Grand Lodge

ok so im having a problem with a player we are playing a heavy rp campaign but he dosent seam to want to rp he will activity avoid it when i try any thing to get him involved he says "my character turns around and walks away" or if he has to be their he says " my character dosent care but he will stick with the party" its driving me nuts and all he wants to do is craft because he thinks it will make things cheaper then buying the items he wants


It sounds like the player is probably used to MMO RPGs.

I guess the first thing I'd ask is did you discuss with the player what kind of game you were going to be running? Because it sounds like expectations are not in line.

If you have a player not interested in doing intense RP, but the rest of the table wants it, you're going to end up with at best a bored player, and at worst a disruptive one.

I'd talk to him, and explain where you want the campaign to go, and if he isn't interested, then the best answer may be fore him to step away from the game.


Talk to the player. It's entirely possible he's not the right fit for the group.

Grand Lodge

AaronUnicorn wrote:

It sounds like the player is probably used to MMO RPGs.

I guess the first thing I'd ask is did you discuss with the player what kind of game you were going to be running? Because it sounds like expectations are not in line.

If you have a player not interested in doing intense RP, but the rest of the table wants it, you're going to end up with at best a bored player, and at worst a disruptive one.

I'd talk to him, and explain where you want the campaign to go, and if he isn't interested, then the best answer may be fore him to step away from the game.

so we did discuss what we all wanted to do and he said that sounds fun and wanted to do it but now he just sits their acting like tell me when the next combat is


if they are new to rpgs that's to be expected some can take years to open up to the role playing aspect of the game only thing you can do is try and prompt them for things and get general reactions at 1st then as they get more accustomed to the game then you can prompt for more specifics


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber

Ask the player what's up.

It could be that he's... shy. It takes a lot of self-confidence to open up and basically play-act. Roleplaying feels kind of barby-doll-esque at first.

Or it could be that he's uncomfortable with consequences to his roleplay. Say the wrong thing, and the game world reacts, and poof - the party is in jail. Some people deliberately pick quiet or stupid (or both) characters so they have a reason to not screw things up.

Also, it's possible he's seen how everyone else is doing it, and doesn't feel like there's room for yet another voice.

Finally, it's not impossible that he (metaphorically) tried the soup of the day, decided it tastes like ass, and wants no more, but please tell the chef it was wonderful.


From what the OP has said, I'm not entirely certain that his Player isn't roleplaying.

Grimgrew wrote:
my character dosent care... all he wants to do is craft

So, maybe the player is roleplaying Wilbur Wright, Nikola Tesla, Jamie Hyneman, or somesuchbody. Maybe he is just roleplaying a character who doesn't care about interacting with other characters and just wants to get back to his shop and craft the next thing.

AaronUnicorn wrote:
I guess the first thing I'd ask is did you discuss with the player what kind of game you were going to be running?

That's a good idea, but I think even more important is to discuss with the player what motivates his character. What does his character want to be doing? Why is this character going on adventures? What does this character consider important or sacred?

One time I caused sort of the opposite problem for my DM than your player is giving you. I remember being in a campaign where I was playing a Sacred Fist of Boccob, a Neutrally-Aligned God of Magic and Knowledge. The DM had us on the case of a world-dominating evil goddess of evil magic evil beginning to impose more of her presence on the world, and I found my character not exactly motivated to put a stop to it. It seemed to me that a world-shaking magical phenomenon was something that my character and his god was more interested in studying than stopping. I found myself interviewing vampires and evil overlords that the GM set up to fight us, and she found this extremely frustrating. The rest of the party was kind of with me on this. It wasn't that we weren't roleplaying: we were. It wasn't that we weren't into our characters and her campaign world: we were. The problem was that there was a disconnect between the DM's expectations and the goals and motivations we realized our characters had.

I advise you reach out to your player and try to figure out between you both how to connect your adventure to his character's motivations. You might find the the key to turn the lock that opens the door to his enthusiastic participation. You might find he just doesn't like your style of GMing. In that case, he might be happier leaving the group, or he might have some constructive criticism. It might be that he is just not connecting with his own character and needs your help reinventing it. Maybe his character needs to die or retire to become some village's new blacksmith, and let him make a new character.

Grimgrew wrote:
all he wants to do is craft because he thinks it will make things cheaper then buying the items he wants

This is giving me an idea that he has designed his character build around a specific magic item, and he is frustrated that his character can't acquire it. That might be an easy fix. What does he want to craft?


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I know I'm late to the conversation, but I've seen players that love to play RPGs, but never roleplay. They like the different aspects of it. They like to build the character and use the mechanics they put together to accomplish tasks. As long as he's having fun and not disrupting the game, I say no harm/ no foul. People get different things out of RPGs and everyone has different styles. If he just likes to swing a sword when there's something that needs to be killed or make craft rolls while everyone else is collecting rumors, I say let him. His character just isn't into the social scene and doesn't like talking to people. He lets his friends handle that, but he has their back when they're in a pinch.


Grimgrew wrote:
ok so im having a problem with a player we are playing a heavy rp campaign but he dosent seam to want to rp he will activity avoid it when i try any thing to get him involved he says "my character turns around and walks away" or if he has to be their he says " my character dosent care but he will stick with the party" its driving me nuts and all he wants to do is craft because he thinks it will make things cheaper then buying the items he wants

You can lead a player to RP, but you can't make him think.

I agree with Chuck Mount. Unless he's actively disrupting the game, let him be. We all do this for different reasons.


Does the player behave like this himself? If so, I’m going to suggest that he has a form of Autism. I have Asperger’s Syndrome, also known as high-functioning Autism, and before I got help, I used to behave EXACTLY like this with people I wasn’t used to, and even to some degree with people I was used to. If this is the case, I strongly suggest using highly personalized miniature pieces to represent each unique individual, and give them all detailed personalities. Go the extra mile and write up a couple pages worth of personality information for each reoccurring character, so you’ll remember exactly how they would behave in certain situations. Make sure to have them show up often, and as a result, reduce the number of characters that interact with the PCs, reusing older ones when possible. This way, they both look and feel like actual people, allowing the Autistic person a better chance to get used to them and interact semi properly with them. This will make a world of difference for the player.

If he doesn’t behave like this himself, then uh, um, sweeps post under virtual rug.


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I wouldn't try to diagnose mental issues of someone you've never met based solely on hearsay over the internet.


Grimgrew wrote:
ok so im having a problem with a player we are playing a heavy rp campaign but he dosent seam to want to rp he will activity avoid it when i try any thing to get him involved he says "my character turns around and walks away" or if he has to be their he says " my character dosent care but he will stick with the party" its driving me nuts and all he wants to do is craft because he thinks it will make things cheaper then buying the items he wants

Maybe he feels like there isn't anything worthwhile from the conversation that he, as a character, finds valuable. There are several reasons that I wouldn't want to talk to people, and perhaps part of the character is that he has a pathological aversion to conversing with people he isn't familiar with.

Of course, it can be a case of "Rollplayer syndrome" (which isn't a bad thing), but a lot of times when a GM reads rumors we collect from a local town, we don't really pay much attention to them since a lot of the time they're a joke anyway. Just because I don't care to listen to the GM rattle on about text in a book for 10-15 minutes doesn't mean I don't want to roleplay, it just means that I find that part of the game (which happens to involve a form of roleplaying) to be boring and honestly just soaks up precious time.

A character that's so focused on creation and adventure may not particularly care about what some random villager has to say unless it pertains to the character (or even in some cases, the player). Maybe a fellow crafter wants to meet with the character to discuss the tools of the trade and share some secrets, and if the character decides to dodge them, then they can lose out on a crafting connection to help them with their task, and perhaps it will develop a reputation that may hamper the party if they continue to travel with such a reclusive individual if said crafter decides to spread bad gossip about the party for being denied an audience with the character.

There are plenty of ways that you can incentivize a player (and his character) to engage in roleplay, and finding out what it is that the player wants for his character can help you in providing that incentive for him to participate as long as it is related to his desire to play.


Bloodrealm wrote:
I wouldn't try to diagnose mental issues of someone you've never met based solely on hearsay over the internet.

And yet that is literally what most of the posts here are doing. Trying to diagnose the problem of someone they’ve never met based soley on hearsay over the internet. So I fail to see why you specifically targeted me over doing this, but whatever. Discrimination is going to happen. I’m used to it by now.


Not all people roleplay the same.

Some people enjoy interacting with the foppish Lord Faelbright and his court of follies, mmmm? Some people want to play the man who is as good as his threats. Some people make poetry to present to the faerie queen. Some people make dark plans to infect the world with their will.

Maybe you have an incompatible roleplay style? Or maybe he's a roleplay spectator? It's hard to tell without flatly asking him what he likes out of a roleplay situation (and without knowing what goes on in your roleplay situations).


This could also be one of those "We are gaming at his house and we've been friends for years". A lot of people put in a lot of quality suggestions and yet not having more than the OP and "he just wants Combat is not enough.

Grand Lodge

Some people are just never comfortable with heavy RP.

I've been playing RPGs for 38 years, and I am still far more of a roll player than a role player. People who get super into their characters make me feel very uncomfortable to be around...so I generally try not to get involved with RP heavy games/groups.


Torag is dead. All crafting cost full price (double material, longer time...) All crafting check will be another +10 to DC, materials will become wasted easily so there will be higher demand, less material will be available. Blacksmiths and Clerics inform party that Torag is gone and needs reviving. Unless someone find a way to revive Torag, it will forever stay this way. He will have no choice go with party.

Twist, as party quest to revive Torag, everyone wants to be the hero to revive Torag. Get into fight with many along the way. Finally, got to Torag's Altar. Can't revive Torag. Investigate, Torag was eaten by a monster beyond God, known as the Many that are One. Look just like a person/ tiefling/ angel. With many wings and halo, tail or a chromatic dragon. It gains power from those that fallen around it, and became one with it. The angel and demons all joined force to aid their Gods fighting this thing. All it does is to end Gods. Nothing could stand in its way.

Twist, twist. Team meet Many that are One. It is kind, it informs party that Gods are not worthy of their power, and Torag can't be revive. There are only two ways to bring back Torag, to end the Many that are One. Or become an inheritor of Torag by become worthy in the eyes of Many that are One.

Choice 1- If party fights Many that are One, it will ask the party to at least allow him to complete his quest. To end all gods. In return, it will see if they are worthy. If the party attack, Many that are One will end the party. As they are dead, they will become one with the Many that are One, and see all within it. The pain, the suffering. The party will reborn within the Many that are One. It will ask, will you aid me? Yes, party go on epic god slaying adventure with new powers. No, return to the world, unwanted by it. Trying to survive as the world falls apart as the greed of men ruined the world. Killing each others over materials and items.

Choice 2- Become worthy inheritor. The party enters the Many that are One and found Torag and other Gods. Many that are One ask the party to choose the God they wish to become an inheritor of. After that, party will go through challenges of each God to prove they are worthy. It will be more than a test of skills and powers, but also a test of characters and souls. If a character failed, he stays within the Many that are One for eternity(Lie). The other that passed may choose to leave that member and keep their power(No power will be given. Many that are One value friendships and teamwork. Team be All for one, one for all, it they are to be worthy), or to give up their power to save that friend. If they abandon friends, remain party will reject into the world and have to survive with what's to come. If party attempted to save friends, everyone gain powers and become inheritor of their gods.

After adventure, Many that are One continues its to end all Gods. Eventually, either the party became worthy as inheritor of Gods and fixed all problem in the world. Or others will become worthy and fix all problems. The party will either survive long enough to see it through, or die trying.

Tips, ask players ''How do you feel?'' After each event. Follow by '' What would you like to say to the team?'' Likely respond for first event, ''This is bulls***'', follow by ''We have to f**king do this, now!''. Following events will have vary responds depends of the GM's performance. However, it should encourage one's desire to roleplay when done right.


SiuoL wrote:

Torag is dead. All crafting cost full price (double material, longer time...) All crafting check will be another +10 to DC, materials will become wasted easily so there will be higher demand, less material will be available. Blacksmiths and Clerics inform party that Torag is gone and needs reviving. Unless someone find a way to revive Torag, it will forever stay this way. He will have no choice go with party.

Twist, as party quest to revive Torag, everyone wants to be the hero to revive Torag. Get into fight with many along the way. Finally, got to Torag's Altar. Can't revive Torag. Investigate, Torag was eaten by a monster beyond God, known as the Many that are One. Look just like a person/ tiefling/ angel. With many wings and halo, tail or a chromatic dragon. It gains power from those that fallen around it, and became one with it. The angel and demons all joined force to aid their Gods fighting this thing. All it does is to end Gods. Nothing could stand in its way.

Twist, twist. Team meet Many that are One. It is kind, it informs party that Gods are not worthy of their power, and Torag can't be revive. There are only two ways to bring back Torag, to end the Many that are One. Or become an inheritor of Torag by become worthy in the eyes of Many that are One.

Choice 1- If party fights Many that are One, it will ask the party to at least allow him to complete his quest. To end all gods. In return, it will see if they are worthy. If the party attack, Many that are One will end the party. As they are dead, they will become one with the Many that are One, and see all within it. The pain, the suffering. The party will reborn within the Many that are One. It will ask, will you aid me? Yes, party go on epic god slaying adventure with new powers. No, return to the world, unwanted by it. Trying to survive as the world falls apart as the greed of men ruined the world. Killing each others over materials and items.

Choice 2- Become worthy inheritor. The party enters the Many that are One and found Torag and...

this wont help in the slightest, you cant force people to roll play all this will do is drive a wedge between the two of them as the player will now not be able to do the things that he wants to do and only be surrounded by stuff they don't want to or feel uncomfortable doing and will likely just have them leave


My players came from video games also, and RP was new to them, more or less. I'd start slow with him: Let a random town NPC approach him with a simple question and be gone afterwards. Let some NPC lady make him a compliment after a well-done quest. Let monsters surrender explicitely to him. You probably see the pattern: Keep it short and positive.

It's also about the other players. If they engage in vicious, lengthy or weird RP, that can be a complete turn-off. Talk with them and ask them to also stick with 'short and positive' for now, when it comes to him.

In my campaign, RP is voluntary but encouraged - and the players like it most of the time.


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Adventure Path Charter Subscriber
Reksew_Trebla wrote:


And yet that is literally what most of the posts here are doing. Trying to diagnose the problem of someone they’ve never met based soley on hearsay over the internet.

Oh, people may be offering their take on the problem - but none of them are taking the step of suggesting it may be from a developmental disorder. That's just you and that is a qualitative step farther than anybody else is taking it in this discussion. Suggesting the player may be shy, inexperienced, or have a different role-playing style isn't quite the same as suggesting they might be on the autism spectrum.


Please, everyone, calm down. It is not easy to read and interpret the intention of written words. Mistakes are common. Especially for people in the Autistic Spectrum (like myself). But also for other people.
I also do not think it is wrong to say, it may be autism. It maybe is, maybe not. The possibility is there.
Please don't derail this thread any more.

Paizo Employee Customer Service Manager

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Removed a derail. Avoid back and forth bickering with other forum posters.

In general, a good way to bring up advice based on personal experience is to lead off with "In my experience withX, Y has helped," or "This is similar to what I have experience with due to A, B really helped me." Approaching the conversation this way can help make it sound less like an internet diagnosis and more like suggestions for solutions.


Lady-J wrote:
SiuoL wrote:

Torag is dead. All crafting cost full price (double material, longer time...) All crafting check will be another +10 to DC, materials will become wasted easily so there will be higher demand, less material will be available. Blacksmiths and Clerics inform party that Torag is gone and needs reviving. Unless someone find a way to revive Torag, it will forever stay this way. He will have no choice go with party.

Twist, as party quest to revive Torag, everyone wants to be the hero to revive Torag. Get into fight with many along the way. Finally, got to Torag's Altar. Can't revive Torag. Investigate, Torag was eaten by a monster beyond God, known as the Many that are One. Look just like a person/ tiefling/ angel. With many wings and halo, tail or a chromatic dragon. It gains power from those that fallen around it, and became one with it. The angel and demons all joined force to aid their Gods fighting this thing. All it does is to end Gods. Nothing could stand in its way.

Twist, twist. Team meet Many that are One. It is kind, it informs party that Gods are not worthy of their power, and Torag can't be revive. There are only two ways to bring back Torag, to end the Many that are One. Or become an inheritor of Torag by become worthy in the eyes of Many that are One.

Choice 1- If party fights Many that are One, it will ask the party to at least allow him to complete his quest. To end all gods. In return, it will see if they are worthy. If the party attack, Many that are One will end the party. As they are dead, they will become one with the Many that are One, and see all within it. The pain, the suffering. The party will reborn within the Many that are One. It will ask, will you aid me? Yes, party go on epic god slaying adventure with new powers. No, return to the world, unwanted by it. Trying to survive as the world falls apart as the greed of men ruined the world. Killing each others over materials and items.

Choice 2- Become worthy inheritor. The party enters the Many that are

...

It is not forced. It is encouraging. The player will be perfectly find if the player still refused to roleplay. Sometime, a test of character is based on one's action, not acting skills... Good GM should know when to take away what's most important to the player and character as one, then give it back to them so it feels special. You want to keep your players on hook and beg to you play more. You want your players to keep investing into the story because in your world, they feel special, not just as someone that do a thing very well, but you make them feel special by allowing them to see that their passion means something. Everyone is passionate in something, even being lazy takes commitment. As a GM, I can make any player and any character feel special and see how special each others are, then work together as one despite their differences, because that's one of my job. To maximise their fun, and there are no fun greater than knowing your actions and team efforts can change the world, not only in game, but all multiverse. That's why no one can be the Many that are One.


SiuoL wrote:
It is not forced. It is encouraging. The player will be perfectly find if the player still refused to roleplay. Sometime, a test of character is based on one's action, not acting skills... Good GM should know when to take away what's most important to the player and character as one, then give it back to them so it feels special. You want to keep your players on hook and beg to you play more. You want your players to keep investing into the story because in your world, they feel special, not just as someone that do a thing very well, but you make them feel special by allowing them to see that their passion means something. Everyone is passionate in something, even being lazy takes commitment. As a GM, I can make any player and any character feel special and see how special each others are, then work together as one despite their differences, because that's one of my job. To maximise their fun, and there are no fun greater than knowing your actions and team efforts can change the world, not only in game, but all multiverse. That's why no one can be the Many that are One.

if you are removing what they love doing in the campaign ie making crafting complete garbage just cuz you hand waved that the crafting god is dead or some bullchit reason like that and rail road them into a position were if they want to get back the thing they like then they got to do things your way then yes its forcing them into a position of stay in a campaign they probably wont enjoy anymore or leave the game


Lady-J wrote:
SiuoL wrote:
It is not forced. It is encouraging. The player will be perfectly find if the player still refused to roleplay. Sometime, a test of character is based on one's action, not acting skills... Good GM should know when to take away what's most important to the player and character as one, then give it back to them so it feels special. You want to keep your players on hook and beg to you play more. You want your players to keep investing into the story because in your world, they feel special, not just as someone that do a thing very well, but you make them feel special by allowing them to see that their passion means something. Everyone is passionate in something, even being lazy takes commitment. As a GM, I can make any player and any character feel special and see how special each others are, then work together as one despite their differences, because that's one of my job. To maximise their fun, and there are no fun greater than knowing your actions and team efforts can change the world, not only in game, but all multiverse. That's why no one can be the Many that are One.
if you are removing what they love doing in the campaign ie making crafting complete garbage just cuz you hand waved that the crafting god is dead or some bullchit reason like that and rail road them into a position were if they want to get back the thing they like then they got to do things your way then yes its forcing them into a position of stay in a campaign they probably wont enjoy anymore or leave the game

Modern human, only care for instant gratification. You love something, you work hard to get it. If I play a fighter, I work hard to fight against the impossible against magic. If I play a rogue, I out smart my opponent no matter what. If I play a caster, I won't get my limited spell slot stop me. If you truly love something, work for it. That's why so many people get paid more while doing nothing. That's why people like me work day and night, seven days, doing 10 times more work and still don't get as much pay, because people whining about what they should have without working for it. I work for everything I earn with more work than anyone. I smashed a character with 10 times more magical items than myself while way more optimised than me. Because I work hard. I play a fighter, I learn all tactics in human history and invent my own. I play caster, I use magic at perfect timing and control the flow of all thing. I play craftman, I respect what is happening to the world and make the most out of it. Plan, calculate, explore. If crafting magical item doesn't work, what about engineering? I don't stop, never stop. If I can't do it, I will join force with others. Because if you care for something, you do whatever it takes. If you can't even be bother to do that, don't play. Game is not design to please you all the way. That's not game, that is loots feeding. Must mommy feed you everything you want so you are happy all the time? No, I was born with no help. I suffer abuse everything in my childhood while I study to change my life. When I get beaten up for doing well as school, I learn to fight. When I get bashed with a back of a cleaver, I learn to eat more and tank it. Then when I'm out of this nightmare, I made sure no one touches my children. I don't get fed with happiness like you modern human. I'm draconic, I'm worthy. I do what I need to get what I want. Why should you or anyone else be different?


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Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
SiuoL wrote:
If you can't even be bother to do that, don't play. Game is not design to please you all the way. That's not game, that is loots feeding. Must mommy feed you everything you want so you are happy all the time?

Not everyone plays the game for your reasons, nor with your world view. It is perfectly valid to have another playstyle, other motivations, and other reasons to spend an evening with your friends.

Disdainful slurs about other people's approach to life and gaming are not appropriate on these boards.


CrystalSeas wrote:
SiuoL wrote:
If you can't even be bother to do that, don't play. Game is not design to please you all the way. That's not game, that is loots feeding. Must mommy feed you everything you want so you are happy all the time?

Not everyone plays the game for your reasons, nor with your world view. It is perfectly valid to have another playstyle, other motivations, and other reasons to spend an evening with your friends.

Disdainful slurs about other people's approach to life and gaming are not appropriate on these boards.

I am sorry, you are perfectly right. However, I don't see my way of gaming is wrong as I did similar campaign for people who have problem with suicide and it gives them the realisation that their live is not bad, I help to learn to understand each others through roleplaying and gave the motivation to live. Because they know that to gain something truly great, you must face hardship. And I never have them back for my help. Return to society and working towards what they aiming towards and understand good things takes time.

Of course I don't expect you to understand how much change this would put on the players, and I assume all GM will talk to their players first to see if it's cool for them to take this mechanic away for something greater. I shouldn't all GM do that as to me, this is the basic. And of course I don't expect you to even care about how that campaign I suggest would be great to, make people have feelings, to roleplay, to care for each others and themselves. After all, I just assume all players are friends. I just assume GM and the game will bond them together. But with my experience, I help a person to get out of his comfort zone and roleplay, and be who what he cannot be and feel it for the first time. He realized he could change, to be better. And that, I would like to share with others here. Maybe something similar like what I suggested, would bring feelings and good changes to not only you game, but you and your players.

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