Rule you never see used though it is RAW


Pathfinder First Edition General Discussion

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We used the rules under the Fly skill for turning 45 degrees, 90 etc. Once.


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bodhranist wrote:
Has anyone ever actually used the settlement modifiers (Corruption, Crime, Economy, Law, Lore, Society) as modifiers for the various skills? (Okay, I'm in Underbridge in Magnimar, so suddenly all thieves are +6 to pickpocket me, although I'm +6 better at detecting lies and +4 better at hiding in an alley and +1 better at making money, but if I walk 5 minutes to Dockway I've suddenly got +7 to making money, and +6 to gathering information, but -2 to intimidating someone into acting friendly....)

I love settlement modifiers - they actually do a lot to help the 'feel' of a given place. But since most my adventures are taking place in towns vs cities or hamlets, they are of little mechanical effect.


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Elevation bonus while mounted. Everybody who's not a professional rider forgets to add it. Everybody who's a cavalier or a paladin forgets to remove it from their HeroLab print-out while afoot. They also forget to remove it when fighting a monster that is not smaller than their mount.


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RealAlchemy wrote:
Tarondor wrote:

Ineffective Weapons: Certain weapons just can’t effectively deal damage to certain objects. For example, a bludgeoning weapon cannot be used to damage a rope. Likewise, most melee weapons have little effect on stone walls and doors, unless they are designed for breaking up stone, such as a pick or hammer.

- p. 174 of the Core Rulebook

I usually see people who want to use magic swords to hack through stone walls.

And that's why my dwarven ranger's adamantine weapon is a heavy pick.

That Adamantine doesn't disintegrate rock

In real life, the effective volume of excavated earth at least doubles its pre-excavated volume - for loose rock it's often much more than twice the volume. The dwarven ranger would just bury themselves in rubble trying to hack through a wall.


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Hugo Rune wrote:
In real life, the effective volume of excavated earth at least doubles its pre-excavated volume - for loose rock it's often much more than twice the volume. The dwarven ranger would just bury themselves in rubble trying to hack through a wall.

Well that's not true at all. He'd only have that issue if he was tunneling into the side of a cave continuously. Most walls aren't so thick that rubble is a huge issue. After all swat teams aren't covered in rubble when they take down a wall with C4. There is a ton of particulate, it's messy, and there is debris everywhere, but no one's buried going through an indoor wall or even most exterior walls.

Though a lot of this comes from my players using creatively placed explosive runes to literally C4 SWAT ambush someone.

As for rules I don't use. I have never included the wondrous items that just cast a specific spell 1-3 times per day. They are a waste of page space and a waste of a loot space.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Tinalles wrote:

Here's one:

PRD, the Magic chapter in the Core rulebook wrote:
If one abjuration spell is active within 10 feet of another for 24 hours or more, the magical fields interfere with each other and create barely visible energy fluctuations. The DC to find such spells with the Perception skill drops by 4.
I've known about this for years and never seen it come up. Something to keep in mind if you have a permanent Arcane Lock and a permanent Alarm spell on the same door, I guess.

oooo!!!

*takes notes*


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Alex Smith 908 wrote:
Hugo Rune wrote:
In real life, the effective volume of excavated earth at least doubles its pre-excavated volume - for loose rock it's often much more than twice the volume. The dwarven ranger would just bury themselves in rubble trying to hack through a wall.

Well that's not true at all. He'd only have that issue if he was tunneling into the side of a cave continuously. Most walls aren't so thick that rubble is a huge issue. After all swat teams aren't covered in rubble when they take down a wall with C4. There is a ton of particulate, it's messy, and there is debris everywhere, but no one's buried going through an indoor wall or even most exterior walls.

read this as a swat team taking out a CR4 wall XD was like what kind of walls are you throwing at your players


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Alex Smith 908 wrote:
Hugo Rune wrote:
In real life, the effective volume of excavated earth at least doubles its pre-excavated volume - for loose rock it's often much more than twice the volume. The dwarven ranger would just bury themselves in rubble trying to hack through a wall.

Well that's not true at all. He'd only have that issue if he was tunneling into the side of a cave continuously. Most walls aren't so thick that rubble is a huge issue. After all swat teams aren't covered in rubble when they take down a wall with C4. There is a ton of particulate, it's messy, and there is debris everywhere, but no one's buried going through an indoor wall or even most exterior walls.

Several things

1. The explosive force of C4 is significantly greater than the explosive force of a pickaxe and so can distribute the rubble further and SWAT teams stand a safe distance back before detonating, an option unavailable to the wielder of the pickaxe.

2. Modern buildings don't often have 3 foot thick hewn stone walls, or even 1 foot thick masonry walls (both thicknesses from the PRD). The minimum in game volume a medium character could crawl through is 2.5x2.5 (squeeze height and width). That is 6.25 cubic feet of rock per foot of wall thickness (pre-excavation volume), that weighs 150-175lbs per cubic foot. It all has to be cleared (now 13.5 - 27 cubic feet of volume) and put somewhere out the way before the gap can be squeezed through.

3. A pickaxe wielded by a STR20 character could do 44 points of damage on a crit. Given a 10 foot by 10 foot by 1 foot section of masonry has 90HP. The dwarf has broken just shy of 50 cubic feet of masonry with one blow (possibly about the same as a wrecking ball?). That's nearly 3.5 tons of falling rock he is stood directly in front of that will now occupy 100 to 200 cubic feet of space.


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Hugo Rune wrote:
Alex Smith 908 wrote:
Hugo Rune wrote:
In real life, the effective volume of excavated earth at least doubles its pre-excavated volume - for loose rock it's often much more than twice the volume. The dwarven ranger would just bury themselves in rubble trying to hack through a wall.

Well that's not true at all. He'd only have that issue if he was tunneling into the side of a cave continuously. Most walls aren't so thick that rubble is a huge issue. After all swat teams aren't covered in rubble when they take down a wall with C4. There is a ton of particulate, it's messy, and there is debris everywhere, but no one's buried going through an indoor wall or even most exterior walls.

Several things

1. The explosive force of C4 is significantly greater than the explosive force of a pickaxe and so can distribute the rubble further and SWAT teams stand a safe distance back before detonating, an option unavailable to the wielder of the pickaxe.

2. Modern buildings don't often have 3 foot thick hewn stone walls, or even 1 foot thick masonry walls (both thicknesses from the PRD). The minimum in game volume a medium character could crawl through is 2.5x2.5 (squeeze height and width). That is 6.25 cubic feet of rock per foot of wall thickness (pre-excavation volume), that weighs 150-175lbs per cubic foot. It all has to be cleared (now 13.5 - 27 cubic feet of volume) and put somewhere out the way before the gap can be squeezed through.

3. A pickaxe wielded by a STR20 character could do 44 points of damage on a crit. Given a 10 foot by 10 foot by 1 foot section of masonry has 90HP. The dwarf has broken just shy of 50 cubic feet of masonry with one blow (possibly about the same as a wrecking ball?). That's nearly 3.5 tons of falling rock he is stood directly in front of that will now occupy 100 to 200 cubic feet of space.

Yes but that's not rules of the game, that's real life physics. You also don't determine structural damage on nearby buildings when you drop a colossal dragon nearby. Or even wonder how can he fly at all.


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Lady-J wrote:
not every comment i make are making use out of the rules we use in our campaigns

Right, just the ones with numbers.

SO unless you do a full layout when you lay down a crazy claim to show at what level and what is needed to reach your number it's easier to answer "HOW?" by saying your games are super high powered.


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Pathfinder Companion Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

one rule I use at my tables (which I think is actually RAW) is that dead bodies on the battlefield create difficult terrain (I generally do this for anything that is larger than the PCs - though technically I believe any dead body sized medium or larger by RAW does create difficult terrain)

(of course this is only monsters that leave bodies behind - so no summoned or incorporeal etc)

In play this is generally fairly easy to adjudicate - either leaving miniatures on the playmat or using a flat token to indicate the squares that have bodies - it does slow down combat slightly and creates some tactical options - and it gives some further incentives for flight or abilities to bypass difficult terrain - and it doesn't strain credibility - a dead dragon or ogre should leave a big obstacle that has to be gotten around (or which can be used for cover)


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Rysky wrote:
Tinalles wrote:

Here's one:

PRD, the Magic chapter in the Core rulebook wrote:
If one abjuration spell is active within 10 feet of another for 24 hours or more, the magical fields interfere with each other and create barely visible energy fluctuations. The DC to find such spells with the Perception skill drops by 4.
I've known about this for years and never seen it come up. Something to keep in mind if you have a permanent Arcane Lock and a permanent Alarm spell on the same door, I guess.

oooo!!!

*takes notes*

My problem with this rule is I cant find the original perception DC that is dropped by 4... Alarm doesn't have a perception DC (that I'm aware of).


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Lady-J wrote:
Alex Smith 908 wrote:
Hugo Rune wrote:
In real life, the effective volume of excavated earth at least doubles its pre-excavated volume - for loose rock it's often much more than twice the volume. The dwarven ranger would just bury themselves in rubble trying to hack through a wall.

Well that's not true at all. He'd only have that issue if he was tunneling into the side of a cave continuously. Most walls aren't so thick that rubble is a huge issue. After all swat teams aren't covered in rubble when they take down a wall with C4. There is a ton of particulate, it's messy, and there is debris everywhere, but no one's buried going through an indoor wall or even most exterior walls.

read this as a swat team taking out a CR4 wall XD was like what kind of walls are you throwing at your players

I would also be very interested in seeing the stat block for this CR4 wall...

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DM Livgin wrote:
My problem with this rule is I cant find the original perception DC that is dropped by 4... Alarm doesn't have a perception DC (that I'm aware of).

I'm fairly sure alarm counts as a magic trap, and thus has a Perception DC of 26 (25+spell level).


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Java Man wrote:
I would also be very interested in seeing the stat block for this CR4 wall...

CR4 wall


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Slim Jim wrote:
Elevation bonus while mounted. Everybody who's not a professional rider forgets to add it. Everybody who's a cavalier or a paladin forgets to remove it from their HeroLab print-out while afoot. They also forget to remove it when fighting a monster that is not smaller than their mount.

A question about this rule - does this mean a critter that is larger in size than what it is attacking should get a to hit bonus (For example, a large Dire Tiger attacking a medium Human would get said +1 elevation bonus. How about a Huge Elephant)?


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WhiteMagus2000 wrote:

That coins are actually pretty damn heavy. 50 coins per pound, so 2000gp to enchant your sword weighs 40 lbs! IRL 40lbs of gold = $816,640. I did have one GM that would occasionally audit weights on all that characters, chart days of food remaining, and make us find water every day or two.

By the way, IRL its 291.667 penny weights (one copper) per pound, so pathfinder coins are HUGE, like 1/3 of an once.

My group does away with weight altogether except for exceptionally heavy items, like chests made of adamantine. Instead we go for how much you'd realistically be able to carry. RAW, you might be able to carry 20 barrels, but there's no realistic way to carry that many of something so bulky.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
graystone wrote:
SorrySleeping wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
Meraki wrote:
Carrying capacity/encumbrance. No group I've played with has bothered tracking it. As long as no one tries to do something ridiculous like the party wizard carrying around a piano or loot an entire armory of 300 greatswords, we don't feel the need to pay attention to it.
if built for it carrying 300 greatswords for some people would still be a light load
Greatsword is 8lbs. 300 Greatswords is 2400lbs. A 30 Str only gives you up to 1600lbs as a heavy load, 532 is the maximum light load. Even with Ant Haul, that is 1596lbs. Capable of carrying the Greatswords, but not as a light load.

Now make that 30 on a large/huge quad [wildshape] with a mastercraft backpack and muleback cords. Then add Efficient Packer & Muscle of the Society traits, Burdenless armor, Powerful Shape and Cut Your Losses feats along with a level of Kineticist for Basic Chaokinesis. Then make a DC 15 profession Porter +2 more.

If you focus on stacking carrying ability, it can quickly get where you can move insane weights.

Okay, sure, but it would get mighty unwieldy to actually carry all that around.

It was a random number that I picked off the top of my head. The point being, we just estimate carrying capacity rather than using strict numbers and trust people not to abuse it.


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ryric wrote:
DM Livgin wrote:
My problem with this rule is I cant find the original perception DC that is dropped by 4... Alarm doesn't have a perception DC (that I'm aware of).
I'm fairly sure alarm counts as a magic trap, and thus has a Perception DC of 26 (25+spell level).

That is a huge help! For many games I've played, alarm was an automatic 'gotcha' unless you were detecting magic.


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Hugo Rune wrote:


Several things
1. The explosive force of C4 is significantly greater than the explosive force of a pickaxe and so can distribute the rubble further and SWAT teams stand a safe distance back before detonating, an option unavailable to the wielder of the pickaxe.

Well lets see Cylex (scroll down) deals 6d6 bludgeoning and 6d6 Fire it averages (6*3.5)+(6*3.5/2)=31.5 damage to the wall on average. A pick axe does 1d8+str*1.5 per swing so using your 20 str character thats 11.5 which based on your critical is greater force though you are correct he is closer to the wall.

But even at first level he probably has power attack moving him up to 14.5 per swing if he is a fighter then by 5th level (most reasonable level to first have an adamantine weapon) he is up to 20.5 without a crit, or looking at more than 2 of his feats.

Hugo Rune wrote:
2. Modern buildings don't often have 3 foot thick hewn stone walls, or even 1 foot thick masonry walls (both thicknesses from the PRD). The minimum in game volume a medium character could crawl through is 2.5x2.5 (squeeze height and width). That is 6.25 cubic feet of rock per foot of wall thickness (pre-excavation volume), that weighs 150-175lbs per cubic foot. It all has to be cleared (now 13.5 - 27 cubic feet of volume) and put somewhere out the way before the gap can be squeezed through.

Well as to clearing the gap if C4 does it at less damage than a pick crit than a crit from the pick or a highly speced character should be around the same.

Hugo Rune wrote:

3. A pickaxe wielded by a STR20 character could do 44 points of damage on a crit. Given a 10 foot by 10 foot by 1 foot section of masonry has 90HP. The dwarf has broken just shy of 50 cubic feet of masonry with one blow (possibly about the same as a wrecking ball?). That's nearly 3.5 tons of falling rock he is stood directly in front of that will now occupy 100 to 200 cubic feet of space.

And just like a wrecking ball its unlikely all the debris is going straight down.


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And since i got locked out before I could Edit. The Cylex damage would still be reduced by hardness where an adamantine pickaxe wouldn't


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Meraki wrote:
Okay, sure, but it would get mighty unwieldy to actually carry all that around.

Well that's a different issue that's not dealt with well in pathfinder. For that though, a makeshift sled does the trick and even allows x5 the max weight carried.

Chess Pwn wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
not every comment i make are making use out of the rules we use in our campaigns

Right, just the ones with numbers.

SO unless you do a full layout when you lay down a crazy claim to show at what level and what is needed to reach your number it's easier to answer "HOW?" by saying your games are super high powered.

To be fair to Lady-J, nothing special is needed to get HUGE numbers for carry so in THIS instance, it really has nothing to do with her way of playing the game. You can get big, big numbers in a 15 point buy game too.

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Yeah, my druid just focused on having a high Str score, so he has a light load of 2700 in Huge squid form. He just picks up our pirate ship when it gets stuck on a sandbar.


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Hugo Rune wrote:
RealAlchemy wrote:
Tarondor wrote:

Ineffective Weapons: Certain weapons just can’t effectively deal damage to certain objects. For example, a bludgeoning weapon cannot be used to damage a rope. Likewise, most melee weapons have little effect on stone walls and doors, unless they are designed for breaking up stone, such as a pick or hammer.

- p. 174 of the Core Rulebook

I usually see people who want to use magic swords to hack through stone walls.

And that's why my dwarven ranger's adamantine weapon is a heavy pick.

That Adamantine doesn't disintegrate rock

In real life, the effective volume of excavated earth at least doubles its pre-excavated volume - for loose rock it's often much more than twice the volume. The dwarven ranger would just bury themselves in rubble trying to hack through a wall.

I trained profession miner : he can do it properly :)


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Pathfinder Companion, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Rycaut wrote:

one rule I use at my tables (which I think is actually RAW) is that dead bodies on the battlefield create difficult terrain (I generally do this for anything that is larger than the PCs - though technically I believe any dead body sized medium or larger by RAW does create difficult terrain)

(of course this is only monsters that leave bodies behind - so no summoned or incorporeal etc)

In play this is generally fairly easy to adjudicate - either leaving miniatures on the playmat or using a flat token to indicate the squares that have bodies - it does slow down combat slightly and creates some tactical options - and it gives some further incentives for flight or abilities to bypass difficult terrain - and it doesn't strain credibility - a dead dragon or ogre should leave a big obstacle that has to be gotten around (or which can be used for cover)

We use them except in cases where it likely won't matter, e.g., when the body is outside of the main combat area.


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Pathfinder Companion, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I've found that the more we play, and the better grasp I get of all the rules, the more comfortable everyone is with implementing a lot of these more obscure rules.

One rule subset I doubt we'll ever warm to, however, is equipment damage. There is no sunder in our games. Frankly, about the only combat maneuver we ever attempt is trip, and only because the large wolf AC gets it for free. Every time one of my baddies uses grapple I regret it, and I've never done anything useful with bull rush, either.

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I DMed a group of 8 that contained a goliath monk. The whole table learned the 3.5 grapple rules--it was AMAZING!!!!

Bull Rush's utility is dependent on terrain. It helps if there are pits and ledges and hazards to be pushed into.


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Hugo Rune wrote:
3. A pickaxe wielded by a STR20 character could do 44 points of damage on a crit. Given a 10 foot by 10 foot by 1 foot section of masonry has 90HP. The dwarf has broken just shy of 50 cubic feet of masonry with one blow (possibly about the same as a wrecking ball?). That's nearly 3.5 tons of falling rock he is stood directly in front of that will now occupy 100 to 200 cubic feet of space.

Giant hammers work pretty good too. (1m20s mark)

Silver Crusade

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DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:
Bag of Holding wrote:
If a bag of holding is overloaded, or if sharp objects pierce it (from inside or outside), the bag immediately ruptures and is ruined, and all contents are lost forever.
Hands up how many people have thrown a bunch of swords, daggers, knives into a bag of Holding for later re-sale without consequence?

This is why I always ask if the corpses we're stealing the weapons from have sheathes. Usually, it makes sense that they do. So if you sheathe and peace tie the weapons so they stay in the sheathes, they're fine to put in any bag without worrying about them cutting their way out.


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Fromper wrote:
DM_aka_Dudemeister wrote:
Bag of Holding wrote:
If a bag of holding is overloaded, or if sharp objects pierce it (from inside or outside), the bag immediately ruptures and is ruined, and all contents are lost forever.
Hands up how many people have thrown a bunch of swords, daggers, knives into a bag of Holding for later re-sale without consequence?
This is why I always ask if the corpses we're stealing the weapons from have sheathes. Usually, it makes sense that they do. So if you sheathe and peace tie the weapons so they stay in the sheathes, they're fine to put in any bag without worrying about them cutting their way out.

*shrug* It's not hard to wrap blades with cloth/rags/ect. If you've been chopping down a bunch of creatures that had weapons, they likely had clothes you could cover the blades with...


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Hugo Rune wrote:


2. Modern buildings don't often have 3 foot thick hewn stone walls, or even 1 foot thick masonry walls (both thicknesses from the PRD). The minimum in game volume a medium character could crawl through is 2.5x2.5 (squeeze height and width). That is 6.25 cubic feet of rock per foot of wall thickness (pre-excavation volume), that weighs 150-175lbs per cubic foot. It all has to be cleared (now 13.5 - 27 cubic feet of volume) and put somewhere out the way before the gap can be squeezed through.

So a 15 foot cone of difficult terrain 1 foot thick forms around the excavation site. No biggy. We're not burrowing through a virgin mountain and we don't care how the floor looks after we're done with a dungeon. When the Brits performed tunneling actions in WW1 they blasted the last few feet and we able to walk over just fine.

Hugo Rune wrote:


3. A pickaxe wielded by a STR20 character could do 44 points of damage on a crit. Given a 10 foot by 10 foot by 1 foot section of masonry has 90HP. The dwarf has broken just shy of 50 cubic feet of masonry with one blow (possibly about the same as a wrecking ball?). That's nearly 3.5 tons of falling rock he is stood directly in front of that will now occupy 100 to 200 cubic feet of space.

If we assume that the dwarf has to use 100% of his force why would we assume the rock would be blown backwards? Wouldn't it make more sense for it to end up on the room he is smashing into? Creating an avalanche of rock.


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Alex Smith 908 wrote:
Hugo Rune wrote:


3. A pickaxe wielded by a STR20 character could do 44 points of damage on a crit. Given a 10 foot by 10 foot by 1 foot section of masonry has 90HP. The dwarf has broken just shy of 50 cubic feet of masonry with one blow (possibly about the same as a wrecking ball?). That's nearly 3.5 tons of falling rock he is stood directly in front of that will now occupy 100 to 200 cubic feet of space.
If we assume that the dwarf has to use 100% of his force why would we assume the rock would be blown backwards? Wouldn't it make more sense for it to end up on the room he is smashing into? Creating an avalanche of rock.

My guess? Because the numbers indicate that he hasn't gotten half-way through on the first swing (44/90 HP, hence just under 50 cubic feet out of the 100 cubic feet in that wall section).


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i've seen some players forget that they start out with 10 gold worth of clothes when they make a character XD


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Lady-J wrote:
i've seen some players forget that they start out with 10 gold worth of clothes when they make a character XD

Well, a set of clothes up to 10gp at least. If it was 10 gp worth of clothes, someone could start off with 100 sets of basic Pirate clothes. ;)


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graystone wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
i've seen some players forget that they start out with 10 gold worth of clothes when they make a character XD
Well, a set of clothes up to 10gp at least. If it was 10 gp worth of clothes, someone could start off with 100 sets of basic Pirate clothes. ;)

ya well they only bought armor and weapons so they didn't even have basic clothes


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Lady-J wrote:
graystone wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
i've seen some players forget that they start out with 10 gold worth of clothes when they make a character XD
Well, a set of clothes up to 10gp at least. If it was 10 gp worth of clothes, someone could start off with 100 sets of basic Pirate clothes. ;)
ya well they only bought armor and weapons so they didn't even have basic clothes

Now I kind of WANT to to start up a character that has 100 outfits...

Myself I'm a sucker for picking up all the goodies I think I'll need/want for a new character. ;)


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graystone wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
graystone wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
i've seen some players forget that they start out with 10 gold worth of clothes when they make a character XD
Well, a set of clothes up to 10gp at least. If it was 10 gp worth of clothes, someone could start off with 100 sets of basic Pirate clothes. ;)
ya well they only bought armor and weapons so they didn't even have basic clothes

Now I kind of WANT to to start up a character that has 100 outfits...

Myself I'm a sucker for picking up all the goodies I think I'll need/want for a new character. ;)

just make sure you give them a stupid high carrying capacity so you can carry those outfits


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What you do is get a animated magic chest with little wooden legs trained to follow you around. also make it immune to magic.


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Vidmaster7 wrote:
What you do is get a animated magic chest with little wooden legs trained to follow you around. also make it immune to magic.

make it immune to rogues while your at it aswell

Silver Crusade

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graystone wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
graystone wrote:
Lady-J wrote:
i've seen some players forget that they start out with 10 gold worth of clothes when they make a character XD
Well, a set of clothes up to 10gp at least. If it was 10 gp worth of clothes, someone could start off with 100 sets of basic Pirate clothes. ;)
ya well they only bought armor and weapons so they didn't even have basic clothes

Now I kind of WANT to to start up a character that has 100 outfits...

Myself I'm a sucker for picking up all the goodies I think I'll need/want for a new character. ;)

Sleeves of Many Garments. That's what my fashionista PC picked up as early as possible for that purpose.


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I don't know if it exists in PF but in 1st their was a parapet of proof against thievery.

Alternatively you can give the chest a bite attack. that should dissuade thiefs. or if your real hardcore use extra dimensional space and give it a swallow whole. You'll never see that thief again nor will anyone else!


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Vidmaster7 wrote:

I don't know if it exists in PF but in 1st their was a parapet of proof against thievery.

Alternatively you can give the chest a bite attack. that should dissuade thiefs. or if your real hardcore use extra dimensional space and give it a swallow whole. You'll never see that thief again nor will anyone else!

pet mimic that attacks every one but you?


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Lady-J wrote:
Vidmaster7 wrote:

I don't know if it exists in PF but in 1st their was a parapet of proof against thievery.

Alternatively you can give the chest a bite attack. that should dissuade thiefs. or if your real hardcore use extra dimensional space and give it a swallow whole. You'll never see that thief again nor will anyone else!

pet mimic that attacks every one but you?

And lets you store your stuff in it!

(Its super pratchett)


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I've never seen anyone kneeling.


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Vidmaster7 wrote:
What you do is get a animated magic chest with little wooden legs trained to follow you around. also make it immune to magic.

They make pack yaks for a reason. 24gp for a large 27str quadruped for 1038 lbs. light load, meaning a Yak can carry a ANOTHER yak and still have 38 pounds it can carry without penalties.

And if it happens to die that's 1000 lbs of tasty, tasty yak. ;)

Sleeves of Many Garments: While I do like the item, I'm still disappointed there isn't any guidance of bonuses for visual outfits. For instance, it's up to the DM if my illusionary outfit [like Royal outfit] and/or the underlying outfit [like a Shinobi shozoku] do anything. I'm at enough different 'tables' that it's a bit of a crapshoot how well it actually works.


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Alex Smith 908 wrote:
Hugo Rune wrote:


2. Modern buildings don't often have 3 foot thick hewn stone walls, or even 1 foot thick masonry walls (both thicknesses from the PRD). The minimum in game volume a medium character could crawl through is 2.5x2.5 (squeeze height and width). That is 6.25 cubic feet of rock per foot of wall thickness (pre-excavation volume), that weighs 150-175lbs per cubic foot. It all has to be cleared (now 13.5 - 27 cubic feet of volume) and put somewhere out the way before the gap can be squeezed through.

So a 15 foot cone of difficult terrain 1 foot thick forms around the excavation site. No biggy. We're not burrowing through a virgin mountain and we don't care how the floor looks after we're done with a dungeon. When the Brits performed tunneling actions in WW1 they blasted the last few feet and we able to walk over just fine.

Hugo Rune wrote:


3. A pickaxe wielded by a STR20 character could do 44 points of damage on a crit. Given a 10 foot by 10 foot by 1 foot section of masonry has 90HP. The dwarf has broken just shy of 50 cubic feet of masonry with one blow (possibly about the same as a wrecking ball?). That's nearly 3.5 tons of falling rock he is stood directly in front of that will now occupy 100 to 200 cubic feet of space.
If we assume that the dwarf has to use 100% of his force why would we assume the rock would be blown backwards? Wouldn't it make more sense for it to end up on the room he is smashing into? Creating an avalanche of rock.

It's just a matter of time, energy and effort. Smashing through the wall in one or two rounds and then walking through the new archway, which some people think is possible with an adamantine weapon is absurd. That's because the rubble which is created has to be moved out the way and it has to be done in a fashion that doesn't cause the wielder damage. In your own example, you have a 15 foot cone of rock (about 2500 lbs) that previously occupied the square directly in front of the pickaxe wielder and now occupies the wielder's square and two others behind the wielder. If that happened in one round, then you are probably looking at taking damage roughly equivalent to being trampled by a bison. If the miner took more time then no they wouldn't take damage but they would be moved further away from the face by the expanding pile of rubble which would then need clearing. Rock is heavy so the people (i.e. other party members, who may not be strong) clearing the rock may not be able to carry large pieces, especially whilst wearing armour and carrying weapons. This leads to a scenario where the party are making a lot of noise for many rounds, whilst potentially unarmed and unarmoured and making the terrain around themselves difficult. The root of the problem being people forget that excavating through a wall creates rubble, which isn't disintegrated by adamantine weapons.


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Matthew Downie wrote:
I've never seen anyone kneeling.

We kneeled a lot before it was faqerrataed and was a free action. Now that is a move it's not worth it.


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graystone wrote:
Vidmaster7 wrote:
What you do is get a animated magic chest with little wooden legs trained to follow you around. also make it immune to magic.

They make pack yaks for a reason. 24gp for a large 27str quadruped for 1038 lbs. light load, meaning a Yak can carry a ANOTHER yak and still have 38 pounds it can carry without penalties.

And if it happens to die that's 1000 lbs of tasty, tasty yak. ;)

Sleeves of Many Garments: While I do like the item, I'm still disappointed there isn't any guidance of bonuses for visual outfits. For instance, it's up to the DM if my illusionary outfit [like Royal outfit] and/or the underlying outfit [like a Shinobi shozoku] do anything. I'm at enough different 'tables' that it's a bit of a crapshoot how well it actually works.

But the yak can't eat a thief and save it inside his inter-dimensional space for later!


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by raw rogues can time no one uses those rules tho

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