Do item levels prohibit their purchase at level 1?


Rules Questions

Scarab Sages

Can a starting character purchase a Flame pistol (level 2 Small Arms) if they somehow had the funds to do so?


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Starfinder Core Rulebook page 167 wrote:
Rather than meticulously track every arms dealer, contact, guild, and license a character has access to, the game assumes that in typical settlements you can find and purchase anything with an item level no greater than your character level + 1, and at major settlements items up to your character level + 2. The GM can restrict access to some items (even those of an appropriate level) or make items of a higher level available for purchase (possibly at a greatly increased price or in return for a favor done for the seller).

Scarab Sages

Ventnor wrote:
Starfinder Core Rulebook page 167 wrote:
Rather than meticulously track every arms dealer, contact, guild, and license a character has access to, the game assumes that in typical settlements you can find and purchase anything with an item level no greater than your character level + 1, and at major settlements items up to your character level + 2. The GM can restrict access to some items (even those of an appropriate level) or make items of a higher level available for purchase (possibly at a greatly increased price or in return for a favor done for the seller).

Ok that makes no sense, so if the PCs basically hang around Absalom Station higher level items appear for purchase as they level?


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It's more like Absalom Station has an abundance of items they're more willing to sell you despite your low level/lack of requisite license other communities would require (level+2).


yeah, you look too poor so they don't want to sell to you.

Grand Lodge

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More like you don't have access to the proper licenses required to own such an item or the connections to actually find a seller of one.

Scarab Sages

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It's an abstraction is several factors including licenses, black market connections, bribes, permits, aviailibilty, military or law enforcement rank, gang membership and so on.

Basically it's a simplified system to make gameplay easier without going into too much detail. If as a GM, you desire more detail and a more realistic and less abstract system for your arms sellers, you are free to do so.


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And, as noted, it's an ASSUMPTION of the game. You don't have to make it as a GM. You can let them spend all their cash on one awesome gun. You can give them starting gear. You can push them out the airlock naked (good job picking Android as your race!). But the default assumption is that PCs have a certain amount of wealth at each level, and generally don't get access to items very far above their level.

Starfinder and Pathfinder both have quirky (being charitable) economics already, but I think the item level assumptions being spelled out right in the gear lists is pretty straightforward for GMs and players to use.


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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Besides, it'd be a rare case where the PCs have enough money to buy anything beyond Level +2, anyway. Even if its allowed, you need the funds, and prices go up pretty sharply. Note that "The whole party pools their funds to buy one really good item" comes with its own downsides.


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Imbicatus wrote:

It's an abstraction is several factors including licenses, black market connections, bribes, permits, aviailibilty, military or law enforcement rank, gang membership and so on.

Basically it's a simplified system to make gameplay easier without going into too much detail. If as a GM, you desire more detail and a more realistic and less abstract system for your arms sellers, you are free to do so.

Sorry, but that's just not on. If it represents your literal right to buy said item, why does it change based on where you are buying something? If it's about availability, why can two characters in the same party go into the same town and come out with different lists of items? The combination doesn't make a right out of two wrongs, it makes it even more silly: at one point you're going to walk into a store, they're going to have the item in question because they'll sell it to your mate, but while you have every right to buy it you have to go into the big city and spend your money there instead.

Call a spade a spade: it's a game balance issue to deal with the possibility of characters finagling more money than they should have at a particular level. The main protection is the exponentially rising cost of items by level, and this is a pressure release valve if circumstances get too far from the norm. It doesn't make sense, but you aren't supposed to look at it.


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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

1. Because a giant metropolis has more options available, and so you have an easier time finding merchants who will give you the time of day, bend rules, have inventory they will sell to a non-standard customer, etc?

2. Because different characters have different reputations, different affiliations, different licenses, different contacts? Though the only way that would happen in the same party is if somehow different PCs are different levels.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Or they have different Infamy levels, if you are using that SFS rule.

Liberty's Edge

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Kitsch Zero wrote:
Sorry, but that's just not on. If it represents your literal right to buy said item, why does it change based on where you are buying something? If it's about availability, why can two characters in the same party go into the same town and come out with different lists of items?

They can? Two PCs in the same party are the same level and have access to the same gear, or thereabouts. Even assuming different levels, those different levels represent different levels of access, different permits, and so on.

I have friends with permits to carry weapons I don't have the permits for in real life, after all.

Kitsch Zero wrote:
The combination doesn't make a right out of two wrongs, it makes it even more silly: at one point you're going to walk into a store, they're going to have the item in question because they'll sell it to your mate, but while you have every right to buy it you have to go into the big city and spend your money there instead.

Huh? That doesn't necessarily follow. The easiest alternative (fully supported by the rules and description) is as follows:

You have a legal right to Level + 1 Items. However, in a big city you can go to an effective black market and manage to acquire Level + 2 items.

The actual explanation may well be more complicated than that, but it's a logical way to work things and makes sense.

Kitsch Zero wrote:
Call a spade a spade: it's a game balance issue to deal with the possibility of characters finagling more money than they should have at a particular level. The main protection is the exponentially rising cost of items by level, and this is a pressure release valve if circumstances get too far from the norm. It doesn't make sense, but you aren't supposed to look at it.

It is a game balance issue, but it also follows pretty well logically. It certainly makes sense enough to me.


Metaphysician wrote:

1. Because a giant metropolis has more options available, and so you have an easier time finding merchants who will give you the time of day, bend rules, have inventory they will sell to a non-standard customer, etc?

2. Because different characters have different reputations, different affiliations, different licenses, different contacts? Though the only way that would happen in the same party is if somehow different PCs are different levels.

Alright, let's test your abstraction with a realistic scenario. I'll talk about computers, even though I'm not sure if it's official that their level is twice their tier. I assume that'll be FAQ'd later.

I'm 2nd level, my friend is 4th. We need computers for an urgent mission. In a large town, we go shopping together. She gets a tier 3, I must make do with a tier 2. Why?

Bearing that reason in mind, during the mission I find a small arm. I don't use small arms, my friend wants it. She trades for the tier 3 computer. Am I now a criminal? Am I carrying contraband? What if I found it on a corpse?

Bearing those reasons in mind, I break my tier 2, and need to buy a new one fast. I'm in a small town. I show the shopkeep my tier 2 and ask for that model. They have tier 2s in stock, because my friend is with me. Why won't they sell me a replacement? Have I just admitted to a crime? Is my legal status in a Quantum state, depending on the size of town I'm in?

Nothing of this makes any sense. It adds nothing to the game, and touches all sorts of areas of roleplay that both come up often, and should not have In Character meddling. It has to be a rule for game balance, not a real gameworld obstruction.

Liberty's Edge

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Kitsch Zero wrote:
Alright, let's test your abstraction with a realistic scenario. I'll talk about computers, even though I'm not sure if it's official that their level is twice their tier. I assume that'll be FAQ'd later.

Sure. We'll assume a Tier 2 Computer is Level 4 and a Tier 3 is Level 6 for this.

Kitsch Zero wrote:
I'm 2nd level, my friend is 4th. We need computers for an urgent mission. In a large town, we go shopping together. She gets a tier 3, I must make do with a tier 2. Why?

You don't have either the contacts (whether legal or illegal) and/or legal permits to acquire what amounts to decently high end hacking rig?

Kitsch Zero wrote:
Bearing that reason in mind, during the mission I find a small arm. I don't use small arms, my friend wants it. She trades for the tier 3 computer. Am I now a criminal? Am I carrying contraband? What if I found it on a corpse?

You may well have been a criminal well before that, but whether you're a criminal is a GM call. Regardless, it's the same whether your friend gave it to you or you found it.

Kitsch Zero wrote:
Bearing those reasons in mind, I break my tier 2, and need to buy a new one fast. I'm in a small town. I show the shopkeep my tier 2 and ask for that model. They have tier 2s in stock, because my friend is with me. Why won't they sell me a replacement? Have I just admitted to a crime? Is my legal status in a Quantum state, depending on the size of town I'm in?

No, your legality is the same everywhere. Whether the computer is illegal or legal just determines which of several reasons the guy might not sell to you:

1. Assuming it's illegal, he doesn't know you. Even if he's got one, selling to a guy he doesn't know is a great way to get caught in a sting. A PC of sufficient level can call one of their criminal contacts to vouch for them.

2. Assuming it's legal...this guy still doesn't know you and you're asking to purchase a piece of technology often used for illegal activities (ie: hacking). Why would he sell to you and risk the police coming down on him like a ton of bricks when your dumb ass gets caught hacking the Mayor's private files?

3. Again assuming it's legal, you lack the proper permit. You got one in that big city you were in where you got your old device, but it's a harder permit to get in places where the specific person who issues it might be held responsible for what you do with it.

Any item above level 2 or 3 is a custom job, military hardware, or something equally specific and difficult to acquire. Something random people on the street do not have and cannot easily get. It's something you go to high end stores or shady black market dealers for and is quite possibly custom designed. People being unwilling to sell such things to some guy they've never heard of, and the permits to get it being tricky and location dependent both seems totally reasonable to me.

Kitsch Zero wrote:

Nothing of this makes any sense. It adds nothing to the game, and touches all sorts of areas of roleplay that both come up often, and should not have In Character meddling. It has to be a rule for game balance, not a real gameworld obstruction.

No, it can easily be both. Availability codes for things have a long history in some sci-fi RPGs (Shadowrun has a robust system for this, for example), but have always had the issue of tending towards being pretty complex. The level thing is an easy abstraction of the combination of legal/bureaucratic loopholes and contacts, both legal and illegal, necessary to get high end military hardware.

The Exchange

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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I'm specifically referencing computers in this because of my IRL experience, but the concepts remain the same across all types of equipment, regardless.

Long story short: I was a frothy computer nerd in the era where home computers just became a thing. The stuff we had access to was sold through Sears and the like (VIC 20s, etc.) Found my first actual computer store. I started looking at the fancy computers. The dealer looked me over a couple times, grabbed me by the shoulder and pushed me over to an Apple II playing a crap version of Centipede in a corner by itself. In other words, he didn’t even entertain the notion of selling me a high level machine because I looked like a kid.

It’s just an anecdote, but “You’re not old enough to have it” has been an actual thing in our own society.

For an in-game reason, sure. You want to spend your cash on a Level 4 machine, I will up-sell your <colorful euphemism> all day long. The fact that you don’t have the relevant experience to work it (be it through professional training, OJT or “I just tinkered until it worked”) means that I won’t let it operate higher than your level +1. Might even force a penalty on you because you don’t know what you’re doing and just deleted the root directory, etc.

Just because you bought a router doesn’t mean you earned your Cisco networking certificate and have optimized your home network.

In other words, your character level represents you as the whole person, not just you the techno-wizard. So much of that is abstraction and includes your knowledge and skills beyond what’s directly portrayed in the game. Level 1 gets you the right to work on Computer 1 and 2 systems, just enough knowledge to log in and accidentally delete the file structure.

It’s not a perfect paradigm, but it’s good enough. If arguments persist then it’s not really about the system and you will have to look more at the motivation behind the argument. After all, we're demanding extreme logic and structure from "Wizards and Warp Drives". I'm not sure that can reasonably be found.


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First of all, very few groups in my experience play with characters at different levels any more - it's quite irregular to have a level difference intra-group since 2nd edition D&D.

Secondly, restricted purchases is absolutely a thing in real life, it doesn't matter that I know an army general and he likes me, I can't purchase a rocket launcher, while if he were to put in the effort he could probably "appropriate" pne.


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For an alternative handwave, AbadarCorp keeps insanely detailed dossiers of everyone. Ever. Because they're paranoid about profits. You being able to buy things at retailers is limited by AbadarCorp's willingness to release the funds or honour the credstick, and they won't do that at certain locations until you've achieved some notoriety and demonstrated a certain level of general competence. In larger cities with larger police forces, you have a little more leeway because if the corporation bets wrong, you won't be a threat for long.


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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Its not even just a matter of licensing. Higher level gear is more expensive gear, sold implicitly by higher end, more exclusive dealers. The level requirement also covers "Actually getting an appointment with a dealer who will let you in the front door and give you the time of day".

Having sufficient level means that the Future Ferrari Dealer doesn't waste bin your appointment request as being from some window shopper just looking to test drive for fun. After all, "real" shoppers will have suitable credit ratings, since nobody purchases something this high end in cash. . . well, unless they actually *do* have a reputation for being filthy rich and buying luxury cars with wads of hundreds. Said public reputation *also* being a valid aspect of level.

Now, you could go to a store that doesn't care about credit ratings or the appearance of propriety, they just care if the money is good, preferably in cash right now, no refunds. However, those kinds of sketchier establishments are *also* the ones where you'd need a reputation to do business there, because they don't want to be cheated or caught in some law enforcement operation. If you don't smell right, they'll show you the door ( or possibly shoot you, if its sketchy enough ). The rep and savvy to deal with such, *also* a valid aspect of level.


So much extrapolation just to work around a bad mechanic.

Liberty's Edge

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simplygnome wrote:
So much extrapolation just to work around a bad mechanic.

Firstly, it's a pretty good mechanic.

Secondly...this isn't 'working around it' this is literally using the intended explanation from the book but with specific examples.


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Yes, I really liked that star trek episode where Kirk finally upgraded to his plasma caster at the Federation weapon depot.

Fire fly improved so much when Jayne got rid of Vera because he leveled up.

Also I really liked lukes plasma sword upgrades, all 5 of them, throughout the movies. It really creates emotional impact.

Bad mechanic and it stifles role play. Mainly it wasn't a needed mechanic and creates more problems and barriers to rp than it solves.

Liberty's Edge

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Ah! You're objecting to the whole idea of leveled gear, not the leveled gear/availability connection.

That's a much more defensible position, thematically, and I can only respond with noting that anything that maintains the same equipment doesn't tend to work so well mechanically with a system featuring the vast power level changes in Starfinder. Not if you want equipment to mean anything, anyway.

And they clearly want equipment to be meaningful.


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

I imagine they will release an upgrade system or something along those lines that will allow you to stick with your family heirloom, while also keeping it up to par with other level appropriate weapons.

It would be easy for them to make something akin to the solarion crystal mechanic, but then say something like "the sum of the levels of the upgrade and the level of the base weapon can't exceed your character level + 2."

After that, they would just need to balance the numbers for the appropriate levels.

It would even be balanced against existing systems, such as infusions, as your has weapon level would remain low, limiting the kinds of infusions you could stack with upgrades (unless the new upgrade mechanic also raises your weapon's base level).


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I read the rule and figured it made sense based on old PF/DnD clerics. A cleric "knows" every spell in their spell list and prays to their gods for spells. No matter how rightous the cause, no matter how fervent the faith, a cleric must be 17th level to cast Miracle. Because in game at that level is when a god can trust their follower to wield that level of power in their name. Same thing here, no one wants to be the one who traded a first level nobody their spaceship for a rifle that does 15d6 points of damage and blew up half a ward. Helps me justify it even more when in the book gods of technology and commerce exist, who also want to see that from happening.

As far as iconic sci fi characters keeping iconic gear, we know Jane upgraded Vera, and that Master Luke built his own lightsaber. As a DM, I would allow players to do the same, just costs the same as buying new


Olav wrote:

I read the rule and figured it made sense based on old PF/DnD clerics. A cleric "knows" every spell in their spell list and prays to their gods for spells. No matter how rightous the cause, no matter how fervent the faith, a cleric must be 17th level to cast Miracle. Because in game at that level is when a god can trust their follower to wield that level of power in their name. Same thing here, no one wants to be the one who traded a first level nobody their spaceship for a rifle that does 15d6 points of damage and blew up half a ward. Helps me justify it even more when in the book gods of technology and commerce exist, who also want to see that from happening.

As far as iconic sci fi characters keeping iconic gear, we know Jane upgraded Vera, and that Master Luke built his own lightsaber. As a DM, I would allow players to do the same, just costs the same as buying new

All the players need to craft their own gear is ranks in the right skill and enough Universal Polymer Base to make the item in question. No feat taxes or casting levels or anything.

It is, incidentally, why I think Soldiers get engineering as a class skill. The hard-bitten mercenary who knows how to take his gun apart and put it back together would be that much harder to realize if they didn't have that skill.


Now that I remember properly, Jayne took Vera from "the best" of a group of people who came to kill him. So there you go, you want a better computer then the one you got? Go pick a fight with someone three levels higher then you. DnD!


Deadmanwalking wrote:

Ah! You're objecting to the whole idea of leveled gear, not the leveled gear/availability connection.

That's a much more defensible position, thematically, and I can only respond with noting that anything that maintains the same equipment doesn't tend to work so well mechanically with a system featuring the vast power level changes in Starfinder. Not if you want equipment to mean anything, anyway.

And they clearly want equipment to be meaningful.

Thank you for the response and seeing my end of the argument. I think you summed up better than I did the disconnect I have with the game. Starfinder definitely pushes equipment being meaningful, just like any "Finder" game or DnD. I on the other hand want less emphasis for theme.

Going forward, instead of calling it a bad system, I think I can just clearly enunciate that the system is gear focused versus my preference.

Also to get around it in the future, perhaps the idea would be to just have them upgrade in downtime, almost like leveling, like the examples given by the other posters such as Luke building his own saber and Jayne with Veras upgrades (again, all between and in downtime). Seems like a good medium.


simplygnome wrote:
Deadmanwalking wrote:

Ah! You're objecting to the whole idea of leveled gear, not the leveled gear/availability connection.

That's a much more defensible position, thematically, and I can only respond with noting that anything that maintains the same equipment doesn't tend to work so well mechanically with a system featuring the vast power level changes in Starfinder. Not if you want equipment to mean anything, anyway.

And they clearly want equipment to be meaningful.

Thank you for the response and seeing my end of the argument. I think you summed up better than I did the disconnect I have with the game. Starfinder definitely pushes equipment being meaningful, just like any "Finder" game or DnD. I on the other hand want less emphasis for theme.

Going forward, instead of calling it a bad system, I think I can just clearly enunciate that the system is gear focused versus my preference.

Also to get around it in the future, perhaps the idea would be to just have them upgrade in downtime, almost like leveling, like the examples given by the other posters such as Luke building his own saber and Jayne with Veras upgrades (again, all between and in downtime). Seems like a good medium.

You can pretty much use the prices from the gear tables and just call it 'upgrades' instead of new weapons unless the player actually wants a weapon from a new category.

However, I would point out that most characters don't have a narrative connection to their weapon. A gun is a gun, and buying a better one when it's available is exactly what many characters (not players, but characters) would do without a second thought. Kirk would have always picked the best phaser in the armory, and would not hesitate to requisition newer models. Jayne would take the best weapon he could find besides Vera, by any legal or criminal means necessary.

In a game system where players level and increase drastically in power by doing so, their equipment must do the same. I don't think it's very reasonable to complain about scaling gear in a level-based RPG. It's at the very core nature of the system, and absolutely necessary for balance.

If you want to give players the option to upgrade narratively important weaponry that's fine, and very easily done. Making decisions like that is the primary role of the DM, which the developers acknowledge and is why they don't spell out every possible variant or alternative to their rules.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Eh, you *can* have a system where gear is static while levels are not. It just would take a *lot* of work to turn a D&Derivative into a system like that. By the time you succeeded, it'd probably not really resemble D&D anymore.


Metaphysician wrote:
Eh, you *can* have a system where gear is static while levels are not. It just would take a *lot* of work to turn a D&Derivative into a system like that. By the time you succeeded, it'd probably not really resemble D&D anymore.

Can you give an actual example of a game that does this, because otherwise you're just saying it's theoretically possible. Of course it's theoretically possible, most things are. However, theoretically possible is vastly different than "doable in a way that's fun and balanced." Unless you make a level-based system where gear simply doesn't matter, the gear must scale with the characters or it becomes a broken mechanic and breaks any class that relies on gear.

Of course, if you just posted to be snarky about D&D systems without having any counter arguments or better ideas, I understand. Sarcasm is easy, after all.


Simple, the scaling of gear happens to the character instead.

+X? The character gets the bonus, not the weapon.
Flaming? The character can imbue whatever weapon he wields with the power of fire, similar to the suli racial.

The character gets these abilities as he levels up.

It is the Inherent bonuses from Unchained expanded slightly to include weapon/armor special abilities. All charcters are now mechanically similar to a soulknife and his mindblade.

If you want to keep to gold sink aspect, it could take expensive rituals (with expensive components, which may be found on quests) to perform the power increase.


MOST games do what you're referring to. The minor +1 to +3 upgardes in DND arent naively tied to the math in -most- systems so you can easily go without upgrades and still continue through more monsters.

5e is amazing for that in that weapon upgrades can be completely avoided, and the math still holds. Damage increases come from the player not the eq.

Most games DONT upgrade weapons as Starfinder does, but instead the character gets better.

So no "In a game system where players level and increase drastically in power by doing so, their equipment must do the same" is entirely false as MOST rpgs dont do that as a requirement. Thats a video game mentality and is not in MOST table top rpgs.


But again I concede the point where Starfinder was trying to go, however absolutely dont agree with Space McManns assertion that gear must increase - this is in fact not base DnD is run, with gear HAVING to increase at such a drastic level to keep up with numbers.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Space McMan wrote:
Metaphysician wrote:
Eh, you *can* have a system where gear is static while levels are not. It just would take a *lot* of work to turn a D&Derivative into a system like that. By the time you succeeded, it'd probably not really resemble D&D anymore.

Can you give an actual example of a game that does this, because otherwise you're just saying it's theoretically possible. Of course it's theoretically possible, most things are. However, theoretically possible is vastly different than "doable in a way that's fun and balanced." Unless you make a level-based system where gear simply doesn't matter, the gear must scale with the characters or it becomes a broken mechanic and breaks any class that relies on gear.

Of course, if you just posted to be snarky about D&D systems without having any counter arguments or better ideas, I understand. Sarcasm is easy, after all.

Not snarky at all, actually. The main system to pop to mind is Mutants & Masterminds. Equipment in M&M has no particular need to scale much, or at all, depending on the character. A swords & sorcery hero can very easily start with a +4 broadsword, and keep using it their entire career even as they go up several PLs. What they increase instead are their Strength, BAB, and feats. Same applies for most other superhero-based games I've seen, since they take the general philosophy of "equipment is a supplement, the real focus is the character".

Exalted is another decent example. While gear upgrades are valuable, they tend to be fairly uncommon ( as opposed to gear *additions*, where you acquire something that does a *new* thing ). An exalt PC might only replace their main weapon with a newer, better one once or twice in their entire career. And even with that, the benefit of the upgraded equipment is still fairly small, compared with the benefits of the upgraded skills and charms of the PC themselves.

Its been a long while since I last saw it, but the first d20 version of the Star Wars RPG was also a pretty good example, IIRC. Gear was useful and important, but basically didn't scale at all. All the meaningful upgrades came from your class abilities, including both base AC and bonus weapon damage, such that it wasn't very far before you basically only wore armor for style or secondary functions.

Essentially, the key to not needing scaling equipment, is to make sure that equipment doesn't bottleneck the capacities of the scaling hero. If damage and defense and whatnot are based primarily on the PC's skill codes, then you don't need to replace Weapon +1 with Weapon +10, because their damage already grows proportionate with their level.


Star Wars Saga basically has the same weapons at all levels or at the very least does not scale anywhere near this game.

An x-wing or rifle is basically the same for a level 1 and level 20. But the character abilities make the difference.

There are licenses and restrictions but they are more about RP, skill checks, and setting than character level and the scale is nowhere near Starfinder. A level 10 character has to abide by the same license and restriction rules as a level 2.

The two systems even share a designer. Both are d20 but Saga is not meant to be an acquisition game as much. I like Starfinder but I also like systems where the character is the star more than the weapon.


Personally my favorite is a system designed where basic gear is pretty functional all the way through but there is some potential scaling, usually expressed via magical/ultra high end/experimental/unknown equipment. A little bit of a middle ground between Starfiner and no scaling whatsoever.

Metaphysician wrote:
Eh, you *can* have a system where gear is static while levels are not. It just would take a *lot* of work to turn a D&Derivative into a system like that. By the time you succeeded, it'd probably not really resemble D&D anymore.

That seems like a bit of an overstatement.

At the bare minimum all you need to flatten the gear curve is shift the bonuses that come from gear somewhere else.

You could go farther and try to re-engineer the game's math around flatter gear, but that's not necessary and the game would still look like Starfinder at the end of it, just Starfinder with different HP calculations.

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