How will you change Starfinder in your home games?


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Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Society Subscriber

That sounded decent, until I read the last five words.

Players around here are commonly still trying figure out what they want to do when their turn comes up, so asking at the start of a new round what they would want to do would slow everything back down trying to figure out which dice they need to use, or if the last person in the previous round did something that would invalidate their chosen tactic so they have to rethink what they were going to do.

How would readied actions and delays work?


That looks a lot like AD&D 2E weapon speeds.

Besides the picking and choosing what I want to use from Starfinder, I want to continue building on my Forbidden Colors setting over on Reddit.com/r/worldbuilding.


IonutRO wrote:
That sounds needlessly complicated.

I have a group that eats complicated for breakfast lunch and dinner. They're all rules lawyers and optimizers, who LOVE complicated. The more obscure the rules, the happier they all get.


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That houserule adds a ton of bookkeeping and effort into playing the game without any meaningful benefit out of it.
I think it's pointless and even counter-productive.
If static initiative is the problem, rerolling it is simpler than keeping track of all the types of dice.


Mashallah wrote:

That houserule adds a ton of bookkeeping and effort into playing the game without any meaningful benefit out of it.

I think it's pointless and even counter-productive.
If static initiative is the problem, rerolling it is simpler than keeping track of all the types of dice.

That doesn't solve the problem of "everyone will build Dex" initiative creep of a gun heavy game.


Remy P Gilbeau wrote:
Mashallah wrote:

That houserule adds a ton of bookkeeping and effort into playing the game without any meaningful benefit out of it.

I think it's pointless and even counter-productive.
If static initiative is the problem, rerolling it is simpler than keeping track of all the types of dice.
That doesn't solve the problem of "everyone will build Dex" initiative creep of a gun heavy game.

Then just remove DEX bonus to init from the game. That sounds like a far simpler and easier to use houserule.


Mashallah wrote:
Remy P Gilbeau wrote:
Mashallah wrote:

That houserule adds a ton of bookkeeping and effort into playing the game without any meaningful benefit out of it.

I think it's pointless and even counter-productive.
If static initiative is the problem, rerolling it is simpler than keeping track of all the types of dice.
That doesn't solve the problem of "everyone will build Dex" initiative creep of a gun heavy game.
Then just remove DEX bonus to init from the game. That sounds like a far simpler and easier to use houserule.

A fair point. I still would like to try out this crazy die based initiative rule, just because it looks neat. It may fail. It may explode catastrophically, but that's half the fun of testing really out-there systems. If it doesn't work out, you can fall back to the tried and true.


If your group wants more dice rolling then this sounds like a great system Remy :)

It makes a fair bit of sense too. A dagger swipe *should* most time happen faster than a gigantic axe swing.


I'll remove the restriction on only being able to wear two magic items. I want my Starfinder be "Sci-fi Fantasy" not "Space Opera with a pinch of magic".


It doesn't mean you can't carry around 5000 potions, swords, scrolls, armies, and wands, though. It seems that it's reserved for truly wondrous items that can do unique things which you can't achieve through consumables or armor mods.


IonutRO wrote:
It doesn't mean you can't carry around 5000 potions, swords, scrolls, armies, and wands, though. It seems that it's reserved for truly wondrous items that can do unique things which you can't achieve through consumables or armor mods.

Except the magic I want is through wondrous items not just "spells in a bottle". Scrolls/Wands/Potions are the most boring form of magic item and armour/weapons tend to not give the best utility outside of combat.


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Pathfinder Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Milo v3 wrote:
IonutRO wrote:
It doesn't mean you can't carry around 5000 potions, swords, scrolls, armies, and wands, though. It seems that it's reserved for truly wondrous items that can do unique things which you can't achieve through consumables or armor mods.
Except the magic I want is through wondrous items not just "spells in a bottle". Scrolls/Wands/Potions are the most boring form of magic item and armour/weapons tend to not give the best utility outside of combat.

I think it's been said that magic weapons will only be getting cool abilities, rather than any numeric bonuses. I wouldn't be surprised if some weapons or weapon "infusions" give out of combat utility. That's just speculation though.

We don know that armor will definitely have out of combat utility, like doubling as a space-suit, built in jet packs, maybe even an exoskeleton to increase your carrying capacity.


Probably toss out the 'classic' races (dwarves, elves, etc).


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Zhayne wrote:
Probably toss out the 'classic' races (dwarves, elves, etc).

Gasp! *faints*


Remy P Gilbeau wrote:

Matthew Colvillerecently made a video detailing an alternative initiative system that worked based upon what you were going to do in a given round, with each type of action (melee attack, ranged attack, spell, move) being assigned a different die value, and while I love of dynamic initiative, this system was created by 5e's writer for 5e. I feel it would get bogged down in the sheer action economy of Pathfinder... but!

Starfinder's action economy has been streamlined in such a way that I feel would be ideal for a system like this.

A very quick and dirty version of the system would look something like:

Operative weapons and other light quick weapons roll a d4.
Simple Melee and Small Arms rolls a d6
Advanced Melee, Long Arms, and Sniper Rifles roll a d8.
Heavy and Unweildy Weapons roll a d12.
Spell casting rolls a d8+ the spell's level.
Move actions, class features, and other actions outside of the actions listed above would add a d6 to the total.

When you take a Full Attack, you add the penalty to your attacks to the dice rolls. -4 to hit becomes +4 to your initiative, when low numbers are good. This allows feats that make you better at Full Attacking, like Multi-Weapon Fighting to help your initiative as well. Feats such as Improved Initiative do something like: "decrease the largest die you roll in a turn by 1 size" (taking the d8 a Spell Caster rolls down to a d6+ Spell Level and so on.)

Obviously this needs tweaking, I haven't actually seen how the weapons look yet, or if Cantrips got the 5e treatment, and this doesn't address Swift Actions and other "barely-an-action"s, but I mean to give it a shot at my table.

With everyone incentivized to build Dex for all the guns, it simply makes sense to me to separate Dex from some of it's long-held potency, removing it from the initiative calculation, and making the fights more dynamic, and based around Player choice, turn by turn.

If you're doing something like that, you might want to throw out rounds entirely. Call it 'Ticks' or seconds, and your initiative is how long you take before your action comes round again. Movement would be something you did continuously, but couldn't be combined with aiming a gun or casting a spell.


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Mashallah wrote:
That houserule adds a ton of bookkeeping and effort into playing the game without any meaningful benefit out of it.

It should fit right in with a 3.5e derived game then!

*ba dum tsh*

Zhayne wrote:
Probably toss out the 'classic' races (dwarves, elves, etc).

People like you are why Starfinder's elves are the way they are. For shame!

Liberty's Edge

Bluenose wrote:
Remy P Gilbeau wrote:

Matthew Colvillerecently made a video detailing an alternative initiative system that worked based upon what you were going to do in a given round, with each type of action (melee attack, ranged attack, spell, move) being assigned a different die value, and while I love of dynamic initiative, this system was created by 5e's writer for 5e. I feel it would get bogged down in the sheer action economy of Pathfinder... but!

Starfinder's action economy has been streamlined in such a way that I feel would be ideal for a system like this.

A very quick and dirty version of the system would look something like:

Operative weapons and other light quick weapons roll a d4.
Simple Melee and Small Arms rolls a d6
Advanced Melee, Long Arms, and Sniper Rifles roll a d8.
Heavy and Unweildy Weapons roll a d12.
Spell casting rolls a d8+ the spell's level.
Move actions, class features, and other actions outside of the actions listed above would add a d6 to the total.

When you take a Full Attack, you add the penalty to your attacks to the dice rolls. -4 to hit becomes +4 to your initiative, when low numbers are good. This allows feats that make you better at Full Attacking, like Multi-Weapon Fighting to help your initiative as well. Feats such as Improved Initiative do something like: "decrease the largest die you roll in a turn by 1 size" (taking the d8 a Spell Caster rolls down to a d6+ Spell Level and so on.)

Obviously this needs tweaking, I haven't actually seen how the weapons look yet, or if Cantrips got the 5e treatment, and this doesn't address Swift Actions and other "barely-an-action"s, but I mean to give it a shot at my table.

With everyone incentivized to build Dex for all the guns, it simply makes sense to me to separate Dex from some of it's long-held potency, removing it from the initiative calculation, and making the fights more dynamic, and based around Player choice, turn by

...

2nd Edition Exalted had an initiative system something like that.


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Probably turn it into spelljammer.


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Here is some preliminary work on finding places for the Forgotten Realms and Eberron within Starfinder.

Abeir-Toril
During the centuries that followed the Spellplague, the proliferation of magic continued to grow despite the efforts of the Church of Mystra, with more and more dangerous uses of this magic. Terrorists continued to use blue fire to attack the fabric of reality itself, puncturing the universe and creating soft spots that bled through to Abeir from Toril. Technology was developed in an effort to combat the reckless use of magic and tools were finally developed that could contain the damaged areas. However not before Abeir itself was destroyed and the land of Faerun was wracked and sent into upheval.

The elves retreated from Toril once more. With the Faerie Plane unstable due to the use of blue magic, the elves retreated on their starships.
Refugees fled Faerun to Maztica and across the Hordelands to Kara-Tur. Resources in Kara-Tur became strained and so additional resources were sought offworld. With the other inhabitants of the greater Toril Galaxy present, war continued to come to Toril and it's inhabitants with Kara-Tur's resources strained enough as it was, the Torilian fleet did not fare well.

What occurred during the gap is a mystery. But it resulted in Faerun becoming a wilderness land inhabited by medieval peoples who have no recollection of Abeir-Toril's ancient past. Instead they live simple lives in fear of the dragons that rule the skies and regularly demand tribute. To the east are the hordelands while to the far east are a wastelands filled with exotic ruins with highly advanced technology. Kara-Tur is no more on Toril.

Beyond Toril's reach, the remnants of the Kara-Tur's fleet (known today as the Fleet of the Lung Federation) exists with a portion of it trapped in the Golarion galaxy. Unknown to them, they are hunted and chased by the forces of the Dragon Lords who now rule Abeir-Toril. The Dragon Lords fleet of drift ships scour the Toril galaxy looking for any remnants of the Lung Federation. Although it is only a matter of time before they discover that some escaped to Golarion's galaxy.

Eberron
The birth of the Mournlands saw a deep cold war envelop across Eberron with each of the super powers building greater and greater weapons. It was only a matter of time before someone would unleash one. When the Mournlands began to spread the neighbouring nations unleashed their arsenal of weapons against their enemies who in turn unleashed their own weapons. The face of Eberron was forever ruined, with none, not even the dragons of Argonessen or the Quori lords of Riedra were safe from the destruction.

The survivors were forced to escape into the depths of Khyber where they were faced with the radioactive presence of the Khyberan crystals and the overlords that dwelled within. With great determination, effort and technology the survivors were able to carve out strongholds for themselves and eventually beat back the corruptive forces of Khyber. Over the centuries and millenia that followed they transformed the core of Eberron into a giant dyson sphere through the use of both powerful magics and technology. This new land they created for themselves was immense and could have provided for the population of Eberron for millenia to come.

Not content with simply transforming their entire world, the powerful technomancers of Eberron harnessed the power of the Rings of Siberys and aligned them in such a way as to allow Eberron to leave it's home star and hurtle through it's galaxy.

Following the end of the Gap Eberron is located in a nexus between galaxies and has become a trade hub for those civilizations that discover how to travel to and from Eberron. The likelihood of someone accidentally reaching Eberron through a standard drift ship is extremely small. But those ships equipped with specially aligned dragonshards are able to detect the Eberron beacon which allows travel to and from the planet from any of the neighbouring galaxies. As such a new civilization is much more likely to gain access to Eberron by the inhabitants of Eberron making peaceful contact with them. There is also a chance that a small group of traders may find a derelict trade ship that does have the dragonshards contained within it and can then replace their own navigation system with those, thus granting them the ability to detect the Eberron drift beacon.

The population of Eberron currently numbers the trillions upon trillions with countless species making up the societies within the planet. Most of these new species were simply present following the Gap with only fragments of their history known to them. It is likely some of these people are refugees from dead worlds, while others are equally likely to have been simply traders who forgot the location of their homeworlds following the Gap.

One strange omission among the people of Eberron are the Warforged. There isn't a single Warforged present within all of Eberron with no record of when they left or why they did. They were simply an integral part of Eberron society before the Gap and simply ceased to exist following the Gap.


Isn't there a god in forgotten realms that intentionally prevents technological development?


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IonutRO wrote:
Isn't there a god in forgotten realms that intentionally prevents technological development?

Sorta, not really but kinda yes. But gods can die and be reborn in the Forgotten Realms and so there is no need for that god to have continued to be in power at the point where the anti-magic technology was developed.

Furthermore there is a god of invention and according to the AD&D 2e sourcebook there was a timeline in which arquebas would become commonplace. Furthermore the gods are more distant (both in the creator's own personal Realms and also the D&D 5e Realms) and so other than "gun powder doesn't work" there is no meaningful limitation on technological development on Toril.

In addition you could handwaive the entire "technology doesn't work" as a superstition spread by people who didn't know better.

Finally it's my Forgotten Realms so I'll do what I want :P

In all seriousness, starships are a thing that exist in Forgotten Realms. So even if you want technology to be stunted on Toril itself. There is nothing stopping someone from importing technology from outside of the Toril sphere of influence.

Here is my current take on Starfinder Elves.

Elves
Elves of Castrovel consider themselves to be natives to the planet and explorers of the star system of which Castrovel is a part of. They consider Castrovel to be their true home, although historians who have combed through the most ancient of elven records have pieced together evidence that Castrovel may not, in fact, be the true birthplace of elves. These elves have historically been branded heretics by the Soyverian elves.

Following the Gap the elves of Soyverian found ancient sites had been dug up revealing once and for all that not only did elves once upon a time routinely travel beyond Castrovel's sun, but they were in fact from another planet. Those who discovered these uncovered ruins were quick to hide the evidence and hide the revelation from as many elves as they could. The leaders, fearing what this could mean for their society, withdrew from the greater star system and became even more xenophobic than before.

A conspiracy has formed to keep this terrible secret from the majority of elven civilization for fear of what impact it might have upon the elven people who are still reeling from the effects of the Gap. But there are those elves who believe the history of their people lies in the stars themselves and so they rebel against the authorities of Sovyrian and seek to explore the planets and stars beyond Castrovel for themselves.

In truth, the elves of Sovyrian are simply one offshoot of an ancient and pervasive species. Over the eons elves have come to inhabit many worlds and galaxies with interstellar elven empires rising and falling over the millenia. There are plenty of ruins of elven civilizations waiting to be discovered among many worlds, some of which have direct ties to the elves of Castrovel.

----
For those playing along: the elves of Toril are related to the elves of Eberron and are related to the elves of Golarion and are related to the elves of Greyhawk in my head-canon. I have a single origin point for every species in the D&D universe (halflings and humans originate from Earth). Starfinder might be the first chance I get to take it from my head and into the actual gaming table :)


Yeah, starjammers do exist, but they're magical, not technology.


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Right. And in the Forgotten Realms the reach of the gods is not infinite so you can simply import technology from other worlds.

Ultimately I dislike the gods as NPCs that 2e through to 4e took when it came to DR and it's gods. It's not the most interesting way to handle them and it's not how Ed Greenwood does it in his home campaign. It also removes a crapload of agency from players. So when the books say "God X does Y" I replace it with "The church of God X does Y". As such saying "A God bans technological development" gets replaced with "The church of a God works to stop and ban technological development" and for the first time ever this is how the Forgotten Realms are being officially handled in D&D 5e.

So I don't really see how my writeup of a post apocalyptic Realms set thousands of years in the future is inconsistent with a particular God not liking technology.


I was just saying that spelljammers are a form of magic item. As for how gods work, within a God's sphere its will is law (at least in 3.x), it's how Mystra forced everyone to use the weave when in other spheres magic worked without it.

Edit: What i mean to say is that Gods should actually have influence over their sphere of influence. A God of tech should be able to dictate how tech works and doesn't within realms that it rules over as God of tech.


Steven "Troll" O'Neal wrote:
Zhayne wrote:
Probably toss out the 'classic' races (dwarves, elves, etc).
Gasp! *faints*

Probably do the reverse for most of the random new ones. The appeal of the idea was always akin to Shadowrun or Warhammer 40k - e.g. a traditional fantasy setting set in a futuristic setting.

While a few of the new ones seem okay (androids) the rest don't really grab me (and one - the Ysoki feel uncomfortably like someone saw rocket racoon and got very excited).

I'm also not sure yet if I'll need to add more of a universal feel to the game (e.g an overall foe, a sense of cosmic horror, the god-empress on her throne - that kind of thing) that exists in most of the far future settings I love.


IonutRO wrote:
As for how gods work, within a God's sphere its will is law (at least in 3.x)

I have run games in the Forgotten Realms in AD&D 2e, D&D 4e, D&D 5e and it looks like I'll be slipping some of it into Starfinder. How 3.x handles gods has about as much relevance to my game as the latest FR video game (not very much).

IonutRO wrote:
it's how Mystra forced everyone to use the weave when in other spheres magic worked without it.

Again, it depends on which edition you use as the basis on how the Weave works. The Weave is life and it arises as a result of the interconnectedness of life. Mystra isn't actually the god of magic and thus forces people to use the Weave. Mystra is the Weave. Also there do exist forms of magic on the Forgotten Realms that do not use the Weave.

Now you could point to a 3.x sourcebook I likely haven't read (most of my FR knowledge comes from AD&D 1e, AD&D 2e, 4e and 5e) and say I'm wrong. But falling back to the argument "but the book says so" is not a persuasive argument. As DM I get to change however little or much of the canon sourcebooks as I like. Although in this case, when magic was being used to rip the fabric of reality apart, I am choosing to say that the interdiction against technology was lessened or even removed.

IonutRO wrote:
What i mean to say is that Gods should actually have influence over their sphere of influence.

Yup, they do. Their influence begins and ends with their ability to grant spells and encourage their clergy to act in a certain way and to get society to put stock in the values of the god and church in question.

IonutRO wrote:
A God of tech should be able to dictate how tech works and doesn't within realms that it rules over as God of tech.

Gond dictates how tech works just fine. He's the god that is constantly trying to get new technology into the hands of mortals. (See: The printing press and broadsheets. A technological advancement that has nothing to do with magic).

Finally, how much influence did Mystra have over Toril while she was dead/when the Weave was disrupted? Not very much (see: The Spellplague, Fall of Netheril).

Furthermore, even if we accept that the gods are able to say "No" to technology. I would point out that in my post apocalyptic version of the Realms the place with the technology is a smoldering heap of ruins while the inhabited portions of Faerun have regressed to medieval times. I think the god of no technology is quite happy with the current state of affairs. Assuming he isn't dead (not an assumption anyone should make in my far future version of the Realms).


Mashallah wrote:

That houserule adds a ton of bookkeeping and effort into playing the game without any meaningful benefit out of it.

I think it's pointless and even counter-productive.
If static initiative is the problem, rerolling it is simpler than keeping track of all the types of dice.

Combat already takes 4hrs to complete. I like the idea but it is easier to just roll and spend more time making combat fun.


Mashallah wrote:
Fardragon wrote:
Fiction, even fantasy fiction, does not exist in isolation from the culture that spawned it.

Not everything has to be a perfect reflection of our society. It's fine if a fantasy culture has different values from our own.

Moreover, different fantasy cultures having different value is what makes them stand separate and be interesting.
Each fantasy society having different norms and values makes for a far richer and more interesting setting than everyone being the same.

If you create a fictional culture that has different values to the cultural norm, people are going think "why have they done it that that way" and draw - possibly quite erroneous - conclusions about the motives of the writer.

Consider Tolkien. Most people are quite happy to accept his male dominated world as reflecting the culture at the time of writing, and if you make a modern film you just beef up the female parts a bit. However, if The Hobbit where first published in 2017, do you not think it would be ripped apart for it's lack of female characters?

Also consider the Handmaid's Tale. It's quite clear that Atwood is not advocating the fictional society depicted. In fact it's obvious she is entirely opposed to it.

But that's the thing, you can't just say "it's fantasy" and expect people to just accept it. People are always going to ask "is the author pro or anti this?"


JetSetRadio wrote:
Mashallah wrote:

That houserule adds a ton of bookkeeping and effort into playing the game without any meaningful benefit out of it.

I think it's pointless and even counter-productive.
If static initiative is the problem, rerolling it is simpler than keeping track of all the types of dice.
Combat already takes 4hrs to complete. I like the idea but it is easier to just roll and spend more time making combat fun.

4 hours? I can't even imagine Pathfinder combat taking that long unless you have a Master Summoner or something in the party.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Society Subscriber
Mashallah wrote:
JetSetRadio wrote:
Mashallah wrote:

That houserule adds a ton of bookkeeping and effort into playing the game without any meaningful benefit out of it.

I think it's pointless and even counter-productive.
If static initiative is the problem, rerolling it is simpler than keeping track of all the types of dice.
Combat already takes 4hrs to complete. I like the idea but it is easier to just roll and spend more time making combat fun.
4 hours? I can't even imagine Pathfinder combat taking that long unless you have a Master Summoner or something in the party.

High level combat which is not ended by save or suck spells can run quite long :).

Though I think the longest we've had has been an hour or 2 for a single level combat at level 16 (4 PCs vs 10 enemies)


Damanta wrote:
Mashallah wrote:
JetSetRadio wrote:
Mashallah wrote:

That houserule adds a ton of bookkeeping and effort into playing the game without any meaningful benefit out of it.

I think it's pointless and even counter-productive.
If static initiative is the problem, rerolling it is simpler than keeping track of all the types of dice.
Combat already takes 4hrs to complete. I like the idea but it is easier to just roll and spend more time making combat fun.
4 hours? I can't even imagine Pathfinder combat taking that long unless you have a Master Summoner or something in the party.

High level combat which is not ended by save or suck spells can run quite long :).

Though I think the longest we've had has been an hour or 2 for a single level combat at level 16 (4 PCs vs 10 enemies)

I can easily see it lasting 1-2 hours, as I had such combats.

But I played at level 20, and I'm struggling to imagine a scenario where a combat lasts entire actual 4 hours, outside of the party getting an obscene amount of actions through means such as summoning lots and lots of pets or everyone taking Leadership.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Society Subscriber
Mashallah wrote:

I can easily see it lasting 1-2 hours, as I had such combats.

But I played at level 20, and I'm struggling to imagine a scenario where a combat lasts entire actual 4 hours, outside of the party getting an obscene amount of actions through means such as summoning lots and lots of pets or everyone taking Leadership.

I can only see that happening with players with analysis paralysis, or ill prepared summoning. Always make sure you know what you are going to do with your turn -_-

Then again, in my own group I see the occasional combat being dragged out because people don't know what to do (even when playing a weaponmaster fighter).


I will have abeir-toril exist solely to be bombarded by rocks fired by insectoid aliens from planets away.

With their foolish God refusing technology, it will be a blasted post apocalyptic landscape, kept safe only through the machinations of an overly powerful wizard, his goddess girlfriends, and a misguided drow who feels slaughtering evil orcs while complaining about his life is the best way to go about things.

It will be a magically powerful but otherwise backwards world, the living definition of the term "groundling".


Well yes, that's pretty much what happens when you deny the existence of the gun pointed at your face.


What happens when you try to Wish or Miracle it away? Or polymorph it into a squirt gun?


I haven't been reading much of the blogs, so I don't know how things will be, but based on my PF experiences, I plan to make the following changes:

If feat trees exist, I'll be removing those by having any feat in a tree be automatically gained as you go up levels. I hate feat trees. PCs will get a lot more feats as a result.

If the Big 6 are going to be required, I'll be removing that and using an automatic power increase to compensate. I want magic items, cybernetics, whatever to be something special for the PC, not a mandatory power increase to keep up with the CR, nor a requirement for a build.

If spells automatically increase in power as they level, I'll be removing that and require the actual higher level spell slot to be used to gain the increased power.

If those don't exist in Starfinder, then all the better. For everything else, I'll be waiting for my copy to arrive.


bookrat wrote:

I haven't been reading much of the blogs, so I don't know how things will be, but based on my PF experiences, I plan to make the following changes:

If feat trees exist, I'll be removing those by having any feat in a tree be automatically gained as you go up levels. I hate feat trees. PCs will get a lot more feats as a result.

If the Big 6 are going to be required, I'll be removing that and using an automatic power increase to compensate. I want magic items, cybernetics, whatever to be something special for the PC, not a mandatory power increase to keep up with the CR, nor a requirement for a build.

If spells automatically increase in power as they level, I'll be removing that and require the actual higher level spell slot to be used to gain the increased power.

If those don't exist in Starfinder, then all the better. For everything else, I'll be waiting for my copy to arrive.

You'll be happy to hear that a lot of your concerns have been addressed.

While feats with other feats as prerequisites still exist, they trees are much shorter, with a lot of the feat-taxes removed.

There is no Big 6 anymore. They've specifically pulled away from items and feats that give flat +X to stats, and while you can enchant, upgrade, cybernetically enhance, and tweak your gear, body, and armor all day long, you can only wear two magic items (things like Ring of Freedom of Movement, or Cloak of the Gargoyle. You can carry as many potions, spell gems, or wands as you like, though.)

Mark was pretty vague on automatic power-scaling of low level spells, but he mentioned that they'd specifically tried to not let low level spells scale into the ridiculousness that Pathfinder ones did quite often. Instead mentioning that spells are at their most powerful when you first get them.

Dark Archive

bookrat wrote:

I haven't been reading much of the blogs, so I don't know how things will be, but based on my PF experiences, I plan to make the following changes:

If feat trees exist, I'll be removing those by having any feat in a tree be automatically gained as you go up levels. I hate feat trees. PCs will get a lot more feats as a result.

If the Big 6 are going to be required, I'll be removing that and using an automatic power increase to compensate. I want magic items, cybernetics, whatever to be something special for the PC, not a mandatory power increase to keep up with the CR, nor a requirement for a build.

If spells automatically increase in power as they level, I'll be removing that and require the actual higher level spell slot to be used to gain the increased power.

If those don't exist in Starfinder, then all the better. For everything else, I'll be waiting for my copy to arrive.

Feat trees still exist but have been said to be much shorter. Most feats only have stat and BAB requirements, and maybe a single prereq feat.

I suspect the Big 6 are completely gone. We already have confirmation that weapons and armor no longer have numeric bonuses (only "cool" effects) and you get far more attribute increases over the course of your career. They have announced that you can purchase up to 3 different attribute enhancing upgrade with money (+2, +4, +6 each to a different stat), but they don't compete for "slots" with other items.

As for spells, that I can't tell you.


Nifty! I'm really excited about that.


Bjørn Røyrvik wrote:

I'm still very busy with Mystara so whether I have time is doubtful, but I was considering using it to run Dragonstar at some point in the future. I was hoping SF would be like like Dragonstar, which is basically just plug-and-play for 3.0 and has a fair amount of PF updates from fans.

Considering this seems unlikely and I already have a ton of cool settings I'm eager to run, like Spelljammer or more Dragonstar, I very much doubt I'll be running SF any time soon if at all.

Can you show me the links to Dragonstar updates?


I'm going to make our normal "One player with one character playing through a module designed for a party" adjustments to a PC. We have that pretty down for Pathfinder, so it shouldn't be too hard for SF.

Getting 3 third party books right away (RGG's Starfarer's Companion and the Planetarium and Tome of Aliens from Frog God). Planning to adapt and use any good ideas from them.

Other than those options, not much to begin with.


I'd make misslegrams the way most people communicate long distances.


Ventnor wrote:
I'd make misslegrams the way most people communicate long distances.

Ooh, can we do that thing where you text people who are just in the other room, but with missile-grams?


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I'm planning on having The Drift be a dimension where willpower can alter reality a la Gurren Lagann, though the effects don't usually persist when you exit The Drift. As a consequence, creatures don't normally stay in for very long to prevent Drift Dependence.

There are cults across known space that deliberately remain in The Drift for extended periods of time, weeks, months, or even years. Those who remain the longest no longer need to eat, sleep, drink, or breathe, but cannot survive outside The Drift, as their bodies have replaced such things as food or air with raw willpower.


technarken wrote:

I'm planning on having The Drift be a dimension where willpower can alter reality a la Gurren Lagann, though the effects don't usually persist when you exit The Drift. As a consequence, creatures don't normally stay in for very long to prevent Drift Dependence.

There are cults across known space that deliberately remain in The Drift for extended periods of time, weeks, months, or even years. Those who remain the longest no longer need to eat, sleep, drink, or breathe, but cannot survive outside The Drift, as their bodies have replaced such things as food or air with raw willpower.

There would be, of course, a cult that is attempting to accelerate the process of the drift consuming the material plane, so that everything becomes the drift.


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ROW ROW FIGHT THE POWAH

I might add Matt Mercer's rules for character deaths. Though maybe increase the amount of time that you have to resurrect them to a week. Depending on the state of the body. Maybe gentle repose to extend it longer? Sometimes you can be very far from home, and that adds drama too.


doc chaos wrote:
Bjørn Røyrvik wrote:

I'm still very busy with Mystara so whether I have time is doubtful, but I was considering using it to run Dragonstar at some point in the future. I was hoping SF would be like like Dragonstar, which is basically just plug-and-play for 3.0 and has a fair amount of PF updates from fans.

Considering this seems unlikely and I already have a ton of cool settings I'm eager to run, like Spelljammer or more Dragonstar, I very much doubt I'll be running SF any time soon if at all.
Can you show me the links to Dragonstar updates?

It was stuff from the mailing list, which is now dead, I believe. I fell out of it years ago and I think it's gone, along with most of the fan sites. I think I saved some of the stuff from the MS, so I'll see if I can dig it up.


Ventnor wrote:
technarken wrote:

I'm planning on having The Drift be a dimension where willpower can alter reality a la Gurren Lagann, though the effects don't usually persist when you exit The Drift. As a consequence, creatures don't normally stay in for very long to prevent Drift Dependence.

There are cults across known space that deliberately remain in The Drift for extended periods of time, weeks, months, or even years. Those who remain the longest no longer need to eat, sleep, drink, or breathe, but cannot survive outside The Drift, as their bodies have replaced such things as food or air with raw willpower.

There would be, of course, a cult that is attempting to accelerate the process of the drift consuming the material plane, so that everything becomes the drift.

I thought the Drift worked by eating into the various Great Beyond planes, that Drifts gone awry would lead to the spaceship suddenly fighting a denizen of Heaven or Hell?


Tectorman wrote:
Ventnor wrote:
technarken wrote:

I'm planning on having The Drift be a dimension where willpower can alter reality a la Gurren Lagann, though the effects don't usually persist when you exit The Drift. As a consequence, creatures don't normally stay in for very long to prevent Drift Dependence.

There are cults across known space that deliberately remain in The Drift for extended periods of time, weeks, months, or even years. Those who remain the longest no longer need to eat, sleep, drink, or breathe, but cannot survive outside The Drift, as their bodies have replaced such things as food or air with raw willpower.

There would be, of course, a cult that is attempting to accelerate the process of the drift consuming the material plane, so that everything becomes the drift.
I thought the Drift worked by eating into the various Great Beyond planes, that Drifts gone awry would lead to the spaceship suddenly fighting a denizen of Heaven or Hell?

Well, the cult would want to accelerate that process too.


Ventnor wrote:
Tectorman wrote:
Ventnor wrote:
technarken wrote:

I'm planning on having The Drift be a dimension where willpower can alter reality a la Gurren Lagann, though the effects don't usually persist when you exit The Drift. As a consequence, creatures don't normally stay in for very long to prevent Drift Dependence.

There are cults across known space that deliberately remain in The Drift for extended periods of time, weeks, months, or even years. Those who remain the longest no longer need to eat, sleep, drink, or breathe, but cannot survive outside The Drift, as their bodies have replaced such things as food or air with raw willpower.

There would be, of course, a cult that is attempting to accelerate the process of the drift consuming the material plane, so that everything becomes the drift.
I thought the Drift worked by eating into the various Great Beyond planes, that Drifts gone awry would lead to the spaceship suddenly fighting a denizen of Heaven or Hell?
Well, the cult would want to accelerate that process too.

It's a dimension where Triunites, Groetus Cultists, and Neo-Gorumites fight a ludicrously over the top war that basically everyone else tries hard to ignore.

Triunites want civilization to responsibly use The Drift to expand and homogenize, thus they oppose Groetus. Grouetus Cultists want everything subsumed into The Drift, which runs counter to Triunists Neo-Gorumites just enjoy the thrill of this relentlessly meritocratic darwinist paradise where sheer determination is law. They consider Triunites and Groetus Cultists to be worthy opponents that must be defeated to prove oneself to Gorum.

Despite this conflict, the majority of Drift-Space is as the book will describe it, partly due to the size of The Drift, partly due to Triunite intervention. There are, however, some worlds that are almost impossible to navigate to for most people because of warfare in the Drift-Space around their solar systems.

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