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Slaadish Chef wrote:

I didn't use to like spinach until I tried cooking it like greens, although when I make it (or greens) I usually toast some red pepper flakes in the oil before adding the garlic, and I double the amount of garlic*. I also like to sprinkle on little fresh grated parm or other sharp hard cheese right after I plate it.

I also discovered that I like adding some spinach (sauteed, then chilled and chopped) into the ricotta layers of my lasagna.

* Anytime I cook with garlic, I usually double or more the amount of garlic.

There's no such thing as "too much Garlic."


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Garlic shrimp and garlic mushroom taste great!


I like spinach in curry (saag paneer, i.e. greens and soft cheese, is lovely) and fladded to fried halloumi and cashew nuts.


I'll take the Garlic Mushrooms. I'm not too fond of shrimp.


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Pan wrote:
Asparagus is the one thing I simply cant tolerate.

Try it fresh, steamed, and smothered in hollandaise sauce. only way to eat it... Mostly 'cause the hollandaise is butter mayonnaise and therefore makes anything edible.


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I like green asparagus more than white ones.


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The Game Hamster wrote:
Pan wrote:
Asparagus is the one thing I simply cant tolerate.
Try it fresh, steamed, and smothered in hollandaise sauce. only way to eat it... Mostly 'cause the hollandaise is butter mayonnaise and therefore makes anything edible.

Butter makes everything better. :)


I've never had white asparagus. I can only imagine it is worse than regular asparagus. I can eat green asparagus if it's been wrapped in bacon and grilled (it's pretty good because bacon, like butter, makes everything better).


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Yes, it does. I add crumbled bacon to store-made potato salad, to make it special. :)

Sovereign Court

I dont know folks asparagus always smells like hot garbage both before and after you eat it yuck!


Slaadish Chef wrote:

I didn't use to like spinach until I tried cooking it like greens, although when I make it (or greens) I usually toast some red pepper flakes in the oil before adding the garlic, and I double the amount of garlic*. I also like to sprinkle on little fresh grated parm or other sharp hard cheese right after I plate it.

I also discovered that I like adding some spinach (sauteed, then chilled and chopped) into the ricotta layers of my lasagna.

* Anytime I cook with garlic, I usually double or more the amount of garlic.

Your lasagna recipe is one of two ways people have gotten me to eat spinach.

Re: Asparagus. I like it grilled or steamed. Our patch is dying out and needs a replanting, we haven't taken good care of it. I've never had white asparagus; ours is green or red/purple (like the cabbage).


White Asparagus is Asparagus that has been deprived of the required amount of Sunlight. All the Chlorophyll disappears, leaving a "bleached" appearance.


Lathiira wrote:
Slaadish Chef wrote:

I didn't use to like spinach until I tried cooking it like greens, although when I make it (or greens) I usually toast some red pepper flakes in the oil before adding the garlic, and I double the amount of garlic*. I also like to sprinkle on little fresh grated parm or other sharp hard cheese right after I plate it.

I also discovered that I like adding some spinach (sauteed, then chilled and chopped) into the ricotta layers of my lasagna.

* Anytime I cook with garlic, I usually double or more the amount of garlic.

Your lasagna recipe is one of two ways people have gotten me to eat spinach.

Re: Asparagus. I like it grilled or steamed. Our patch is dying out and needs a replanting, we haven't taken good care of it. I've never had white asparagus; ours is green or red/purple (like the cabbage).

Before you re-plant, you might want to check the soil conditions. The patch dying out might be a symptom of depleted soil.


John Napier 698 wrote:
Lathiira wrote:
Slaadish Chef wrote:

I didn't use to like spinach until I tried cooking it like greens, although when I make it (or greens) I usually toast some red pepper flakes in the oil before adding the garlic, and I double the amount of garlic*. I also like to sprinkle on little fresh grated parm or other sharp hard cheese right after I plate it.

I also discovered that I like adding some spinach (sauteed, then chilled and chopped) into the ricotta layers of my lasagna.

* Anytime I cook with garlic, I usually double or more the amount of garlic.

Your lasagna recipe is one of two ways people have gotten me to eat spinach.

Re: Asparagus. I like it grilled or steamed. Our patch is dying out and needs a replanting, we haven't taken good care of it. I've never had white asparagus; ours is green or red/purple (like the cabbage).

Before you re-plant, you might want to check the soil conditions. The patch dying out might be a symptom of depleted soil.

On that front, I've heard that asparagus does well in salty soil... Strange, but apparently true... might help keep the weeds out a bit, to make upkeep easier.


Not salty soil where I'm at. Matapeake silt loams. Old patch, not taken care of properly, the grass in the yard and some weeds have invaded. Hard to tell where the yard ends and the patch begins now. Losing out to competition, not soil depletion I think. Though I suppose we could always till that compost heap of mine in for good measure!


Lathiira wrote:
Not salty soil where I'm at. Matapeake silt loams. Old patch, not taken care of properly, the grass in the yard and some weeds have invaded. Hard to tell where the yard ends and the patch begins now. Losing out to competition, not soil depletion I think. Though I suppose we could always till that compost heap of mine in for good measure!

Good. Mix the compost with as much topsoil as you can from the patch, then lay it back down before you plant the seeds.


This thread is so varied.


It's what makes it so interesting.


We mostly talk about food.
Spinach lasagna is definitely my favorite one (again, with ricotta cheese, that is perfect for spinach).
But as Dalindra doesn't like spinach I often bake mousaka, bolognaise moussaka or chicken mushroom moussaka instead of lasagna.


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Last summer I started making my own bacon. I highly recommend it. It's is so simple, that once you do it, you'll wonder why so few people do it. I've grown to really like some intense aromatics in my cures, but as long as you don't use them and stick to old standards (brown sugar, maple syrup, bourbon, etc) you can do it in your fridge without a lot of fuss. You can then finish it in the oven, grill or smoker as you choose.

The first time I made my own bacon I made multiple mistakes and it was still the second best bacon I had ever had. It's extremely forgiving.


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Irontruth wrote:

Last summer I started making my own bacon. I highly recommend it. It's is so simple, that once you do it, you'll wonder why so few people do it. I've grown to really like some intense aromatics in my cures, but as long as you don't use them and stick to old standards (brown sugar, maple syrup, bourbon, etc) you can do it in your fridge without a lot of fuss. You can then finish it in the oven, grill or smoker as you choose.

The first time I made my own bacon I made multiple mistakes and it was still the second best bacon I had ever had. It's extremely forgiving.

You intrigue me sir tell me more of this bacon of witch you speak.


Here where I live (not in my town as it is a urban place, but not more than 10 minutes away) many people has pigs and it's very common that they make all kind of smoked/dried/salted products with the pig.
Bacon, salted pig, chorizo and similar products, even there are some products made with the bones. Also let the grease of the pork turn rancid and then use it for cooking is a thing.
It's almost a party here in late autumn when the pigs are killed and the different parts used for different products. I've known people that kills 8 pigs in a weekend. I don't know a lot of this tradition as I don't have a family in rural towns but most people here has and it's surprising to me that it's such a relevant event.
It is a common saying here that everything from the pig is used for something. And it is true. Even the skin can be deep fried and eaten as a snack.

I'm not too fond of many pork products but the variety is amazing.

And I usually have some homemade products of this kind. Mostly chorizo.


Deep fried Pork Rinds are eaten over here as well. They're put in plastic bags and are sold as snacks. Is there a Spanish equivalent to the Italian Cappacola (salted, cured ham)?


Rancid pork grease i'm putting that just below pork brain on my list of pig products I will have nothing to do with.


Same here. But I don't know if it was common elsewere.
Also the «morcilla» is a weird thing. It is mostly made of blood. And it's disturbingly tasty (even if I'm not too fond of that kind of food).
The liver with onion it's also great. I got a bit tired of eating it when I had anemia but I like it.


The weirdest thing in my area pork wise that I don't understand is pickled pig feet. I'm not even sure how one eats a hoof.


Vidmaster7 wrote:
Rancid pork grease i'm putting that just below pork brain on my list of pig products I will have nothing to do with.

It's used as a complement more than an ingredient itself. It was used traditionally as a replacement for butter or oil for cooking (oil is produced at the South and East, but the weather is not appropriate here for growing olives)-and it's less used nowadays.

Still used in some traditional stews.
I hate it.


Vidmaster7 wrote:
The weirdest thing in my area pork wise that I don't understand is pickled pig feet. I'm not even sure how one eats a hoof.

Here they are called «manitas de cerdo» (little pork hands) and they are eaten too stewed.

Making stews with the bones is also great. It's not eaten but it adds some flavor. And the bone maw is eaten too.
Also the guts amd the tail are stewed in different recipes. And the head (without the brain) is salt dried to eat.
Everything is used. Everything.


In my head I can respect that but my stomach says nay.


Ham with beans is big over here. You would slow cook some Ham while still on the bone with Pinto Beans, Onions, Carrots, and Celery. Every once in a while, add a bit of water to keep the beans from drying out.


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What is that ham you talk about, sir?
The only ham that I know is cured ham.

Just kidding. I like cooked ham too. It's just not common here. We usually use the shoulder instead of the back leg for that kind of things as the leg is used for making cured ham.
I've eaten slow cooked ham too and I really liked it. Better than the shoulder.

Chicken peas with cured (and then cooked) ham is a delicious recipe too. Just some olive oil, white wine, garlic, ham and chicken peas, and you have a simple meal that tastes great.


I'll have to try that as well.


I tried them with cooked ham and it's fine but not the same. The slightly salted flavor the cured ham adds is what makes the difference. I usually add some slow cooked onion too, and you can add some tomato or tomato sauce too (as the tomato sauce I make already has onion in it, when I use tomato sauce I don't add any onion).

I have to try that recipe for pinto beans with ham because it sounds delicious.
Even if white beans are the most common here pinto beans are my favorite ones. They are more consistent.


It is actually rather bland. Season to taste. And some good bread helps, too.


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Good bread helps always. It solves most problems in life. Everything is less serious with good bread.


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By the way. With the beans and Ham, add as much garlic as you want.


Kileanna wrote:


It is a common saying here that everything from the pig is used for something. And it is true. Even the skin can be deep fried and eaten as a snack.
.

We have that in the UK, too - we call them pork scratchings, and it's a popular snack to have in the pub. Pig's trotters are also a thing, though you very seldom see them, as is a sort of sausage made from coagulated pig's blood, which we call black pudding.


What you call scratchings we call cracklings. As a kid, it was often my job to stir the chunks of skin and fat in a large black iron cauldron we kept for just such a thing. I'd love some fresh cracklings about now.. lol


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We turned them into doggie chews.


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I never understood Pickled Pig's Feet myself.


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They are feet. They come from a pig. They are pickled.

You're welcome.


Vidmaster7 wrote:
Irontruth wrote:

Last summer I started making my own bacon. I highly recommend it. It's is so simple, that once you do it, you'll wonder why so few people do it. I've grown to really like some intense aromatics in my cures, but as long as you don't use them and stick to old standards (brown sugar, maple syrup, bourbon, etc) you can do it in your fridge without a lot of fuss. You can then finish it in the oven, grill or smoker as you choose.

The first time I made my own bacon I made multiple mistakes and it was still the second best bacon I had ever had. It's extremely forgiving.

You intrigue me sir tell me more of this bacon of witch you speak.

What do you want to know? It is by far the easiest cured meat to make yourself. Pretty much idiot proof.


captain yesterday wrote:
I never understood Pickled Pig's Feet myself.

My dad loved them. He'd buy a jar of them and eat nearly the whole thing at once. I could never bring myself to try them, however.


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I made jerky at home for the first time last month. It was remarkably easy.

Thin sliced top round, soaked for seven hours in 1/2 Worcestershire 1/2 soy seasoned with black pepper and garlic.

Laid on baking racks in a 250° Fahrenheit oven for four and a half hours. Crack the door every could hours to let moisture out.


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Oops, every couple hours. Literally noticed one minute too late to fix. :P


That's okay. We know what you meant.


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John Napier 698 wrote:
Lathiira wrote:
Not salty soil where I'm at. Matapeake silt loams. Old patch, not taken care of properly, the grass in the yard and some weeds have invaded. Hard to tell where the yard ends and the patch begins now. Losing out to competition, not soil depletion I think. Though I suppose we could always till that compost heap of mine in for good measure!
Good. Mix the compost with as much topsoil as you can from the patch, then lay it back down before you plant the seeds.

Yeah, compost is great for that, and adding a bit of manure would never hurt either. The point of the salt is to keep out unwanted plants as most plants can't handle very much salt, but apparently, as long as you don't go overboard, asparagus will handle it just fine.

Reminds me of pumpkins, which, surprisingly, handle acidic soil just fine.
Found that out after we had 15 volunteer pumpkin plants growing in the pine-tree grove/ditch thing by our house after tossing rotten pumpkins there thinking that the needles would keep them from growing... yeah... no. Our best year with pumpkin growing was the one year we weren't trying to grow pumpkins at all.


Irontruth wrote:
Vidmaster7 wrote:
Irontruth wrote:

Last summer I started making my own bacon. I highly recommend it. It's is so simple, that once you do it, you'll wonder why so few people do it. I've grown to really like some intense aromatics in my cures, but as long as you don't use them and stick to old standards (brown sugar, maple syrup, bourbon, etc) you can do it in your fridge without a lot of fuss. You can then finish it in the oven, grill or smoker as you choose.

The first time I made my own bacon I made multiple mistakes and it was still the second best bacon I had ever had. It's extremely forgiving.

You intrigue me sir tell me more of this bacon of witch you speak.
What do you want to know? It is by far the easiest cured meat to make yourself. Pretty much idiot proof.

That is good to know I will have to try it.


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On the topic of recipes (and Lovecraft, oddly):

A program trained to combine parts of recipes is fed Lovecraft.

The follow-up, where the program begins with Lovecraft and is given recipes to interpret.

My greatest hope in the culinary pursuits is that someone will one day describe my cooking with Lovecraftian prose.


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Having a tradition of cooking anything that is slimy, has tentacles and comes from the sea, or alternatively has a lot of legs, a carapace and comes from the sea, Galician cooking is a good candidate for being described in a Lovecraftian prose.

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