Came here to say this.


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With sheep blood and antibiotics, it seems xD


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Sissyl wrote:
What does a petri dish taste like?

I'm thinking it has a lot of minerals.


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Sissyl wrote:
What does a petri dish taste like? Is it best enjoyed fried, grilled, boiled or sauteed? With wine, beer, or ketchup?

Possibly more digestible than a satellite dish.

And I bet there's a new super hipstah restaurant somewhere that serves food in lab equipment (I remember going somewhere that served cocktails in test tubes and similar. It was dreadful).


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Sissyl wrote:
What does a petri dish taste like?

{ponders nibbling on Laura Petrie}


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Limeylongears wrote:
Sissyl wrote:
What does a petri dish taste like? Is it best enjoyed fried, grilled, boiled or sauteed? With wine, beer, or ketchup?

Possibly more digestible than a satellite dish.

And I bet there's a new super hipstah restaurant somewhere that serves food in lab equipment (I remember going somewhere that served cocktails in test tubes and similar. It was dreadful).

That sounds like something cool unless you have worked with that kind of equipment.

I'm not sure how my mind would react to a beer served in the same tube we get urine samples. The resemblance could be disturbing.


Apple juice.


Pillbug Toenibbler wrote:
Sissyl wrote:
What does a petri dish taste like?
{ponders nibbling on Laura Petrie}

{Considers Flinders Petrie for Afters}

Get a tomb like mine and you'll never be short of free-range archeologists. Best 5,000,0000 gp I ever spent, I swear.


Kileanna wrote:
Limeylongears wrote:
Sissyl wrote:
What does a petri dish taste like? Is it best enjoyed fried, grilled, boiled or sauteed? With wine, beer, or ketchup?

Possibly more digestible than a satellite dish.

And I bet there's a new super hipstah restaurant somewhere that serves food in lab equipment (I remember going somewhere that served cocktails in test tubes and similar. It was dreadful).

That sounds like something cool unless you have worked with that kind of equipment.

I'm not sure how my mind would react to a beer served in the same tube we get urine samples. The resemblance could be disturbing.

Cider.


I've seen wine colored urines... not white wine, but red wine. Yucks.


All this talk about clever glassware and hipster outfits has me thinking about those lunatic cat people who love cats so much they make cakes in litter boxes with poop scoops for serving. /puke


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Yucks.

We should get back to the real food talk. It's getting scatologic.

Today I baked a strawberry and cream spongecake.

And cooked homemade burgers.

And had a free day at job so I'll avoid talking about human samples again. For the greater Good of this thread ;-D


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I made chicken tacos last night; always a big hit with the family.


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I will be making a teriyaki udon and steak stir-fry for dinner.

My main issue with cooking is that currently I cook only for myself, and I am only 19 (soon to be twenty), so I can't buy cooking wine. :/ I've used cooking wine all my life, and I feel that it greatly improves the flavor of most dishes that I make with it.

Which is why I like the store-bought teriyaki stuff, as it has some wine in it, and I can buy it while still underaged, thus improving my eastern-style cooking... It still doesn't replace good cooking sherry though...


Orville Redenbacher wrote:
All this talk about clever glassware and hipster outfits has me thinking about those lunatic cat people who love cats so much they make cakes in litter boxes with poop scoops for serving. /puke

My sister did that for a co-worker on her birthday who is easily embarrassed. Turned the poor woman beet red. My sister likes cats, but she did it because she's solidly NE.

Spoiler:
She also made a butt-shaped birthday cake for my brother, with a light peach-colored frosting and a strategically-placed Baby Ruth candy bar. Neutral. Evil.


The Game Hamster wrote:

I will be making a teriyaki udon and steak stir-fry for dinner.

My main issue with cooking is that currently I cook only for myself, and I am only 19 (soon to be twenty), so I can't buy cooking wine. :/ I've used cooking wine all my life, and I feel that it greatly improves the flavor of most dishes that I make with it.

Which is why I like the store-bought teriyaki stuff, as it has some wine in it, and I can buy it while still underaged, thus improving my eastern-style cooking... It still doesn't replace good cooking sherry though...

I don't usually drink, but I love using alcoholic drinks when cooking: wine, beer, brandy, rum...

They add a great taste to food.

Here in Spain you only have to be 18 to buy alcohol, 16 a few years ago when I was that age. But never had a problem buying it before then nobody asked for your ID Card and I looked older.


The Game Hamster wrote:

I will be making a teriyaki udon and steak stir-fry for dinner.

My main issue with cooking is that currently I cook only for myself, and I am only 19 (soon to be twenty), so I can't buy cooking wine. :/ I've used cooking wine all my life, and I feel that it greatly improves the flavor of most dishes that I make with it.

Which is why I like the store-bought teriyaki stuff, as it has some wine in it, and I can buy it while still underaged, thus improving my eastern-style cooking... It still doesn't replace good cooking sherry though...

Most places actually classify cooking wine as a baking ingredient and not an alcoholic beverage. Even in most dry counties in the US, you can still buy cooking wine.

If you're mostly cooking Asian food, I'd try going to a small mom-and-pop Asian food market. Put a bottle of Chinese sherry in your basket and if they card you, apologize and say you didn't know.

Conversely, you can just substitute chicken or beef stock, depending on the dish. Or one of my favorites, water and miso paste. Miso is fermented, so it has a lot of those complex flavors like you find in alcohol. It also keeps well in the fridge, once you open the container it's fine for a couple weeks.


I agree. The difference between supermarket cooking wines and drinking wines is that the cooking wines have salt added. The last time I bought cooking wine, I was not required to show my ID.


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In the Midwest they don't classify alcohol as for cooking.

In fact, I'm pretty sure there's only two classifications; Beer, and Not Beer.


Cooking wines don't actually need alcohol. Mostly you'd just boil it off anyways.


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Perhaps the non-alcoholic "wines" on the store shelves would work just as well. Where I live, they're in the same section as the non-alcoholic "beers."


I'm old enough to remember the first widely distributed non-alchoholic beer. It was called "Near Beer" and you could buy it in soda machines.


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I never use cooking wines as they are often really low quality. At least here you can buy a decent drinking wine for about the same price or just a bit more and the difference on the quality is big.

Alcohol is good for cooking because it heats and burns. The result of cooking with alcohol free drinks is not the same.

By the way, Coke is also great for some dishes. I really like Chicken with coke.


Baking a ham with Coke poured over it is really good, too. That's how my later mother in law did it, and my son insisted that after she passed away that we continue doing this whenever his mother or I baked one. But you can't use pineapple or cloves with it. They don't mix well with the Coke.


captain yesterday wrote:

In the Midwest they don't classify alcohol as for cooking.

In fact, I'm pretty sure there's only two classifications; Beer, and Not Beer.

In Minnesota (until July 1), you can't buy alcohol on Sundays. You can still buy cooking wine.


Kileanna wrote:

I never use cooking wines as they are often really low quality. At least here you can buy a decent drinking wine for about the same price or just a bit more and the difference on the quality is big.

Alcohol is good for cooking because it heats and burns. The result of cooking with alcohol free drinks is not the same.

By the way, Coke is also great for some dishes. I really like Chicken with coke.

I also prefer using drinking wine for my cooking, the one exception being Chinese food, I still use the Chinese version of sherry, which I would never drink, but it imparts the correct flavors to the sauces.


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Kileanna wrote:

I never use cooking wines as they are often really low quality. At least here you can buy a decent drinking wine for about the same price or just a bit more and the difference on the quality is big.

Alcohol is good for cooking because it heats and burns. The result of cooking with alcohol free drinks is not the same.

By the way, Coke is also great for some dishes. I really like Chicken with coke.

I wasn't going to say anything, but if my brother, the cook, had seen the posts about using "cooking wine," he'd have been soooo judgy.


DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I'm old enough to remember the first widely distributed non-alchoholic beer. It was called "Near Beer" and you could buy it in soda machines.

O'Douls was the first variety I recall seeing, back when my step grandfather's doctor told him he needed to cut down on his drinking before surgery.


You can still get O'Douls here in the States. One of the pizza/bar chains offers it. Fortunately, it's not (too) horrible and I can have one with pizza if I want. I can't really drink anymore because of all the meds I have to take so I'll settle for something close to beer once in awhile.


Irontruth wrote:
The Game Hamster wrote:

I will be making a teriyaki udon and steak stir-fry for dinner.

My main issue with cooking is that currently I cook only for myself, and I am only 19 (soon to be twenty), so I can't buy cooking wine. :/ I've used cooking wine all my life, and I feel that it greatly improves the flavor of most dishes that I make with it.

Which is why I like the store-bought teriyaki stuff, as it has some wine in it, and I can buy it while still underaged, thus improving my eastern-style cooking... It still doesn't replace good cooking sherry though...

Most places actually classify cooking wine as a baking ingredient and not an alcoholic beverage. Even in most dry counties in the US, you can still buy cooking wine.

If you're mostly cooking Asian food, I'd try going to a small mom-and-pop Asian food market. Put a bottle of Chinese sherry in your basket and if they card you, apologize and say you didn't know.

Conversely, you can just substitute chicken or beef stock, depending on the dish. Or one of my favorites, water and miso paste. Miso is fermented, so it has a lot of those complex flavors like you find in alcohol. It also keeps well in the fridge, once you open the container it's fine for a couple weeks.

Must just be Ohio or something. Also, dorm rules wouldn't let me have cooking wine right now if I could buy it anyway...


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Sissyl wrote:
Cooking wines don't actually need alcohol. Mostly you'd just boil it off anyways.

For flavor, no. But if you're trying to deglaze a pan/pot to unstick the fond (the caramelized/browned bits) so they'll incorporate into your gravy or sauce, an alcoholic liquid seems to work better than a non-alcoholic one.

If you're naturally overanxious and uptight like myself, I find a bit of alcohol also helps loosen up me too.


I use wine for deglazing a lot, and it has definitely to be alcoholic to do it right.

Also, my cooking teacher will set on fire anybody who dared to call cooking wine a wine. He was adamant about never using it. He was a famed chef with a lot of oddities but also a good teacher and better cook.

Also, people is very picky with wine here, as there are many options, some of them high quality and cheap at the same time, so no excuse but lack of knowledge or lazyness for using a low quality wine. Spain is a land of wine.


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for me, "regular" wine used for cooking is a bit too sweet... I prefer my flavors to lean a bit more to the bitter side.

It might just be me, but, "regular" wine is better used for desserts...
(one of my faves is pears poached in red wine with cinnamon sticks and sugar, then served with [quality] vanilla ice cream.)


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Well, it depends on what variety of wine you're using. Each wine goes with a different kind of food.
I often use Albariño (a local variety of white wine) for cooking and it adds a very good sour taste to seafood, mushrooms, etc.
As a red wine a Mencia is usually a good variety for cooking, very soft with a fruity taste. It makes great beef stews and a delicious Bolognaise too.
But I don't know a lot about what varieties of wine are avaliable there for a good price.
All young wines with a soft and slightly sour taste can do fine.


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Ham hock was cheap at the supermarket, so today I made Hoppin' John

It wasn't that great, but I think I left it to cook for too long.


Yummy!


I love good Hoppin' John. Throw a little Tabasco or Louisiana Hot Sauce on that stuff and that's some good eatin' right there.


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No, Hoppin' John needs hot pepper vinegar. Trappey's if you've got it


Limeylongears wrote:

Ham hock was cheap at the supermarket, so today I made Hoppin' John

It wasn't that great, but I think I left it to cook for too long.

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There is nothing in the world I hate eating more than peas.


captain yesterday wrote:
There is nothing in the world I hate eating more than peas.

I'll take your peas, if in exchange you take my spinach.


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Only if it's raw, I don't eat cooked spinach. But it's great for sandwiches and salads.

Broccoli is great no matter how you prepare it.


captain yesterday wrote:

Only if it's raw, I don't eat cooked spinach. But it's great for sandwiches and salads.

Broccoli is great no matter how you prepare it.

Fine by me. I will once in a while eat it cooked if rarely.

And yes, broccoli (and cauliflower, the albino broccoli) are awesome however they are cooked.


I take your spinach, your peas, your broccoli, cauliflower and whatever vegetable you want. I like all of them.
I don't like cabbage a lot but it's great for spring rolls.

Cauliflower is great baked with ham with white sauce and cheese!


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I prefer cabbage as cole slaw. Once in a while, boiled with potatoes and ham. If the captain doesn't want my cooked spinach, it's yours!


CrystalSeas wrote:
No, Hoppin' John needs hot pepper vinegar. Trappey's if you've got it

Never heard of it, but I'll look for it!


I love me some german red cabbage.


I love cole slaw and sauerkraut, especially with Polish kielbasa in the latter. Not a fan of Bavarian sauerkraut, though. It seems to be too sweet.

As far as spinach goes, I prefer it raw in salads and on sandwiches. The only type of greens I really like are turnip greens with pepper sauce dribbled over them. Pepper sauce is really good on black eyed peas, too.

I grew up on a farm and we made a vegetable garden (a fairly large one) every year. I didn't really appreciate a lot of the work that went into it (I didn't like working in the garden that much), and didn't care for a lot of vegetables at all, to be honest. But I learned to appreciate them in college when my mom and my roommate's mother would send us fresh vegetables. That was the first time I ever tried sauerkraut, and I was surprised at how much I liked it. Since then I've decided to at least try nearly any dish set before me, though I still don't think I could eat insects or arachnids.


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I didn't use to like spinach until I tried cooking it like greens, although when I make it (or greens) I usually toast some red pepper flakes in the oil before adding the garlic, and I double the amount of garlic*. I also like to sprinkle on little fresh grated parm or other sharp hard cheese right after I plate it.

I also discovered that I like adding some spinach (sauteed, then chilled and chopped) into the ricotta layers of my lasagna.

* Anytime I cook with garlic, I usually double or more the amount of garlic.

Sovereign Court

Asparagus is the one thing I simply cant tolerate.


I don't care much for it, either. If it's grilled I can handle it. Raw or steamed, not so much.

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