Purify Food and Drink on Stale Bread


Rules Questions


Would Purify Food and Drink turn stale bread back to edible bread?

Liberty's Edge

Quote:
This spell makes spoiled, rotten, diseased, poisonous, or otherwise contaminated food and water pure and suitable for eating and drinking. This spell does not prevent subsequent natural decay or spoilage. Unholy water and similar food and drink of significance is spoiled by purify food and drink, but the spell has no effect on creatures of any type nor upon magic potions. Water weighs about 8 pounds per gallon. One cubic foot of water contains roughly 8 gallons and weighs about 60 pounds.

Stale bread is edible. Staleness is usually the result of the fat/oils within bread becoming inert and fully solid again (hence why warming it up brings it back to life somewhat).

Moldy bread, on the other hand, would be a valid use for this spell since mold is clearly a contaminant.


Purify food and drink wrote:
This spell makes spoiled, rotten, diseased, poisonous, or otherwise contaminated food and water pure and suitable for eating and drinking.

It is in the eye of the beholder. A highborne wizard who can't sleep on a pea obviously considers stale bread to be inedible.


If you are going by personal preference does that mean it changes how well cooked things are and the temperature? If so whose preferences are used? Personally I think beef that is cooked beyond medium rare is ruined, but my sister won’t touch it if there is the slightest trace of pink. I also prefer my food hot, but my in-laws generally serve food I consider cold.

I think the spell simply makes the food and drink safe to heat. It does not reheat coffee, or change stale bread. It does not change well done meat to medium rare, or warm up vegetables. It does not make bad cooking taste better unless the food was actually truly inedible.


Quote:
Personally I think beef that is cooked beyond medium rare is ruined, but my sister won’t touch it if there is the slightest trace of pink.

Your sister is a vile fiend. Anyone that eats their steak "well done" is a vile fiend. Steak was meant to be eaten either rare or medium rare, and anyone that says otherwise must be slapped with the ashen steaks they so crave.

...

I think my honest answer to the OP's question would be a mixture of Blymurkla's statement and "expect table variance." Personally, I'd allow it. You're making stale bread more palatable at the least. Sounds like something wizards would do whenever they have to cook their own food after firing their servants over something silly.


This might help, my street angel character used it along with Purify wrote:


PFS Legal Prestidigitation
Source PRPG Core Rulebook pg. 325 (Amazon)
School universal; Level arcanist 0, bard 0, magus 0, medium 0, mesmerist 0, psychic 0, skald 0, sorcerer/wizard 0
Casting
Casting Time 1 standard action
Components V, S
Effect
Range 10 ft.
Target, Effect, or Area see text
Duration 1 hour
Saving Throw see text; Spell Resistance no
Description
Prestidigitations are minor tricks that novice spellcasters use for practice. Once cast, a prestidigitation spell enables you to perform simple magical effects for 1 hour. The effects are minor and have severe limitations. A prestidigitation can slowly lift 1 pound of material. It can color, clean, or soil items in a 1-foot cube each round. It can chill, warm, or flavor 1 pound of nonliving material. It cannot deal damage or affect the concentration of spellcasters. Prestidigitation can create small objects, but they look crude and artificial. The materials created by a prestidigitation spell are extremely fragile, and they cannot be used as tools, weapons, or spell components. Finally, prestidigitation lacks the power to duplicate any other spell effects. Any actual change to an object (beyond just moving, cleaning, or soiling it) persists only 1 hour.


Funny thing, maybe you just have to spoil the stale bread a bit more just to make it unedible so you are able to cast Purify Food and Drink to make it fresh again?

Personally, I'd allow it to be used on edible things that no longer are in their best moments but they are still edible to be fresh again. But not on badly cooked food, like too much salt, charred, etc.


Daw wrote:
This might help, my street angel character used it along with Purify wrote:


PFS Legal Prestidigitation
Source PRPG Core Rulebook pg. 325 (Amazon)
School universal; Level arcanist 0, bard 0, magus 0, medium 0, mesmerist 0, psychic 0, skald 0, sorcerer/wizard 0
Casting
Casting Time 1 standard action
Components V, S
Effect
Range 10 ft.
Target, Effect, or Area see text
Duration 1 hour
Saving Throw see text; Spell Resistance no
Description
Prestidigitations are minor tricks that novice spellcasters use for practice. Once cast, a prestidigitation spell enables you to perform simple magical effects for 1 hour. The effects are minor and have severe limitations. A prestidigitation can slowly lift 1 pound of material. It can color, clean, or soil items in a 1-foot cube each round. It can chill, warm, or flavor 1 pound of nonliving material. It cannot deal damage or affect the concentration of spellcasters. Prestidigitation can create small objects, but they look crude and artificial. The materials created by a prestidigitation spell are extremely fragile, and they cannot be used as tools, weapons, or spell components. Finally, prestidigitation lacks the power to duplicate any other spell effects. Any actual change to an object (beyond just moving, cleaning, or soiling it) persists only 1 hour.

I'm playing a Shaman so I won't get prestidigitation. This question is more for backstory flavor than in game mechanics. The idea was basically to recreate Pushing Daisies where my character would acquire spoiled produce and other such things on the cheap, purify them and then sell them to customers. I was wondering how far he could push this within the rules and if the cantrip would allow him to keep food completely fresh or if it would get stale/flavorless and the cantrip would just make it safe to eat.


You could go real deep and have it be what the deity thinks is preferred. well cayden likes his medium rare, asmodeus prefers his well done. seranae might turn it into a salad, Gorum turns it into a Cow (super raw) Rovagog turns into into a baby (probably of your race).


Gallant Armor wrote:
I'm playing a Shaman so I won't get prestidigitation.

Two-world magic solves this problem for the low, low cost of a trait.


Gallant Armor wrote:
I'm playing a Shaman so I won't get prestidigitation. This question is more for backstory flavor than in game mechanics. The idea was basically to recreate Pushing Daisies where my character would acquire spoiled produce and other such things on the cheap, purify them and then sell them to customers. I was wondering how far he could push this within the rules and if the cantrip would allow him to keep food completely fresh or if it would get stale/flavorless and the cantrip would just make it safe to eat.

Obviously, you can't push this so far that your character stays a food-purifier for her entire life and never becomes an adventurer.

The reasoning behind my answer, that it's in the eye of the beholder, is that it's fun. Using a cantrip to purify not-exactly-inedible food is in no way gamebreaking. But that scene where the picky, snobbish magic user can use Purify food and drink on a piece of stale bread while the undemanding, outdoorsy magic user can't is to good to prevent with a rules-argument.

The Exchange Owner - D20 Hobbies

Nasty tasting safe to eat stale bread, yes.


graystone wrote:
Gallant Armor wrote:
I'm playing a Shaman so I won't get prestidigitation.
Two-world magic solves this problem for the low, low cost of a trait.

That's a good tip. I'm already maxed out on traits, but I may be able to swap it for something.


Do you have any idea how many recipes require the bread to be stale by the way?


It absorbs more liquid if it's stale and recipes are much better.
In Spain we have Torrijas, which are great with stale bread. Bread pudding is also great.

Now I'm hungry.

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2011 Top 32

Heck, you could cast purify food and drink on raw chicken and the result would be absolutely safe to eat raw chicken. Yum?

I don't think it would freshen up stale bread - the spell doesn't make things more palatable, it just removes toxins, germs, and mold. Just because you can now safely eat the remains of the zombie cow your party just killed doesn't mean they are going to taste any good.


I've always wondered if this spell turns wine into grape juice. Is alcohol considerated toxic? Because even if the toxic effects of alcohol can be desirable it is still toxic.
Also I'd rather not use it on my blue cheese just in case it removes the tasty mold from it xD


I feel like that would make for a very angry Cayden follower


In my games I always rule that alcohol is purified even though I don't know if it is by RAW so in S&S my players avoid casting it on their rum.


I would think alcohol counts as a toxin.


It should by logic. But, as sometimes rules seem to be counterintuitive to me, I'd rather not make assumptions.


I think quantity counts as to whether something is a toxin. For example, lots of "nutritional supplements" and "homeopathy" are based on magic. The FDA allows them to make bogus claim provided that no one would seriously take them as truth and that the substances used do not actually cause harm. Except people decide that if a little is claimed to be good, then more would be better, and then you get people getting sick form 30 cups of herbal whatever in a day.


I suspect it might depend on what god the caster worships (or where they get their power from if not a cleric). A god of purity or one who teaches restraint from physical pleasure would turn your wine to water when you purify it. A god of alcohol or carnal pleasure might 'purify' your water into alcohol instead.

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