RIP: Buying computer games in stores - what now?


Video Games

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Scarab Sages

Dominus.

Warcraft (who else remembers the fantastic double-sided faux-leather manual?).

Dark Legions.

The Neverhood.

Chronomaster.

Lords of Magic.

Warlords: Battlecry.

Warbreeds.

Obsidian.

Diablo II.

Disciples: Sacred Lands.

Baldur's Gate.

Arcanum: Of Steamworks and Magick Obscura.

Neverwinter Nights.

These are just a few of the computer games I found out about only by browsing the computer games aisle of the electronics store and seeing all the cool boxes with their spiels and detailed manuals.

Apparently, however, that paradigm no longer exists - if you want a new computer game, you evidently MUST download it from one of a few websites, where the closest thing to a box describing what's in it is a long compilation of other people's editorials. I've been to Steampowered.com - I can scarcely tell what I'm looking at. It's both too much and too little.

My question: If I can't browse boxes in a store, how do I discover entirely new computer games in this crummy new world without having to get irrelevant armchair-critics and the Internet culture I'm so sick of involved? What's even out there now to look forward to? From what I've seen (and I could be wrong), it seems like more games and independent publishers, but a drastically diminished pool of creativity, different ideas, and memetic diversity.


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One suggestion is to rely on a small group of people whose opinions you trust to guide you. This can include both people you know and people who review a lot of games. It is not a perfect system, but it is one way to at least minimize your exposure to the unpleasantness you seek to avoid.


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Extra Credits - Games you might not have tried (or heard of)

Other than that, what kind of games are you looking for and what kind of platform are you playing on?

Scarab Sages

I don't have many friends, and those I have either aren't gamers, or *shocking!* have different opinions and preferences than I do, or even see different things in games than I would even if we share common enthusiasm for some game titles.

It used to be I could just go to the store, look at games, and pick what I liked using my judgment alone - no third parties involved. Is there REALLY no way to have that anymore?

Scarab Sages

Sharoth wrote:


Extra Credits - Games you might not have tried (or heard of)

There isn't a text version of this, is there? One that sticks to information and isn't trying so hard put on a show of its own, perhaps (extra demerits for using an electric guitar version of the Super Mario theme - because of course everyone plays Mario games, right? To say nothing of transgressing the computer game/video game distinction)?

Sharoth wrote:

Other than that, what kind of games are you looking for and what kind of platform are you playing on?

I'm talking SPECIFICALLY about computer games (PC) - after all, you can still buy video games in stores for some reason.

As for the other question, you don't quite get it; I should be able to go into a game store (or whatever the contemporary facsimile is) and not know what I'm looking for until I see it - you can find some of the best stuff that way (or at least interesting "side-dishes").

The most I can say is that anything mundane (sports games, racing games cop/criminal games, historical military games, crap like The Sims) I could not have less interest in. I get more than enough "real life" in real life. But of course, that only rules out one small world.


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Extra Credits - Games you might not have tried # 2

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Extra Credits - Games you might not have tried # 6

Extra Credits - Games you might not have played # 7

Yes, the old game store is dying. It sucks, but that is the joy of the internet. You can look at Good Old Games, but I do not think that helps out as much as you would like. Especially since it is a game store. The best bet is to ask around and look at other sites. We will be glad to recommend some games that we like or find interesting.


I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Sharoth wrote:


Extra Credits - Games you might not have tried (or heard of)

There isn't a text version of this, is there? One that sticks to information and isn't trying so hard put on a show of its own, perhaps (extra demerits for using an electric guitar version of the Super Mario theme - because of course everyone plays Mario games, right? To say nothing of transgressing the computer game/video game distinction)?

Sharoth wrote:

Other than that, what kind of games are you looking for and what kind of platform are you playing on?

I'm talking SPECIFICALLY about computer games (PC) - after all, you can still buy video games in stores for some reason.

As for the other question, you don't quite get it; I should be able to go into a game store (or whatever the contemporary facsimile is) and not know what I'm looking for until I see it - you can find some of the best stuff that way (or at least interesting "side-dishes").

The most I can say is that anything mundane (sports games, racing games cop/criminal games, historical military games, crap like The Sims) I could not have less interest in. I get more than enough "real life" in real life. But of course, that only rules out one small world.

~grimaces~ I feel your pain. I miss those days of going into a store and wandering, looking for that interesting gem.

Scarab Sages

Sharoth wrote:

Yes, the old game store is dying. It sucks, but that is the joy of the internet.

It seems like it's already dead - and there's no joy in it at all.

Sharoth wrote:

You can look at Good Old Games, but I do not think that helps out as much as you would like. Especially since it is a game store.

I'm familiar with Good Old Games. I guess it's alright for, as the name says, "Old Games" - more than alright, even, and I don't see why it's being a "store" should bother me - but I'm asking about how I'm to go about finding NEW things.

Sharoth wrote:


The best bet is to ask around and look at other sites. We will be glad to recommend some games that we like or find interesting.

Why, oh why, must buying computer games - of all things - become another social ordeal??? I just want to find games in a format I can judge them on by myself and pick them.


~grins~ Sorry. I guess social ordeals like you and want to mob you.

Scarab Sages

Sharoth wrote:

~grimaces~ I feel your pain. I miss those days of going into a store and wandering, looking for that interesting gem.

If that possibility truly dies, then gaming dies with it. The good news is that, since I'm clearly not alone, this is the sort of thing that results in productive and justified - as opposed to irrational knee-jerk reactionary - backlash and course adjustment. As my mother observes, this Internet thing is and unprecedented paradigm shift and we're all still trying to figure it out by trial and error.

Make new friends, and keep the old...one is silicon, the other's...um...BitCoin?


Borderlands I & II - A fun first person shooter that does not take itself very seriously.

Deus Ex & Deus Ex - Human Revolution - Cyberpunk games of good quality

Civilization I through V - If they are something you like, then they will keep you occupied for a long time.

XCOM I & II - Squad based game where the aliens are here and you need to defend the Earth.

Skyrim - A classic fantasy game. I have spend close to 1000 hours playing it.

The Fallout series - Similar to Skyrim, but set after the bombs have fallen.

FTL - A fun game that is not too intensive.

Overlord - You are the bad guy. What do you do now?

Kerbal Space Program - I just wish NASA was like this.


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I for one welcome our online retail overlords.

Scarab Sages

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I've heard of most of those; none of them grab me (and I've kind of had it up to HERE with "Skyrim this, Skyrim that" - I've seen footage, heard about "Fuss-Ro-Duh" or whatever, and it just doesn't seem interesting).

I'm certainly familiar with Civilization - never played it, not terribly interested, and attempts at similar games (Caesar II, for example) have taught me I have no idea what I'm doing.

Look at my list above. How many can you say you've heard of? I've inadvertently become the guy who's out of touch with most of the popular games, but is exceptionally familiar with all the obscure gems - with this new paradigm, even finding these gems is all but impossible.


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I'm not sure I see the problem. I go to Steam, for example. I find big lists of games I can browse or search through. If you click on any one, you get pictures and a blurb along with some videos. In addition to all the user reviews and ratings.

There's an "about this game" section that's usually pretty similar to what I'd expect from the old box copy.

I'm not sure what you're really missing. I guess if it's just the difference between physical product and digital, but software is inherently a digital product. It really makes little sense to put it in boxes and ship it around.

Scarab Sages

thejeff wrote:

I'm not sure I see the problem. I go to Steam, for example. I find big lists of games I can browse or search through. If you click on any one, you get pictures and a blurb along with some videos. In addition to all the user reviews and ratings.

There's an "about this game" section that's usually pretty similar to what I'd expect from the old box copy.

I'm not sure what you're really missing. I guess if it's just the difference between physical product and digital, but software is inherently a digital product. It really makes little sense to put it in boxes and ship it around.

The loss of ritzy boxes and manuals is very sad (as an autistic savant, the Might & Magic III-IV cluebooks were some of my favorite books when I was 6-8), but I guess I can live with it. That's not what's causing my inability to spot my next cool game. My problem is...well, apparently *you* can find what you want on Steam, but it all just seems like an uncomfortable rain of nondescript alphabet blocks on my face to me.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:


Look at my list above. How many can you say you've heard of? I've inadvertently become the guy who's out of touch with most of the popular games, but is exceptionally familiar with all the obscure gems - with this new paradigm, even finding these gems is all but impossible.

Almost all of them. Most of those you listed aren't particularly obscure.

Never heard of The Neverhood or Chronomaster though.

As for how you find good computer games...you browse for them. Just like you do in a game store, but without the walking. I'm unclear what your gripes about Steam not giving the back of the box blurb are, because almost every game has something like this on it:

Quote:


Gather your party and get back to the roots of great RPG gameplay. Discuss your decisions with companions; fight foes in turn-based combat; explore an open world and interact with everything and everyone you see.

You take on the role of a young Source Hunter: your job is to rid the world of those who use the foulest of magics. Embarking on what should have been a routine murder investigation, you find yourself in the middle of a plot that threatens to destroy the very fabric of time.

    A complete revamp: Thousands of enhancements, full voiceovers, new game modes, full controller support, split-screen co-op, hours of new and revised story content, a brand-new ending, new weapon styles, new skills, new puzzles, new enemies, better loot, better balancing and much, much more!
    New game modes for extra replay. Explorer Mode for story-focused RPG fans. Classic Mode for those who want it just right. Tactician Mode for hardcore players, featuring fully reworked encounters, different traps and new and smarter enemy types. And Honour Mode, for the tactical geniuses among you!
    Pen-and-paper-like freedom. Explore many different environments, fight all kinds of fantastical creatures, and discover tons of desirable items. You will be amazed at how much freedom the games gives you.
    Manipulate the environment and use skill & spell combos to overcome your many foes. Warm up ice to create water. Boil the water to create a steam cloud. Electrify the steam cloud to create a static cloud and stun your enemies!
    Play with a friend in co-op multiplayer, either online or with dynamic split-screen.
    Unravel a deep and epic story, set in the early days of the Divinity universe. Discuss with your party members how to handle the many decisions you'll need to make.
    Classless creation lets you design the character of your choice. Endless item interaction and combinations take exploration and experimentation to new levels of freedom.

That's from Divinity: Original Sin (Enhanced Edition) by the way. A game I'd recommend since you like Baldur's Gate and Neverwinter Nights.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
My question: If I can't browse boxes in a store, how do I discover entirely new computer games in this crummy new world without having to get irrelevant armchair-critics and the Internet culture I'm so sick of involved?

Feh. Kids today, with their music and their pants.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:

The loss of ritzy boxes and manuals is very sad (as an autistic savant, the Might & Magic III-IV cluebooks were some of my favorite books when I was 6-8), but I guess I can live with it.

I feel you here though. I loved the Might and Magic IV and Neverwinter Nights books.

I suppose the latter could almost be considered my first D&D book. Much like a 3.5 or Pathfinder book, it was 70% spells. =)

Scarab Sages

quibblemuch wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
My question: If I can't browse boxes in a store, how do I discover entirely new computer games in this crummy new world without having to get irrelevant armchair-critics and the Internet culture I'm so sick of involved?
Feh. Kids today, with their music and their pants.

Kindly give me a break - saying that change is *never* bad is just as stupid as saying change is *always* bad.

Sundakan wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:


Look at my list above. How many can you say you've heard of? I've inadvertently become the guy who's out of touch with most of the popular games, but is exceptionally familiar with all the obscure gems - with this new paradigm, even finding these gems is all but impossible.

Almost all of them. Most of those you listed aren't particularly obscure.

Never heard of The Neverhood or Chronomaster though.

To be fair, I knew that some of those most certainly were not obscure, but I figured the rough majority (and certainly those two) were. My choice of wording uncharacteristically sloppy. I was drained and miserable.

Chronomaster in particular is something I find it a shame that it's so (VERY) obscure - it was sci-fi titan Roger Zelazny's final work in this universe, and was very influential to me in certain respects.

The Neverhood, on the other hand, is from the mid-1990s, but I only got my hands on a CD of it recently. It's...well, it's f#+!ing weird. It's near-entirely Claymation, and that's the least weird thing.

Sundakan wrote:


As for how you find good computer games...you browse for them. Just like you do in a game store, but without the walking. I'm unclear what your gripes about Steam not giving the back of the box blurb are, because almost every game has something like this on it:

*sigh* Okay, I'm inept or something. I tried looking for the descriptions you say are there, but I don't think I can find them. Maybe it's just the site layout that doesn't agree with me - that and the glut of material, but with so much less diversity in appearance than an aisle full of game boxes. I don't know where to start looking.


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They're hidden under a "Read More" tab. Usually below "Recent Updates" and above "System Requirements".

So it'll go:

Top of Page

Short Description/Pictures

Purchase Buttons

Recent Updates

--Very tiny space for critic blurbs "9/10 IGN", etc.

Description

System Requirements

--More Like This

User Reviews

You probably want to start looking in the section for the games you want. RPG, Action/Adventure, Racing, etc.

After a while, the "Recommended For You" section usually gets pretty smart.

Scarab Sages

Thanks, okay, that's progress - now there's just the problem of knowing what to click on when the prior page looks like this. :/

Wait...you've *really* heard of Dominus, Dark Legions, Warbreeds, and Obsidian? I mean, I can believe you knowing about them as an individual, but you imply they're not obscure, which they seem to be, for all the references to them I *haven't* heard.

Scarab Sages

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feytharn wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:

I've heard of most of those; none of them grab me (and I've kind of had it up to HERE with "Skyrim this, Skyrim that" - I've seen footage, heard about "Fuss-Ro-Duh" or whatever, and it just doesn't seem interesting).

I'm certainly familiar with Civilization - never played it, not terribly interested, and attempts at similar games (Caesar II, for example) have taught me I have no idea what I'm doing.

Look at my list above. How many can you say you've heard of? I've inadvertently become the guy who's out of touch with most of the popular games, but is exceptionally familiar with all the obscure gems - with this new paradigm, even finding these gems is all but impossible.

I have heard of / played most of the games on your list (exept Neverhood and Obsidian). I admit it is hard to give you any advice. Looking for new games - the steam store is not a bad place to start - just ignore user reviews if you don't like armchair critics - and concentrate on the screenshots and the descriptions - oh and before chosing the Genre you are looking for, chose the 'type' game - so you won't have too sludge your way through the dlc and add ons for games you don't even know.

Games you might want to check out:
RPGs
Divinity 2 - Original Sin
Pillars of Eternity
Serpent in the Staglands
Might and Magic X
Shadowrun: Dragonfall
Legend of Grimrock 1+2

Diablo Style Games:
Torchlight II
Grim Dawn
Titan Quest (not that new, but pretty and dirt cheap if you wait for sales)

Other Games
Majesty 2 Collection
War for the Overworld
Tropico Series

Scarab Sages

What other websites are there? It can't all be Steam, can it? Conventional business parlance would call that a "monopoly...."


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GreenManGaming is another good one. Generally speaking purchasing a game from there gives you a Steam Activation Code though. But they have good deals.

And there's Origin for EA games.

Amazon, though similar to GreenMan in that often you'll just get a Steam code.

I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:

Thanks, okay, that's progress - now there's just the problem of knowing what to click on when the prior page looks like this. :/

Wait...you've *really* heard of Dominus, Dark Legions, Warbreeds, and Obsidian? I mean, I can believe you knowing about them as an individual, but you imply they're not obscure, which they seem to be, for all the references to them I *haven't* heard.

You read enough "Top 10 X" lists and you'd be surprised what you hear about. After the first couple of times a "Top 10 underrated gems" or "Obscure games you should play" comes around, it's not really obscure any more.

I'm unclear what the issue there is. Just click on something random, see if it sounds good. Think of clicking the link like your eye being caught by the box and you flipping it over to read the back.

Scarab Sages

Sundakan wrote:

I'm unclear what the issue there is. Just click on something random, see if it sounds good. Think of clicking the link like your eye being caught by the box and you flipping it over to read the back.

An analogy which would work great, if only the little crematorium cubbies they've got there stood out from each other more. :/

Thank you for being helpful, by the way. I appreciate it.


I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Sundakan wrote:

I'm unclear what the issue there is. Just click on something random, see if it sounds good. Think of clicking the link like your eye being caught by the box and you flipping it over to read the back.

An analogy which would work great, if only the little crematorium cubbies they've got there stood out from each other more. :/

Thank you for being helpful, by the way. I appreciate it.

That's the analogy I'd use to. It's probably a lot more what you're used to than anything else. I'd always be overwhelmed in the old video game stores, with just the rows of boxes that are all trying so hard to be flashy none of them stand out.

Clicking on one is more like picking one out and looking at the front. At least on Steam, you get a video and a bit of blurb. Then scroll down a bit and you get "About this game", which is the kind of thing you used to get on the back of the box.

The process really isn't that different. It just seems that way.

Liberty's Edge

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Good Old Games is Steams' primary competition and they have lots of new games too these days.

On Steam if you take the time to fill out your profile the system will start making a recommendation queue that's found me some gems.

I will admit I usually find the Steam client easier to browse than the web page.

Scarab Sages

Krensky wrote:

I will admit I usually find the Steam client easier to browse than the web page.

"Client?"


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:


My question: If I can't browse boxes in a store, how do I discover entirely new computer games in this crummy new world without having to get irrelevant armchair-critics and the Internet culture I'm so sick of involved?

I watch Cynical Brit on youtube since his opinions on games are usually very similar to mine. He has a Steam Curator(The TOP Curator actually) page as well that has a large number of games I have then bought or already purchased.

He's also PC only.

My game recommendation to you is Pillars of Eternity since you enjoy Baldur's Gate and Neverwinter Nights.

#2 recommendation is Grim Dawn since it harkens back to Diablo 2 a bit. Fun game on sale right now.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Krensky wrote:

I will admit I usually find the Steam client easier to browse than the web page.

"Client?"

The program you install. It's the top right corner of the page.


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In general, the shift to online purchasing has been a net boon to the videogame industry (there is no video game/computer game distinction anymore, assuming there was ever truly such a distinction in the first place).

Steam has been a good thing. There are bad things in Steam (Early Access being abused, for example), but overall it has been a net plus for gamers. I don't have to worry about misplaced or damaged DVDs, and I have more games than I will ever reasonably play (which is my own fault, and I'm much better about not buying everything that looks good). GOG.com is also a net plus, with a different focus on older games. They have older games that wouldn't otherwise run on newer systems, but they often configure them to run on newer systems.

Losing brick and mortar shops is not that great a loss. Product exposure on Steam can far exceed anything you'd get in a store, and you do not have to worry about old games no longer being kept in stock.


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Belle Sorciere wrote:

In general, the shift to online purchasing has been a net boon to the videogame industry (there is no video game/computer game distinction anymore, assuming there was ever truly such a distinction in the first place).

Steam has been a good thing. There are bad things in Steam (Early Access being abused, for example), but overall it has been a net plus for gamers. I don't have to worry about misplaced or damaged DVDs, and I have more games than I will ever reasonably play (which is my own fault, and I'm much better about not buying everything that looks good). GOG.com is also a net plus, with a different focus on older games. They have older games that wouldn't otherwise run on newer systems, but they often configure them to run on newer systems.

Losing brick and mortar shops is not that great a loss. Product exposure on Steam can far exceed anything you'd get in a store, and you do not have to worry about old games no longer being kept in stock.

Yes, overall this change is likely a good thing. However, there are still those who will be hurt by it. Unfortunately, He Who Dwells In Very Tiny Rooms seems to be one of them.


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It took me some time to adapt but once I did dealing with Steam, Origin, GOG, etc. was pretty painless.

Then again I made the transition in 2009 (that is aside from getting Half-Life 2 on Steam a few years prior).


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Belle Sorciere wrote:

It took me some time to adapt but once I did dealing with Steam, Origin, GOG, etc. was pretty painless.

Then again I made the transition in 2009 (that is aside from getting Half-Life 2 on Steam a few years prior).

If the OP is on the Autistic Spectrum, it is likely to be harder for him. We tend to have a harder time with changes, especially ones that as big as this.

Unfortunately, this may be something that you will need your therapist or psychiatrist to help you with, assuming that you have one.


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Sharoth wrote:
Yes, the old game store is dying. It sucks, but that is the joy of the internet. You can look at Good Old Games, but I do not think that helps out as much as you would like. Especially since it is a game store. The best bet is to ask around and look at other sites. We will be glad to recommend some games that we like or find interesting.

Slight correction for you...GOG is no longer Good Old Games, and probably half their catalog is now games released within the past 5 years or so.


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Nohwear wrote:
Belle Sorciere wrote:

It took me some time to adapt but once I did dealing with Steam, Origin, GOG, etc. was pretty painless.

Then again I made the transition in 2009 (that is aside from getting Half-Life 2 on Steam a few years prior).

If the OP is on the Autistic Spectrum, it is likely to be harder for him. We tend to have a harder time with changes, especially ones that as big as this.

Unfortunately, this may be something that you will need your therapist or psychiatrist to help you with, assuming that you have one.

I'm on the spectrum as well, which may be why it took me until 2009.


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Norman Osborne wrote:
Sharoth wrote:
Yes, the old game store is dying. It sucks, but that is the joy of the internet. You can look at Good Old Games, but I do not think that helps out as much as you would like. Especially since it is a game store. The best bet is to ask around and look at other sites. We will be glad to recommend some games that we like or find interesting.
Slight correction for you...GOG is no longer Good Old Games, and probably half their catalog is now games released within the past 5 years or so.

They're still adding older games to their library, at least. At least over the past few years I recall the X-Wing games and Starfleet Command.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Look at my list above. How many can you say you've heard of? I've inadvertently become the guy who's out of touch with most of the popular games, but is exceptionally familiar with all the obscure gems - with this new paradigm, even finding these gems is all but impossible.

First off, I think you are VASTLY overestimating how "obscure" some of those games are.

Secondly, the existence of game services like Steam, GOG, and others actually make it EASIER to stumble upon lesser known games. There's a ton of great indie games that you can get that never would have had the budget for a physical release, and thus wouldn't have ever shown up in a game store.

Thirdly, yes, there will be a great many more games you see that don't interest you than those that do. This is not a phenomena exclusive to online stores, however...it's just as true in a physical game store as well.

Fourthly....the online stores may not have a physical box to look at, but they do have everything that such a box would have on it (and a lot more).


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Apparently, the Humble Bundle website also sells some games.

Scarab Sages

Nohwear wrote:


If the OP is on the Autistic Spectrum, it is likely to be harder for him. We tend to have a harder time with changes, especially ones that as big as this.

I don't - it depends on the change. Just because I don't like this change doesn't mean I object to change for objecting to change's sake. I've always held myself to be all about the future, but it's supposed to be a brighter, smarter future led by artists and scientists, not a poorer, duller one ruled by accountants who know the price of everything and the value of nothing (which itself has been largely engineered by people actively trying to erase the 20th Century and making it so the past 30-ish years have effectively been running in reverse, so calling me the one who doesn't like change is a little insulting). The Internet's great, but it should have limits, and we're still testing these limits (see what I said about my mother's observations - I think we'll eventually see some drawback once a critical is reached of people with chronic "Internet fatigue"). I think this is partly a "straw breaking the camel's back" issue for me. I have far bigger things to worry about, and this was unwelcome.

Computer game boxes used to be works of art in and of themselves, and why should we lose that forever? For those willing to pay extra for it, why can't we have both?


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I do apologize. it was meant to be a general statement designed to raise Autism awareness.

Scarab Sages

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Thank you, fair enough.

*starts seriously wondering why Tacticslion chooses to Favorite some things he does*


I am not on the autism spectrum to my knowledge, but I am not a fan of entirely online stores due to bad experiences from the early days of the internet. I get amazing things from certain sites when there is a sale, bit that's about it.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Computer game boxes used to be works of art in and of themselves, and why should we lose that forever? For those willing to pay extra for it, why can't we have both?

To be honest, the vast majority of computer game boxes (going back to the 8-bit days) were not all that artistic and, more importantly, went straight to the trash can after the disks inside were removed. They also cost quite a bit to create, ship, store, and provide space for in the stores.

There are times I feel nostalgic for browsing in a software store, but the ease of access, long term availability, and discounts we get with digital distribution are well worth the change.

As far as finding things nowadays: online reviews, browsing in the Steam client (including the Discovery Queue), things that are cheap during sales. The "best of the best" and "hidden gems" both tend to filter up if you poke around people or places interested in the same genres as you. Sales like the current Steam Summer Sale and the recent GOG one provide great opportunities to pick up things you might not have purchased otherwise. (A game can go from OK to Hidden Gem when you get it for $2 or less. :)


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I have not tried this myself, but things like Humble Bundle might be a good way to find new games. Although it is sort of a shotgun approach.


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Parody wrote:
I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
Computer game boxes used to be works of art in and of themselves, and why should we lose that forever? For those willing to pay extra for it, why can't we have both?
To be honest, the vast majority of computer game boxes (going back to the 8-bit days) were not all that artistic and, more importantly, went straight to the trash can after the disks inside were removed. They also cost quite a bit to create, ship, store, and provide space for in the stores.

And much of that cost would escalate if most sales were online and only a few were boxed and sold in stores - especially if the stores themselves were just catering to a few holdouts.

It's basic economics.

Grand Lodge

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I 2nd the Humble Bundle approach. Get 5-10 games for less than $10 (you can pay less if you want fewer games also). I've played some really great games I wouldn't have given a 2nd look at otherwise, and part of the money goes to charity.

Here is a link to the current bundle: pc-android-14-bundle.

I really enjoyed The Knights of Pen and Paper.


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I'm Hiding In Your Closet wrote:
*starts seriously wondering why Tacticslion chooses to Favorite some things he does*

I think that favoriting a post is his method of marking it as one that he has read.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

He does it because he's cool beans. :-)

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