Pure Gold Armor


Advice

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Kinda a silly idea, but looking at the primitive materials and thinking gold armor could make for an interesting character concept.

Though, I was thinking that the weak hardness might not matter, as most opponents would be very hesitant to sunder/destroy things made of solid gold....


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Here's your basic problem.

Gold is heavy... every try to lift a bar? It's freaking amazinly heavy.

It's also soft. Your armor would literally fall apart, that's why the Aztecs who were practically swimming in the metal, never tried to make armor out of it.

It is so not a good choice for primitive armor. Primitive armor is basically your leather and hide and wood family.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Murdock Mudeater wrote:

Kinda a silly idea, but looking at the primitive materials and thinking gold armor could make for an interesting character concept.

Though, I was thinking that the weak hardness might not matter, as most opponents would be very hesitant to sunder/destroy things made of solid gold....

If you have the money for it, get it magically-strengthened. Per the Ultimate Equipment rules, it's 100gp per pound of the original item. Then it's the equivalent of steel and it loses the penalty to max Dex and armor check, plus it loses the fragile quality.

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:

Here's your basic problem.

Gold is heavy... every try to lift a bar? It's freaking amazinly heavy.

It's also soft. Your armor would literally fall apart, that's why the Aztecs who were practically swimming in the metal, never tried to make armor out of it.

It is so not a good choice for primitive armor. Primitive armor is basically your leather and hide and wood family.

Primitive in the respect that Ultimate Combat calls the material primitive.

Quote:


Typically only used for ceremonial weapons and armor and for display, metal equipment made from gold is fragile, heavy, and expensive.

Often golden armor is gold-plated rather than constructed entirely from gold. Gold-plated items triple the base price of weapons and armor and have the same properties as the item the gold is plating. Items constructed purely of gold cost 10 times the normal price for items of their type. G old items weigh 50% more than typical weapons or armor of their type.

Gold is often too soft to hold a decent edge, but light weapons that deal piercing or slashing damage can be constructed of gold or some nearly gold alloy. They take a –2 penalty on damage rolls (minimum 1 damage).

Gold weapons have half the hardness of their base weapons and also have the fragile quality.

Gold can be fashioned into light or medium metal armor. The softness and the weight of the metal decrease the armor/ shield bonus by 2, and increase the armor check penalty by 2. G old armor has hardness 5. Magically strengthened gold is the equivalent of steel and can be made into any armor or weapon that can be made of steel.

So, looking at 1.5x weight and 10 times the normal cost. And only light/medium armor.

Mainly, it's a concept thing. Still, I can certainly picture roleplaying applications for the character with solid gold armor, even if it's lacking as actual armor.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Personally, I'd still magically strengthen the gold so you can have ridiculously heavy Heavy Armour and a giant golden greatsword.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Depending on the DM, I'd see about getting Acid Resistance added as gold is typically resistant to acid, plus would be good for Rust Monster hunting!


2 people marked this as a favorite.

25000 GP and you can have magically strengthened Hellknight Plate. I bet that would look awesome.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Scrapper wrote:
Depending on the DM, I'd see about getting Acid Resistance added as gold is typically resistant to acid, plus would be good for Rust Monster hunting!

Gold is as vulnerable as any other metal when it comes to Rust Monsters. They might prefer iron, but they'll happily eat gold.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Ashram wrote:
If you have the money for it, get it magically-strengthened. Per the Ultimate Equipment rules, it's 100gp per pound of the original item.

Whoah! I never noticed that rule before. I always thought you just needed to say "magic" and then all the bad stuff went away.

Was that rule errata'd in some time after the first printing or am I just totally blind?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ravingdork wrote:
Ashram wrote:
If you have the money for it, get it magically-strengthened. Per the Ultimate Equipment rules, it's 100gp per pound of the original item.

Whoah! I never noticed that rule before. I always thought you just needed to say "magic" and then all the bad stuff went away.

Was that rule errata'd in some time after the first printing or am I just totally blind?

Yeah, Paizo stealth-errataed the primitive materials rules from UC to UE. I guess they wanted a way to separate having the item be useful and being outright enhanced magically, although I wish they'd actually given a description of how it's done and if it requires materials (Like say, if there could be an alchemical version for alchemists.) Plus in some cases magically strengthening a primitive material can literally be more expensive than just enchanting it.

Gisher wrote:
Gold is as vulnerable as any other metal when it comes to Rust Monsters. They might prefer iron, but they'll happily eat gold.

That's what the impervious weapon special ability is for. ;)

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.

You can magically strengthen an object to lose the fragile quality, but in most cases, masterwork/magic takes care of that.

Weapon Fragile Quality wrote:
Fragile: Fragile weapons cannot take the beating that sturdier weapons can. A fragile weapon gains the broken condition if the wielder rolls a natural 1 on an attack roll with the weapon. If a fragile weapon is already broken, the roll of a natural 1 destroys it instead. Masterwork and magical fragile weapons lack these flaws unless otherwise noted in the item description.
Armor Fragile Quality wrote:

Fragile: Armor with the fragile quality falls apart when hit with heavy blows. if an attacker hits a creature wearing fragile armor with an attack roll of a natural 20 and confirms the critical hit (even if the creature is immune to critical hits), the armor gains the broken condition. if already broken, the armor is destroyed instead. Fragile armor is broken or destroyed by only critical threats that are generated by natural 20s.

Masterwork and magical fragile armor lacks these flaws unless otherwise noted in the item description or the special material description.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Errant_Epoch wrote:
25000 GP and you can have magically strengthened Hellknight Plate. I bet that would look awesome.

It would still quite almost literally weigh a ton.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The weight of a standard gold bar is 27.33732 pounds. However, gold is one of the most malleable of metals, and you can have gold plated armor by having gold hammered and shaped over your regular plate for significantly less weight.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Imbicatus wrote:

You can magically strengthen an object to lose the fragile quality, but in most cases, masterwork/magic takes care of that.

Weapon Fragile Quality wrote:
Fragile: Fragile weapons cannot take the beating that sturdier weapons can. A fragile weapon gains the broken condition if the wielder rolls a natural 1 on an attack roll with the weapon. If a fragile weapon is already broken, the roll of a natural 1 destroys it instead. Masterwork and magical fragile weapons lack these flaws unless otherwise noted in the item description.
Armor Fragile Quality wrote:

Fragile: Armor with the fragile quality falls apart when hit with heavy blows. if an attacker hits a creature wearing fragile armor with an attack roll of a natural 20 and confirms the critical hit (even if the creature is immune to critical hits), the armor gains the broken condition. if already broken, the armor is destroyed instead. Fragile armor is broken or destroyed by only critical threats that are generated by natural 20s.

Masterwork and magical fragile armor lacks these flaws unless otherwise noted in the item description or the special material description.

Most of the primitive materials from Ultimate Equipment are fragile unless magically strengthed, such as bone. Being made masterwork does not alleviate that drawback.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ashram wrote:
Imbicatus wrote:

You can magically strengthen an object to lose the fragile quality, but in most cases, masterwork/magic takes care of that.

Weapon Fragile Quality wrote:
Fragile: Fragile weapons cannot take the beating that sturdier weapons can. A fragile weapon gains the broken condition if the wielder rolls a natural 1 on an attack roll with the weapon. If a fragile weapon is already broken, the roll of a natural 1 destroys it instead. Masterwork and magical fragile weapons lack these flaws unless otherwise noted in the item description.
Armor Fragile Quality wrote:

Fragile: Armor with the fragile quality falls apart when hit with heavy blows. if an attacker hits a creature wearing fragile armor with an attack roll of a natural 20 and confirms the critical hit (even if the creature is immune to critical hits), the armor gains the broken condition. if already broken, the armor is destroyed instead. Fragile armor is broken or destroyed by only critical threats that are generated by natural 20s.

Masterwork and magical fragile armor lacks these flaws unless otherwise noted in the item description or the special material description.

Most of the primitive materials from Ultimate Equipment are fragile unless magically strengthed, such as bone. Being made masterwork does not alleviate that drawback.

Bone is the only primitive material that does not lose the fragile quality when made Masterwork; and it can still be either magically reinforced OR just enchanted to remove fragile.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ashram wrote:

...

Gisher wrote:
Gold is as vulnerable as any other metal when it comes to Rust Monsters. They might prefer iron, but they'll happily eat gold.
That's what the impervious weapon special ability is for. ;)

That's fine for weapons, but unless I missed something it can't be applied to gold armor.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Drahliana Moonrunner wrote:
Errant_Epoch wrote:
25000 GP and you can have magically strengthened Hellknight Plate. I bet that would look awesome.
It would still quite almost literally weigh a ton.

According to the game rules it would only weigh 75 pounds. For a high strength character that's not really a big deal.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

The Ult. Equip rules for the weight of gold items is very charitable.

Gold is actually about 2.25 times heavier than steel for the same volume of material.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

My only two cents is about the rust monster. Gold doesn't rust, real life should trump rules on that. Maybe not in PFS, but everywhere else.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Niztael wrote:
My only two cents is about the rust monster. Gold doesn't rust, real life should trump rules on that. Maybe not in PFS, but everywhere else.

Magic.

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Niztael wrote:
My only two cents is about the rust monster. Gold doesn't rust, real life should trump rules on that. Maybe not in PFS, but everywhere else.

Magic doesn't exist in real life. Magic trumps physics. Every time.

If it helps you, the Rust Monster magically corrodes metal, it doesn't oxidize it. It's just called rust because that's the only thing primitive people who know nothing about chemistry understand.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

Hoarding dragons are gonna absolutely love meeting a gold plated morsel.

Scarab Sages

5 people marked this as a favorite.

I want to have a dawnflower dervish who wears a gold chain shirt so I can be a Solid Gold dancer.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Deadbeat Doom wrote:
Bone is the only primitive material that does not lose the fragile quality when made Masterwork; and it can still be either magically reinforced OR just enchanted to remove fragile.

Wait, is there a choice there?

I have a character who uses a +5 comfort improved shadow bone breastplate and a +5 heavy bone shield.

I basically did it as a means of saving on money at low levels (since bone costs half as much) at the cost of hardness, since (A) it looked badass and (B) nobody has ever tried to sunder my stuff in our games anyways.

I really need to know if I need to spend 4,000gp to toughen it up, or if the existing magical enchantments already do that for me.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ravingdork wrote:
Deadbeat Doom wrote:
Bone is the only primitive material that does not lose the fragile quality when made Masterwork; and it can still be either magically reinforced OR just enchanted to remove fragile.

Wait, is there a choice there?

I have a character who uses a +5 comfort improved shadow bone breastplate and a +5 heavy bone shield.

I basically did it as a means of saving on money at low levels (since bone costs half as much) at the cost of hardness, since (A) it looked badass and (B) nobody has ever tried to sunder my stuff in our games anyways.

I really need to know if I need to spend 4,000gp to toughen it up, or if the existing magical enchantments already do that for me.

Per the PRD:

Bone

Bone can be used in place of wood and steel in weapons and armor. Other animal-based materials like horn, shell, and ivory also use the rules for bone weapon and armor. The cost of a bone weapon or bone armor is half the price of a normal weapon or armor of its type.

Weapons: Light and one-handed melee weapons, as well as two-handed weapons that deal bludgeoning damage only, can be crafted from bone. Hafted two-handed weapons such as spears can be crafted with bone tips, as can arrowheads. Other two-handed weapons cannot be constructed of bone.

Bone weapons have half the hardness of their base weapons and have the fragile weapon quality. Masterwork bone weapons also have the fragile quality, but magic bone weapons do not. Bone weapons take a –2 penalty on damage rolls (minimum 1 damage).

Armor: Studded leather, scale mail, breastplates, and wooden shields can all be constructed using bone. Bone either replaces the metal components of the armor, or in the case of wooden shields, large pieces of bone or shell replace the wood.

Bone armor has a hardness of 5 and has the fragile armor quality. Masterwork bone armor also has the fragile quality, but magic bone armor does not. The armor/shield bonus of bone armor is reduced by 1, but in the case of studded leather, the armor check penalty is also reduced by 1 (to 0).

Bolded by me for emphasis.

Scarab Sages

Niztael wrote:
My only two cents is about the rust monster. Gold doesn't rust, real life should trump rules on that. Maybe not in PFS, but everywhere else.

Sort of like how platinum causes fires when it touches wood alcohol (which humans can't really drink, but the other races....). Amazing that pathfinder uses platinum coins around dwarves and the other alcoholic races of pathfinder.

Then again, the rust monsters are aberrations, so real-world logic doesn't really apply to the biology of these things.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Murdock Mudeater wrote:
Niztael wrote:
My only two cents is about the rust monster. Gold doesn't rust, real life should trump rules on that. Maybe not in PFS, but everywhere else.
Sort of like how platinum causes fires when it touches wood alcohol...

That isn't true. You can dump handfuls of platinum into buckets of alcohol and you won't get a bit of flame. You can use a platinum object to ignite alcohol if you heat the object to a sufficient temperature beforehand, but that's true of any metal. It's the heat that causes ignition, not the fact that the object is made of platinum. I suspect you are vaguely remembering the platinum catalysis process. Here is a video demonstration of it. Note that no reaction occurs until after he heats the wire.


Ravingdork wrote:
Deadbeat Doom wrote:
Bone is the only primitive material that does not lose the fragile quality when made Masterwork; and it can still be either magically reinforced OR just enchanted to remove fragile.

Wait, is there a choice there?

I have a character who uses a +5 comfort improved shadow bone breastplate and a +5 heavy bone shield.

I basically did it as a means of saving on money at low levels (since bone costs half as much) at the cost of hardness, since (A) it looked badass and (B) nobody has ever tried to sunder my stuff in our games anyways.

I really need to know if I need to spend 4,000gp to toughen it up, or if the existing magical enchantments already do that for me.

KalDragon called it, the PRD goes by the Ultimate Equipment rules, which means you need to drop the money. Luckily though, since your items can be made normally of bone, they aren't technically illegal simply because they aren't toughened.


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Ashram wrote:
Ravingdork wrote:
Deadbeat Doom wrote:
Bone is the only primitive material that does not lose the fragile quality when made Masterwork; and it can still be either magically reinforced OR just enchanted to remove fragile.

Wait, is there a choice there?

I have a character who uses a +5 comfort improved shadow bone breastplate and a +5 heavy bone shield.

I basically did it as a means of saving on money at low levels (since bone costs half as much) at the cost of hardness, since (A) it looked badass and (B) nobody has ever tried to sunder my stuff in our games anyways.

I really need to know if I need to spend 4,000gp to toughen it up, or if the existing magical enchantments already do that for me.

KalDragon called it, the PRD goes by the Ultimate Equipment rules, which means you need to drop the money. Luckily though, since your items can be made normally of bone, they aren't technically illegal simply because they aren't toughened.

So I need to spend the 4,000gp to get the full AC benefits? And if I don't pay it that's all I'm missing out on (besides the hardness)?


Ravingdork wrote:

I have a character who uses a +5 comfort improved shadow bone breastplate and a +5 heavy bone shield.

I basically did it as a means of saving on money at low levels (since bone costs half as much) at the cost of hardness, since (A) it looked badass and (B) nobody has ever tried to sunder my stuff in our games anyways.

Question, did you use the 1/2 cost of the bone for the just the items cost (100gp breastplate, 3.5gp heavy shield) or did you use the 1/2 price for the masterwork and enchanting cost as well? (20175gp or 40250gp +5 I.S. breastplate (can't find cost of comfort), 12578.5gp or 25153.5gp +5 shield)


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Just the initial cost of the armor, not the masterwork property or enhancement bonuses.

Had I known about that rule, I would have just called it normal breastplate, and said it was enchanted to look like bone. Insofar as I know, there's no rule preventing that, and it costs nothing.


Shine tuned light wave on it, it will explode!


Ravingdork wrote:
Ashram wrote:
Ravingdork wrote:
Deadbeat Doom wrote:
Bone is the only primitive material that does not lose the fragile quality when made Masterwork; and it can still be either magically reinforced OR just enchanted to remove fragile.

Wait, is there a choice there?

I have a character who uses a +5 comfort improved shadow bone breastplate and a +5 heavy bone shield.

I basically did it as a means of saving on money at low levels (since bone costs half as much) at the cost of hardness, since (A) it looked badass and (B) nobody has ever tried to sunder my stuff in our games anyways.

I really need to know if I need to spend 4,000gp to toughen it up, or if the existing magical enchantments already do that for me.

KalDragon called it, the PRD goes by the Ultimate Equipment rules, which means you need to drop the money. Luckily though, since your items can be made normally of bone, they aren't technically illegal simply because they aren't toughened.
So I need to spend the 4,000gp to get the full AC benefits? And if I don't pay it that's all I'm missing out on (besides the hardness)?

You get the AC bonus, the armor check penalty increase removed, and the hardness goes up to 10.

Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder First Edition / Advice / Pure Gold Armor All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.