Girls in gaming groups


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Shadow Lodge

I play in 3 different groups plus at Society open play events in my area. Two of the groups I am in currently have 1 female player (one group originally had 2), the other has had as many as 2 women out of 8 players but currently is all male. If seems to vary, but we're averaging about 1 in 6 for female players.

In local Society open play we probably have 1 female player for every 8 to 10 male players. Very sparse most of the time. We would love for more women to show up to play; but really we'd just love for more players to be able to show up regularly. Most local events manage to have two tables with 4 players, but we love it all the more when we get full tables of 6 or even 3 tables with more than 4 players per table (average).

More players is a good thing, so more women playing is a good thing.


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Lilith wrote:
Avatar Unknown wrote:
Where the hell were these girls when I was twelve?
Ostracized by playing "a boy's game" by their peers, or not allowed to play by the boys until they met some arbitrary moving goal post for participation?

Exactly.

I remember having to keep this hobby secret and a family thing when I was young. NOTHING would have destroyed a young cheerleader's social standing faster than being geek friendly or even worse a geek herself.

I wasn't sure how to post to this... do I talk about all the sexism? do I relay stories from Sexist DMs table? do I simply state that obviously all tables I have played at had at least one woman... me? Do I go into statistics and give a breakdown? No. There was sexism and there were nice boys. Heck the sexism sometimes went wildly in my favor... you have all heard stories about the GMs girlfriend, I've been there. Boys create those situations because they don't know how to react to girls. Shower us with gifts or oppress us without mercy, sometimes both at the same time. This is why gaming with people we already know and trust is SO MUCH BETTER. They treat us like people not objects to either own or win.


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For in person games, I play every Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Two games each day on alternating weekends. Every game has at least one woman, one game has two women. One of the is a a rocket engineer, another used to write operating systems professionally. I like what they add to the games.

One game is about to get a new girl - when we finish this campaign, they have a daughter that's interested in joining. She's in middle school, but she's really bright and interested in joining up.

The rocket engineer has an interesting story. When she was 11 or so, her mother bought her the D&D rules, saying "You're interested in fantasy, I'll bet you'll like this." So she grew up running for all-girl groups in her youth. She also introduced her husband to gaming years ago.


EileenProphetofIstus wrote:
All but two of my players in the past 28 years have been females...they outnumber the males 3-2

Umm... wait. Does that mean you've only played (or is that GM'd) 5 players in the last 28 years?

To the OP - for me, over two different groups (me being the only common member), it's currently 9:1 with the 1 being the GM's wife.

In the past it's been up to 1:1 but I've only played with a couple dozen people total at this point.

The Exchange

My family kept looking at me like I had grown an extra head when I started trying to play pathfinder on the computer, at online tables. They'd frequently ask, "Why are you talking to a computer?"

I preferred to type my in-game interactions as opposed to speaking them into the mic. Sometimes I wonder if even now, my reluctance to speak in character may stem from that...

When PFS came to where I am, and I stayed out late to play(since most days were run on weekdays), they'd ask if I had to come back so late, afterall I had work the next day, just over a game and it wasn't good for a girl to be out so late at night.

If I were to join online con days, they'd complain that why would I be up at midnight to play a game(couldn't I do it during daytime- no, not possible since I'm on the opposite timezone from the rest of the world), even if the next day was a sunday, saying it was bad for my health. (Sure, as if I do it everyday)

Oh all this is in 2010 ish, so it's not as if its ancient history in the ages D&D was considered witchcraft. If parents had the same attitude as mine, I'm not surprised there aren't many girls at gaming tables.

Shadow Lodge

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Just a Mort wrote:
My family kept looking at me like I had grown an extra head when I started trying to play pathfinder on the computer, at online tables. They'd frequently ask, "Why are you talking to a computer?"

I would have asked why they were talking to a phone the next time they had a call.

The Exchange

And they go - Have you met those people in person? You shouldn't talk to strangers online, there are so many scammers out there.

Liberty's Edge

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Harleequin wrote:

One of the things I've enjoyed but been surprised about, is how its not an issue being a girl in a RPG gaming group. Most times I'm the only girl in the group but no-one has batted an eyelid.

I know RPG playing is very much seen as a geeky guy thing but I think more women are giving it a go.

Quick survey... who here has a girl in their group... and is she treated with the respect she unquestionably deserves!! ;))

The only girls I play with are my daughters. The other female players I play with are women.


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Just a Mort wrote:
My family kept looking at me like I had grown an extra head when I started trying to play pathfinder on the computer, at online tables. They'd frequently ask, "Why are you talking to a computer?"

Uh... Were the computer on or off at the time? XD

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Adventure, Lost Omens, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber
Just a Mort wrote:
And they go - Have you met those people in person? You shouldn't talk to strangers online, there are so many scammers out there.

And I go - You shouldn't talk to strangers on the phone, there are so many telemarketers out there. :)


Every game that I have played in, there has been at least 1 female player. Except for 1 game, which was all male (my last game of Pathfinder, and it was a complete disaster in which combat and numbers were the most important thing to the other 3 players, which made me abandon Pathfinder). There have been others that were all male, but they folded after 1-2 sessions, so I don't exactly count them. Due to my experience with that all male group, I refuse to play in a game without a female player. In my experience, the game lasts longer (doesn't implode after a session or two) and is more fun to me.

Of course, I haven't played in about a year now (/sadface).

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32

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Aranna wrote:
Shower us with gifts ...

I initially read that as "Shower with us" and I thought "Well, that just took a really weird turn."

The Exchange

Been playing some roleplaying game or another since I was a kid. Up until I relocated to a new highscool we had a girl in our group (she was mostly interested in playing blond elves named Legolas who looked like Orlando Bloom and cheating at die rolls, but it's not as if the rest of us were considerably more mature in our approach, and it was always good natured). In the new highscool we kinda formed a boy club when it came to D&D, not because we didn't like girlz but that's just how it happened.

Currently in my usual group, the one that carried on from high school through the years, we have trouble bringing in players because we are deep into a campaign that started like 5 years ago. However that one is on hiatus, and I'm trying to convince either the girlfriend or another girl from the group of friends to GM in my stead in a short adventure to let me get to be the player for a while. Not looking for a female GM in specific, but the rest of the players in the group are really not interested in the position.


My first group ever had three women and one man (me).

The group I GM today for has three women and two men.

The group I played with until we wrapped a month ago had three women and two men.

To date, I've only ever played in one group that had more men than women. And I've never played in a game that had only men (or only women).

Community Manager

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Removed some posts and responses. Please dial back the snark—it's not helping the discussion.


I've been playing for a long time and we've always had at least two women in our group. At present our group of 7 has 4 female players. Of course, we're mature-age and have been at this for a long time and I can see how young women might not find RPG very exciting.

Community Manager

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Quasi wrote:
I've been playing for a long time and we've always had at least two women in our group. At present our group of 7 has 4 female players. Of course, we're mature-age and have been at this for a long time and I can see how young women might not find RPG very exciting.

You're making an assumption about the young women that you speak of—how do you know they might not? Have you asked them? Given them an opportunity to play?


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ToZ wrote:


Just a Mort wrote:
My family kept looking at me like I had grown an extra head when I started trying to play pathfinder on the computer, at online tables. They'd frequently ask, "Why are you talking to a computer?"
I would have asked why they were talking to a phone the next time they had a call.

MAAAAAAAAN

THIS AIN'T MY DAAAAAD

THIS IS A CELL PHONE


Lilith wrote:
Quasi wrote:
I've been playing for a long time and we've always had at least two women in our group. At present our group of 7 has 4 female players. Of course, we're mature-age and have been at this for a long time and I can see how young women might not find RPG very exciting.
You're making an assumption about the young women that you speak of—how do you know they might not? Have you asked them? Given them an opportunity to play?

Maybe his assumption is about the stereotypes of the male gamer? I remember my early games, and I'm pretty sure no woman would have wanted to be a part of those (and yes, I AM embarrassed remembering those days).


I'm not making any assumptions, just speaking from observation. And, I did say 'young women' and also mentioned that we are 'mature' aged players. The difference in attitudes is often quite marked, going by age. Of course here in Oz, things are similar but a bit different to the US socially, so attitudes to RPG may be quite different in that age group here too.

Grand Lodge RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32, RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

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Er, I'm not sure ageism is any better than sexism.


Me and my cousin are the two girls in our group of ~7, although my cousin is usually just there and consistently doesn't know what's going on. Even so, I don't notice anyone treating us differently due to gender.

When making new characters, we usually flip a coin to determine the gender. The thing is, we use a half dollar coin our GM carries around, and I swear that thing is weighted or something, because there is an 80% chance to be female. I have tested this. And when our usual GM plays, he always, ALWAYS gets female. He's resigned to his fate and it's hysterical.


Jiggy wrote:
Er, I'm not sure ageism is any better than sexism.

Is it bigotry to note differences in general behavior and preferences in different groups? It's pretty obvious that some preferences and behaviors are more common in (but never exclusive to) one group or another.

I'd say bigotry is saying one is better than the other and/or saying someone is doing something wrong when they behave differently than most other members of the group.

Liberty's Edge

Harleequin wrote:

One of the things I've enjoyed but been surprised about, is how its not an issue being a girl in a RPG gaming group. Most times I'm the only girl in the group but no-one has batted an eyelid.

I know RPG playing is very much seen as a geeky guy thing but I think more women are giving it a go.

Quick survey... who here has a girl in their group... and is she treated with the respect she unquestionably deserves!! ;))

Considering our Venture Captain for PFS is a woman, she is treated with the highest level of respect because of her experience and her knowledge of the game. But she is not the only woman to play regularly in my area so I don't see it as an uncommon occurrence.

I do remember the day when that was not true so I am very glad that RPG groups have grown over the decades when I first started to play.

Grand Lodge RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32, RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

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Lemmy wrote:
Jiggy wrote:
Er, I'm not sure ageism is any better than sexism.

Is it bigotry to note differences in behavior and preferences in different groups?

I'd say bigotry is saying one is better than the other and/or saying someone is doing something wrong when they behave differently than most other members of the group.

I disagree. There are plenty of ways to discriminate against a group without condemning them. One example is simple exclusion (i.e., "Group X isn't really into activity Y, so I didn't bother inviting them"). Another classic example is certain forms of sexism, such as asking for help from someone of a certain gender based on what task you're doing (like when someone at work came over to my desk and said 'I need a man to come lift this thing for me').

Now, maybe that doesn't fit the word "bigotry", but that was your word choice, not mine. The point is, discrimination is much broader than condemnation, and condemnation is not the only part of it that's wrong and needs to stop.

EDIT: Another example would be if I started up a campaign after moving to a new town, and the people who showed up were all 40+ years old and heavyset. If I then decided I'd run a very "kill things and take their stuff" type of dungeon-crawling scenario where character personality mostly consists of dwarven beer humor because I thought that's what I'd like, that's still pretty not-cool even if I don't see it as "bad" or "inferior" or whatever. It still would have been better for me to actually talk to those individuals directly about what THEY want in a game, regardless of what trends I've seen among other individuals who happen to be similar in age and weight to this group. Again, prejudice is about more than just condemnation.


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Jiggy wrote:
Lemmy wrote:
Jiggy wrote:
Er, I'm not sure ageism is any better than sexism.

Is it bigotry to note differences in behavior and preferences in different groups?

I'd say bigotry is saying one is better than the other and/or saying someone is doing something wrong when they behave differently than most other members of the group.

I disagree. There are plenty of ways to discriminate against a group without condemning them. One example is simple exclusion (i.e., "Group X isn't really into activity Y, so I didn't bother inviting them"). Another classic example is certain forms of sexism, such as asking for help from someone of a certain gender based on what task you're doing (like when someone at work came over to my desk and said 'I need a man to come lift this thing for me').

Now, maybe that doesn't fit the word "bigotry", but that was your word choice, not mine. The point is, discrimination is much broader than condemnation, and condemnation is not the only part of it that's wrong and needs to stop.

While I agree that discrimination is wider than condemnation, I have to disagree about the extent... If I have to ask someone for help, I'll ask someone who has a greater chance of being helpful.

When I needed to apply make up for a school play many years ago, I asked help from female friends, not because I think there's something wrong with men who use make up or with women who don't... But simply because considering that I see far more women using make up than men, that tells me it's more likely for an woman to have that particular skill than a man. Similarly, even though I never had any strength contest to measure which of my friends are the strongest ones, if I needed help to move a heavy object, I'd call one of my male friends first... Not because every man is stronger than every woman or because it's wrong for women to be physically strong... But simply because on average men are physically stronger than women, so calling a man would mean a higher chance of success on moving that heavy object.

Inviting people is a little different, though... When I want to have company on a certain activity, I invite people whom I like and whom I think also enjoy my company... Then I learn if they like whatever activity I proposed and keep that knowledge for future reference. The good thing about this case is that it can be done on a case-by-case basis.

There's a difference between pattern recognition and discrimination.

Grand Lodge RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32, RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

Lemmy wrote:
When I needed to apply make up for a school play many years ago, I asked help from female friends, not because I think there's something wrong with men who use make up or with women who don't... But simply because considering that I see far more women using make up than men, that tells me it's more likely for an woman to have that particular skill than a man. Similarly, even though I never had any strength contest to measure which of my friends are the strongest ones, if I needed help to move a heavy object, I'd call one of my male friends first... Not because every man is stronger than every woman or because it's wrong for women to be physically strong... But simply because on average men are physically stronger than women, so calling a man would mean a higher chance...

Those are kind of weird examples; were you asking for help from people you'd never met before? Wouldn't it make more sense to ask for help from individuals whom you had seen actually wear or apply makeup, or from whoever had the thickest arms, rather than from one or the other gender pool? I guess I just don't see the relevance of your examples, or how it actually works against my point in any way.

Quote:
There's a difference between pattern recognition and discrimination.

While this is true, it's simultaneously true that prejudice is very often built on a foundation of pattern recognition. Nobody pulls their biases out of their ass.

(Also, have a look at my edit; I think it might be more illustrative than some of what I was saying earlier.)


Male player since 1st Ed 1982 here. Experience current and in the past below

Currently I wouldn't say so much play as observe and attempt to play. One Pathfinder game I was in a friend's wife decided to join, and she was so out of her depth she only came down to be with her fiancé (at the time). Later on when we switched to Heroes Unlimited/Nightbane by Palladium, she decided to go see other friends and not join. My other friend's wife only plays when he runs, but she decided to bow out yet again due to massive social inadequacies that I doubt she will ever overcome. In my other Pathfinder game, one player's girlfriend joined, but the game is at such a high level (10-11th) and she's coming mostly rules blind, that I doubt she really wants to play. So it's essentially all married guys in one group (except me), and all unmarried, relationshipless (for the most part) 30+ guys that I game with. Hence why I started up a play by post just to get different people to game with and avoid the massive sausage conservative Republican misogynist fest my second group has, and my other group only meets once a month if we're lucky. (Kids and jobs, especially management kill more games then stupid players....)

Now in the past, I had TONS of female gamers, going back at least into the early 90s. My group during high school was 50% men and women, then in college it ran from 10% to 90%. However, Magic the Gathering came out and crushed most of the roleplaying from the local university, generating super arrogant card nerds and destroying a once lively establishment. Then it was off and on from late 90s on to about 2009, and then it went poof. I moved to two towns that had jack available for gaming (even one with a population of a million, but no players), and then moved back to my current town and the two games I am in. I would love to find a decent gaming group around the Southwest Michigan area that runs Pathfinder in real life or via roll20. Anyone know of any?


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stormcrow27 wrote:
I would love to find a decent gaming group around the Southwest Michigan area that runs Pathfinder in real life or via roll20. Anyone know of any?

The beauty of roll20 (or another online platform) is that you can game with people around the world. I DM a game right now with the following:

Belgian
Brit (Englishman?)
Canadian
American

It's a blast.


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Jiggy wrote:
Those are kind of weird examples; were you asking for help from people you'd never met before? Wouldn't it make more sense to ask for help from individuals whom you had seen actually wear or apply makeup, or from whoever had the thickest arms, rather than from one or the other gender pool? I guess I just don't see the relevance of your examples, or how it actually works against my point in any way.

At the moment, I was backstage and none of the people there were much more than acquaintances... So I simply asked one of the girls for help. She and one of her friends were nice enough to help me. And hey... They knew much more about make up than me! And any of the other guys who were there and were just as helpless as me.

There is nothing wrong with saying "women are less likely to enjoy competitive sports, compared to men". There is, however, a lot wrong with saying "Women shouldn't like sports, are bad at sports and shouldn't do sports!". The former is simply an observation. The second is bigotry.

Gender is, of course, only one of the factors that influence our preferences and behavior. Age is another one.

Of course, there is also cultural influence, but claiming biology isn't a factor is disingenuous at best. Evolution doesn't stop at our necks... Our physiology has great impact on our preferences and behavior, and gender and age have great impact on our physiology.

So guessing what people are more likely to do/enjoy/whatever based on age and gender isn't necessarily discrimination (key word is "necessarily". Sometimes it is.).

I do think everyone should be treated with equal respected and be at least given an opportunity to enjoy whatever it is you want people to participate in... But if I decided to take my niece and nephew to the movies, even if I had no idea what movies they like, it'd be foolish to take them to see "Schindler's List" instead of Star Wars, since 99% of 8-yo don't like that movie.

Jiggy wrote:
Quote:
There's a difference between pattern recognition and discrimination.
While this is true, it's simultaneously true that prejudice is very often built on a foundation of pattern recognition. Nobody pulls their biases out of their ass.

Well... Yeah... Sometimes. A lot of prejudice is "inherited" from other people's opinion and/or propaganda and simply never checked (or even discussed). Other times, it's a misjudgment on the cause of that behavior, and there are also the times where it's an exaggeration of an actual behavioral pattern. Often it's just pulled out of someone's ass to justify an unjustified opinion.

tl;dr: It's okay to try and guess what people are more likely to do/enjoy based on stuff like gender, age, nationality, etc... It's wrong to tell them what they are "supposed" to do/enjoy based on stuff like gender, age, nationality, etc...

Grand Lodge RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32, RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

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Lemmy wrote:
There is nothing wrong with saying "women are less likely to enjoy competitive sports, compared to men".

There is plenty wrong with saying that.


Jiggy wrote:
Lemmy wrote:
There is nothing wrong with saying "women are less likely to enjoy competitive sports, compared to men".
There is plenty wrong with saying that.

It doesn't add or reduce the value of anyone or anything. It's simply a neutral statement based on observation. There are fewer women than men who enjoy competitive sports... At worst, the statement is incorrect (I don't think it's, but that's irrelevant), but I honestly don't see anything morally wrong with that.

Or that "women are more likely than men to have long hair"? Should we pretend everything is done and/or enjoyed in the same proportion by men and women? We all know that's not the case.

EDIT: Just to be clear, when I say women are "less likely" to enjoy competitive sports, I don't mean that women are worse at doing it, only that, statistically, enjoying competitive sports is more common among men than it is among women... Whatever physical/psychological characteristics make a person enjoy those sports is more common among men than than among women.

I sincerely don't see what's wrong with acknowledging that.

Liberty's Edge

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Lemmy wrote:
Would it be wrong to say "women are more likely than men to have long hair"? Should we pretend everything is done and/or enjoyed in the same proportion by men and women? We all know that's not the case.

Statistically? No it isn't.

But the main reasons for that are cultural. And, indeed, one of the main reasons is this attitude specifically. It's a self-fulfilling prophecy. As children, girls are told not to like many traditionally masculine things and experience social pressure not to and derision when they do, thus they don't like them (or display liking them) as adults.

I know, as a guy, I've gotten s~%* for liking some non stereo-typically masculine activities, and also s~+% for not liking some stereotypical masculine ones.

In short, this attitude is an issue, not precisely because it isn't true more often than not but because assumptions of any sort about a group like women or men or people of a certain age rapidly become culturally reinforced, and thus lead to censure any people who violate the stereotypes. And that's obviously bad.

So...it's better just not to make assumptions about anyone on the basis of what groups they belong to.

Community Manager

Let's keep this on topic, please.


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Deadmanwalking wrote:
Lemmy wrote:
Would it be wrong to say "women are more likely than men to have long hair"? Should we pretend everything is done and/or enjoyed in the same proportion by men and women? We all know that's not the case.

Statistically? No.

But the main reasons for that are cultural. And, indeed, one of the main reasons is this attitude specifically. It's a self-fulfilling prophecy. As children, girls are told not to like many traditionally masculine things and experience social pressure not to and derision when they do, thus they don't like them (or display liking them) as adults.

I know, as a guy, I've gotten s*&& for liking some non stereo-typically masculine activities, and also s~@& for not liking some stereotypical masculine ones.

In short, this attitude is an issue, not precisely because it isn't true more often than not but because assumptions of any sort about a group like women or men or people of a certain age rapidly become culturally reinforced, and thus lead to censure any people who violate the stereotypes. And that's obviously bad.

I'm not sure if "the main reason is cultural". It might very well be tied to genetics, hormones or any other physiological characteristics. I can't say how much that factors in... Doesn't matter either.

(That said, the current tendency of ignoring physiological influences on human behavior and attribute all of it to cultural influences and/or discrimination is as blatantly wrong as denying evolution, IMHO).

Deadmanwalking wrote:
So...it's better just not to make assumptions about anyone on the basis of what groups they belong to.

If possible, it's always best to judge things on a case-by-case basis, but that's not always possible or practical. Acknowledging that there are behavioral differences between different groups of people isn't wrong.


Liz Courts wrote:
Let's keep this on topic, please.

My apologies, Liz. I believe I didn't do anything that goes against the forum rules, but I'll drop the argument.

Liberty's Edge

Lemmy wrote:
Liz Courts wrote:
Let's keep this on topic, please.
My apologies, Liz. I believe I didn't do anything that goes against the forum rules, but I'll drop the argument.

Me, too.

And I don't think it was against the rules, just off-topic for the thread. You want to continue it in another Thread (presumably in Off-Topic) that'd probably be fine. I'd join in.

Community Manager

Ageism is certainly worthy of discussion—just not in this thread. :)


Deadmanwalking wrote:
Lemmy wrote:
Liz Courts wrote:
Let's keep this on topic, please.
My apologies, Liz. I believe I didn't do anything that goes against the forum rules, but I'll drop the argument.

Me, too.

And I don't think it was against the rules, just off-topic for the thread. You want to continue it in another Thread (presumably in Off-Topic) that'd probably be fine. I'd join in.

Honestly, DMW... No. Maybe some other day.

Don't get me wrong... I think you're one of the most sensible posters around here and I'm sure you have good arguments (even if I probably disagree with them)... It's just that I really don't have the energy or patience to participate in long internet arguments that I pretty much know how will end anyway.

Being totally honest... I don't even know why I put as much effort here as I did. I guess I failed my Will save. :P

Liberty's Edge

Lemmy wrote:

Honestly, DMW... No. Maybe some other day.

Don't get me wrong... I think you're one of the most sensible posters around here and I'm sure you have good arguments (even if I probably disagree with them)...

Aw, thanks man. I'm blushing here.

Lemmy wrote:

It's just that I really don't have the energy or patience to participate in long internet arguments that I pretty much know how will end anyway.

Being totally honest... I don't even know why I put as much effort here as I did. I guess I failed my Will save. :P

Yeah, I've done that. And I probably shouldn't get involved in any arguments either...I just have a Will Save penalty against internet arguments.


Deadmanwalking wrote:
Aw, thanks man. I'm blushing here.

Liar! Zombies don't blush! You probably don't even have blood!

Liberty's Edge

Lemmy wrote:
Deadmanwalking wrote:
Aw, thanks man. I'm blushing here.
Liar! Zombies don't blush! You probably don't even have blood!

I'm blushing inside. In the meaty bits.


Deadmanwalking wrote:
Lemmy wrote:
Deadmanwalking wrote:
Aw, thanks man. I'm blushing here.
Liar! Zombies don't blush! You probably don't even have blood!
I'm blushing inside. In the meaty bits.

That sounds like sexual harassment... XD


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Lemmy wrote:
That sounds like sexual harassment... XD

...

...

Okay, back on to topic:

Is there a trend for one gender or the other to lean closer towards narrative/story style versus mechanical/crunch style?

I'm not talking system understanding/mastery here, but I've noticed that more women have a narrative/story style in groups I've played with, backed with 'crunch', whereas more men have 'crunch' sometimes backed with narrative/story?

Before this sidetracks to a powergame/character-driven discussion, that's not my goal here.

I prefer story/narrative, but I've seen more women lean towards that direction in my play than men? I think it's great, wish there was more of it, honestly?

Liberty's Edge

My twice a month Saturday group draws from a pool of 42 gamers, of which 17 are women and the table usually winds up splitting even.

My weekly Sunday group is 3 men, 3 women.

My weekly midweek group is a game I run for my daughter and her friends, all women.

Respect universally all 'round here!

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