Marvel’s Luke Cage on Netflix


Television

251 to 300 of 372 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | next > last >>

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Purple Dragon Knight wrote:
Callous Jack wrote:
Plus the obvious power source on the back made me wonder why Cage didn't crush it.
A lot of what I find wrong with this show seems to stem from the way they wrote Luke Cage as a very low INT character. Either low INT or clinically depressed or pathologically mellow (did I miss a show where they show him suck back five joints in a row? because that's how he seems to act the entire season...)

I think you were watching a different show than me

Sovereign Court

Maybe they stream it different in Canada... after all our Prime Minister got elected on the promise of legalizing weed...


I think Cage was trying to minimize collateral damage and to not kill Diamondback. He might have assumed that crushing/damaging the power pack might electrocute or otherwise kill Diamondback, and even risked exploding in a residential area.


Thomas Seitz wrote:

Purple,

It's good enough for me to warrant it since I doubt we'll get Heroes for Hire any time soon.

Pretty sure the Defenders is going to fill out the superhero teamup slot. Then again, we still might see the HFH in season two.


Delightful,

Maybe but I'm doubtful about that.

Sovereign Court

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'm just waiting for that moment:

Coulson: "Luke Cage, I present thee, your long lost cousin: Nicolas Cage!"
Nicolas Cage: "I'mma da reallllll Ghost Rider y'all!!!"


Purple,

Some how I think Marvel wants to forget about that. If they do bring in another Ghost Rider/Johnny Blaze, it won't be Nick Cage. Maybe Robert Pattinson?


Thomas Seitz wrote:

Purple,

Some how I think Marvel wants to forget about that. If they do bring in another Ghost Rider/Johnny Blaze, it won't be Nick Cage. Maybe Robert Pattinson?

at least the special effect and imagery were cool if they could of just got the acting and story more polished.


Well I keep hoping for a Ghost Rider/Blade team up on Netflix.


Thomas Seitz wrote:
Well I keep hoping for a Ghost Rider/Blade team up on Netflix.

I could totally watch a marvel Knights series if only we could have Wesley snipes as blade for the whole thing but hes kind of moody apparently and flaky.


They likelihood of them casting the same actor for the same part in an MCU project that starred in a previous non-MCU adaptation is pretty damn slim.


Oh I agree but you know I can dream

Shadow Lodge Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 8

Purple Dragon Knight wrote:

I'm just waiting for that moment:

Coulson: "Luke Cage, I present thee, your long lost cousin: Nicolas Cage!"
Nicolas Cage: "I'mma da reallllll Ghost Rider y'all!!!"

The funny thing being, Nicholas Cage literally named himself after Luke Cage.


Thomas Seitz wrote:

Purple,

Some how I think Marvel wants to forget about that. If they do bring in another Ghost Rider/Johnny Blaze, it won't be Nick Cage. Maybe Robert Pattinson?

Ghost Rider has been appearing on Agents of Shield this season. Robbie Reyes played by Gabriel Luna.

Sovereign Court

4 people marked this as a favorite.

He's the 'car' ghost rider dude though... da real deal is the 'bike' ghost rider! :)


Little,

I'm not suggesting Robbie Reyes ISN'T a Ghost Rider. But I do think some of us here (especially those fans of Marvel Knights and Netflix) would like to see the Supernatural/magic side explored through say, Ghost Rider (aka Johnny Blaze, Danny Ketch or both) along side Blade, and maybe Moon Knight.

Also agree the likely hood of them getting Wesley to commit to a long term TV show (even at only 8-13 episodes) seems unlikely right now.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Robbie breathed a lot of life into ghost rider(lol just realized what I wrote) and provided an excellent storyline. I love blaze and ketch, but their storyline has been going on about 10 years too long, although I *really* enjoyed the multiple spirits of vengeance storyline, which I'm thinking robbie easily fits into.


Free,

I'm not against it. Hell I like too, especially since it opened the doors for past and future Ghost Riders. I just think, based on the Netflix stuff, if we go 'supernatural dark' Ghost Rider needs to be there. Just not sure it should be Robbie.


Sat down and watch the series this week.

Overall I liked it. I think JJ was much better constructed, but this was better than either season of DD.

It did suffer from the same problem as DD though, the main character was the weakest one in the series. The "strong, silent type" is very cliched and kind of stale. It's hard to pull of well or interestingly these days, it can be done, but there are big hurdles to overcome. When Luke was passionate and vocal, the character was interesting. His brooding silence though was boring and dull.

Also, the show engaged in a rhetorical argument against it's own existence several times and that annoys the crap out of me. The main character wants to just leave and doesn't see why he should be involved. If he doesn't care about the story, it starts to make me wonder why I should care.

I did appreciate that they didn't do a lot of drawn out action sequences. Especially in the first half of the season when there's little to no tension in the scenes. Short and sweet scenes to the point.

Missick and Rossi were both very fun to watch as Det. Knight and Shades respectively. Knight was predictable within the genre, but had enough twists and depths to keep her interesting and engaging. Shades was the most interesting villain to watch IMO, seemed like he actually wanted to survive and thrive. The actor did a good job of adding layers to his emotions that really indicated that the wheels were turning inside his head.

I thought the references to current events in the real world were a nice touch.

Sovereign Court

Irontruth wrote:
Also, the show engaged in a rhetorical argument against it's own existence several times and that annoys the crap out of me. The main character wants to just leave and doesn't see why he should be involved. If he doesn't care about the story, it starts to make me wonder why I should care.

He cares.


Hama wrote:
Irontruth wrote:
Also, the show engaged in a rhetorical argument against it's own existence several times and that annoys the crap out of me. The main character wants to just leave and doesn't see why he should be involved. If he doesn't care about the story, it starts to make me wonder why I should care.
He cares.

Pay attention to what I'm saying in that paragraph. I'm pointing out that there are several scenes in the season where another character has to convince Luke that he cares. I find those scenes annoying and stupid.

There really isn't anything to debate here, because:

1) those scenes exist
2) this is my opinion about those scenes

Also note, just prior to that statement, I talked about how Luke was most engaging when HE was most engaged. Those times where he was being passionate and convincing other characters to act, he was actually interesting.

So, I understand that he cares. But those scenes where he acts like he doesn't, I find uninteresting.


Freehold DM wrote:
Robbie breathed a lot of life into ghost rider(lol just realized what I wrote) and provided an excellent storyline. I love blaze and ketch, but their storyline has been going on about 10 years too long, although I *really* enjoyed the multiple spirits of vengeance storyline, which I'm thinking robbie easily fits into.

Seriously THIS.


Irontruth wrote:

Sat down and watch the series this week.

Overall I liked it. I think JJ was much better constructed, but this was better than either season of DD.

It did suffer from the same problem as DD though, the main character was the weakest one in the series. The "strong, silent type" is very cliched and kind of stale. It's hard to pull of well or interestingly these days, it can be done, but there are big hurdles to overcome. When Luke was passionate and vocal, the character was interesting. His brooding silence though was boring and dull.

Also, the show engaged in a rhetorical argument against it's own existence several times and that annoys the crap out of me. The main character wants to just leave and doesn't see why he should be involved. If he doesn't care about the story, it starts to make me wonder why I should care.

I did appreciate that they didn't do a lot of drawn out action sequences. Especially in the first half of the season when there's little to no tension in the scenes. Short and sweet scenes to the point.

Missick and Rossi were both very fun to watch as Det. Knight and Shades respectively. Knight was predictable within the genre, but had enough twists and depths to keep her interesting and engaging. Shades was the most interesting villain to watch IMO, seemed like he actually wanted to survive and thrive. The actor did a good job of adding layers to his emotions that really indicated that the wheels were turning inside his head.

I thought the references to current events in the real world were a nice touch.

I really loved the way Shades didn't just want to survive and thrive, but he wanted those around him to as well. He actually cared about the other villains.


Yeah, Shades was by far the most interesting villain of the season. Cottonmouth and Diamondback were almost cartoonish at times.


Cottonmouth wasn't cartoonish enough, while Diamondback was enjoyably so. Shades was kind of dull.


Bjørn Røyrvik wrote:
Cottonmouth wasn't cartoonish enough, while Diamondback was enjoyably so. Shades was kind of dull.

We must agree to disagree. Diamondback was a huge letdown for me, and a huge part of that was his cartoonish insanity.

Sovereign Court

Shades has been described by one of my friends as "Seth Meyers with a 'one' setting on the hair clipper - basically, not very threatening!"


Really? I'm shocked that anyone disliked Shades. Everyone I've spoken to about it has agreed that he's one of the best parts of the show. A pragmatic and unflinching villain who is smart and sensible is a lot of fun. I also didn't like Diamondback much due to his insane randomness. I like villains who have motivations and act on them, not crazed psychopaths. Cottonmouth was fun while he lasted but I wish they'd have kept him up a bit longer.

Sovereign Court

I kinda liked Shade when I thought he was the herald to something dark and scary... when I saw Diamondback... well...


Shades isn't a herald. He's just the go to guy for getting things done when it needs it. Plus he proved he was smarter than almost everyone around him.

Diamondback was pretty cartoonish, but I think the fact he killed people made him dangerous.

Cottonmouth was dangerous too but more in a mid-level mafia type/gangster type you knew normal people couldn't take head on.


I thought Diamondback being so over the top actually worked as a contrast to Cottonmouth/Shades/Mariah, who were pretty straightforward sensible villains

Sovereign Court

MMCJawa wrote:
I thought Diamondback being so over the top actually worked as a contrast to Cottonmouth/Shades/Mariah, who were pretty straightforward sensible villains

Its true, its always nice to see a guy so bad he makes the bad guys squirm.


Meh. I like my bad guys to be scary and reasonable.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Thomas Seitz wrote:
Meh. I like my bad guys to be scary and reasonable.

Ditto.

It feels more like a meaningful victory when the good-guy beats a bad-guy who *isn't* over-the-top crazyflakes and wasn't going to get himself killed off with his short-sighted 'let's make enemies of *everyone* and kill off valuable allies, just to be quirky, while we're at it!' poor impulse control if the hero just stayed home and ignored him for a couple of weeks.

When the hero beats someone like that, I just think 'Yay. You could have gone on a cruise, and the bad-guy would be just as dead by the time you got back, 'cause he was a swinging bag of nuts who used Russian roulette as a conversation starter.'


I don't mind crazy, it's just being stupid and crazy that makes for a bad combo.


5 people marked this as a favorite.

Like the Joker in Nolan's movie. We never learn his actual motivations as a person, but we come to appreciate him as a self-perceived agent of change. The strength of his desire is not realistic, but the character is great for challenging the preconceived notions of other characters and the audience (and things go wrong when his ideas are challenged).

Thinking of another thread, it's not that he's realistic as a person, but his representation of the brutal and chaotic forces of life itself. The true moment of triumph over the Joker comes when the inmate on the ferry breaks the detonator, and he refuses to play the game. It isn't a victory over a mad man, but victory against all the s$!! that life can throw at us.

Diamondback kind of fails at this and a lot of it has to do with the writing of the show. Luke's defeat of Diamondback is him moving on from his past, but the thing is that this past isn't really Luke's. A lot of this is stuff he wasn't aware of and had no decision in. It's not really his past, but his father's past. It would have been much more interesting if the situation were one of Luke's doing and a reconciliation of his own misdeeds.

Example of how I'd fix the plot: Luke had stolen the car and was drunk, ends up killing Ms. Stryker. This was before current laws against drunk driving, so he was sent to the Marines. Fast forward to the final fight, instead of knocking Diamondback out at the end of non-resistance, he reaches behind him and breaks the power source, while he whispers an apology and hands him over to the police.

It would have made Luke metaphorically responsible for everything their father did to Diamondback's mother, tying the son directly to the sins of the father (and conversely, his apology would destroy Diamondback's power). It would make more sense, since it's never mentioned that the father is dead, we're actually led to believe that he's still alive.


I like your ideas Iron.


Irontruth wrote:

Like the Joker in Nolan's movie. We never learn his actual motivations as a person, but we come to appreciate him as a self-perceived agent of change. The strength of his desire is not realistic, but the character is great for challenging the preconceived notions of other characters and the audience (and things go wrong when his ideas are challenged).

Thinking of another thread, it's not that he's realistic as a person, but his representation of the brutal and chaotic forces of life itself. The true moment of triumph over the Joker comes when the inmate on the ferry breaks the detonator, and he refuses to play the game. It isn't a victory over a mad man, but victory against all the s$#~ that life can throw at us.

Diamondback kind of fails at this and a lot of it has to do with the writing of the show. Luke's defeat of Diamondback is him moving on from his past, but the thing is that this past isn't really Luke's. A lot of this is stuff he wasn't aware of and had no decision in. It's not really his past, but his father's past. It would have been much more interesting if the situation were one of Luke's doing and a reconciliation of his own misdeeds.

Example of how I'd fix the plot: Luke had stolen the car and was drunk, ends up killing Ms. Stryker. This was before current laws against drunk driving, so he was sent to the Marines. Fast forward to the final fight, instead of knocking Diamondback out at the end of non-resistance, he reaches behind him and breaks the power source, while he whispers an apology and hands him over to the police.

It would have made Luke metaphorically responsible for everything their father did to Diamondback's mother, tying the son directly to the sins of the father (and conversely, his apology would destroy Diamondback's power). It would make more sense, since it's never mentioned that the father is dead, we're actually led to believe that he's still alive.

good stuff, irontruth. Good stuff...


Finally got to watch it. I enjoyed it, though I agree Diamondback was weaksauce compared to the other villains on the table, and probably the worst one of all the villains in the Netflix Marvel stuff so far. Shades was excellent and I easily could have watched the rest of the season with him being the little devil on Maria and Cottonmouth's shoulder. It helped that he got some REALLY good lines ("Whatchu talkin' bout Willis?" in particular, though "He goes by Law Yer") is a close second) and never seemed to be done in by doing anything particularly stupid even when he did screw up. How a henchman that smart ended up working that close to a loony like Diamondback is beyond me.

To be honest, Mariah didn't really grip me either. The biggest flaw of this series was its villains, the two interesting ones (Shades and Cottonmouth) were marginalized, and the two less interesting ones were given the whole show.

It's kind of a shame that Shades is so g!$ d##n good at his job (getting things done and making problems go away) because if he wasn't, Mariah would be out of the picture too. Kind of a Catch-22. I like him because he's smart and efficient, but he reduces his own prominence in events by that same intelligence and efficiency.

Luke Cage really shone in its comedy. I laughed a lot during this show, either in the intentional moments (Anyone else catch that sign that said something along the lines of "If we wanted Superfreaks in Harlem, we'd invite Rick James"?) or unintentional (Diamondback's ham and cheese factory).

All in all, I'd rank the series' so far as: Daredevil (Season 1), Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and then Daredevil (Season 2. Seriously, how did you screw up so badly that you made fighting ninjas boring?). I look forward to more of Luke Cage...though not necessarily his adventures in Harlem.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Irontruth wrote:
Like the Joker in Nolan's movie. We never learn his actual motivations as a person, but we come to appreciate him as a self-perceived agent of change. The strength of his desire is not realistic, but the character is great for challenging the preconceived notions of other characters and the audience (and things go wrong when his ideas are challenged).

I liked the Nolan Joker because he was *desperate* to 'prove' that everybody else was just like him, and that he wasn't damaged or 'weak' or whatever for having fallen to this state. He kept trying to force monstrous choices on people (like the ferry situation, where one group could murder the other to survive) because it was vital to his own self-identity to 'prove' that everybody else would make the same horrible choices, and that *he* wasn't the monster of the story. He didn't have to recognize his own weakness, if he could justify it by saying that 'anybody would have done it.'

And not just Batman, but even the felons on the ferry, kept proving him wrong. Everybody, deep down inside, *wasn't* all 'just like him,' which meant that there *was* something wrong with him after all...

I thought that was one heck of a great bit of characterization, and not all villains, from either company, get anywhere near that sort of depth, IMO.


Freehold DM wrote:
Robbie breathed a lot of life into ghost rider(lol just realized what I wrote) and provided an excellent storyline. I love blaze and ketch, but their storyline has been going on about 10 years too long, although I *really* enjoyed the multiple spirits of vengeance storyline, which I'm thinking robbie easily fits into.

While I hated Robbie in the comics... AoS version is REALLY pretty awesome. It's the most I've ever liked anything to do with that version...

that said, I personally don't really feel like Ketch's story has ever really been TOLD yet. We've seen a ton of Blaze and I'd be ok with him sitting on the bench for a while... but 90% of Ketch's story in the 90's was all about how mysterious he was and how he had no idea about his origins... Doesn't help that ever since Blaze became a rider again... he's usurped every unique and cool thing that Danny's version had going for him...

Only a tiny sliver of his time on the bike has actually dealt with what his ghost rider was... and most of that was contradictory and goofy crap that almost immediately gets retconned into lies resetting his back to the 'mysterious' status quo...

I think there is a lot of decent story that they could use with Ketch.


New teaser trailer for Luke Cage season 2 which debuts June 22

Liberty's Edge

Offical Trailer for season 2.


Interesting. Will watch.


Well they certainly changed up Bushmaster from what I remember him. But that's cool! :)


I heard "Wishmaster". Oops?

Sovereign Court

I heard wishmaster too


Weird....I didn't. But then again I was expecting Bushman from the Moon Knight series. Eh. This is fine too.

RPG Superstar 2015 Top 8

I think they're using the names of that Cobra villain team from the comics--all villains named after snakes (Cottonmouth, Diamondback, Bushmaster). But very re-envisioned.

Based on the trailer though, I'm most interested in seeing Black Mariah rise to power. That's what I wanted for the second half of the first season, and then she was weirdly sidelined for the Diamondback plot which I just found boring as f##@.


cool, tough they shouldn't spoil so much in the trailer

251 to 300 of 372 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Gamer Life / Entertainment / Television / Marvel’s Luke Cage on Netflix All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.