1001 Inconsequential Flora & Fauna


Homebrew and House Rules

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Mark Hoover 330 wrote:
Could insightful PCs use the living vines a way to move around/over heat-based obstacles? The fluff describes the Maidenhair growing beside lava or steam, but the plant itself remains cool to the touch. Could the PCs use a vine to climb down the side of an active volcano, immune to the ambient heat as long...

I suppose that as long as the heat isn't sufficient to kill the vines (since they aren't fire-proof or anything, and too much heat will wither them way more quickly than too much cholesterol will kill a human), they could be used that way.


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105?
Wanderbulbs are small, ambulatory plants typically found in warm (preferably humid) environs. When stationary, they look like leafy pods atop a mass of thick roots and vines, often topped with a deep-purple six-petaled flower; when mobile, the flower retracts and the root/vine tendrils are used for locomotion. Wanderbulbs range in size from two inches in diameter for the central pod, up to a foot in diameter most commonly, with the largest specimens reaching two feet wide.

Wanderbulbs are sometimes kept as pets by the botanically inclined, and can serve as familiars (granting a +3 Diplomacy bonus).


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106: Ghost Mold

A blue green fungus that emits a faint, pale light. It can live and grow on nearly any type of surface, and is found in temperate and sub-tropical climes. It does not grow well in sunlight.

The fungus is not actually native the prime material plane, but lives on the ethereal plane, and so can be found wherever the border between the ethereal plane and a neighboring plane is weak, or is crossed regularly. For example if a ghost has a common place to manifest, then a ghost mold colony can develop. Magic items that can travel to the ethereal plane can grow ghost mold if they remain stationary for extended periods of time.

Getting rid of ghost mold can be a frustrating task, as it is anchored on the ethereal plane, making it resistant to good old fashioned elbow grease.

Ghost mold that grows on the Plane of Shadow is purple in color, but instead of emitting light, gives off a faint ringing sound, much like a mild case of tinnitus. If collected and brought to the Material plane it retains it's Plane of Shadow properties (though as it grows it becomes more like normal ghost mold), and has very strong light absorbing properties, creating a light level one lower than normal within 1 foot of the mold.

Ingesting ghost mold can have hallucinogenic effects and cause severe illness.


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107: Red Ferns
These grow under the trees a lot. They use the green light that other plants just reflect off. The fiddle heads are great, cooked with butter. You can render the adult plants to make red dye out of the different chlorophyll. While red tide is very toxic, you would have to really concentrate red fern chlorophyll to even make a base for dust of sneezing and coughing.


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108. Thunder Scorpions
In rugged deserts littered with buttes, mesas and such, lightning strikes are common place. They are also frequently the hunting grounds of Blue Dragons. Amid this atmospheric calamity thrives the Thunder Scorpion.

These Diminutive vermin are very much like their more mundane kinfolk, sleeping during the hottest portions of the day and hunting for food and warmth at night. The quality that sets them apart from other scorpion varieties is that, instead of absorbing warmth from the sun while they bask, Thunder Scorpions instead store static discharge instead.

They can be identified by their cobalt markings and their tendency to dart even faster than common desert scorpions. Their namesake comes from the peculiarity of their strike. A Thunder Scorpion does not produce venom, per se, but rather an electrically charged injection which acts like a powerful paralytic on its prey. This strike and the ensuing discharge is accompanied by a tiny "boom" like a thunderclap.

The distinctive sound, no more jarring than a pair of orc's hands slapping together to creatures larger than the scorpion, adds to the stunning effect of the vermin's strike on its immediate prey. Thanks to the acoustics of the creature's environment however, occasionally a nearby Thunder Scorpion can trick travelers into taking cover from impending lightning strikes.


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109.Southern Reindeer
Just like reindeer except without all the fur. They are often farmed by spellcasters because the antlers they shed yearly are good for making wands. Both sexes have antlers, they can pull carts as well as sleds, and they can be battle trained. In temperate regions they grow fur in the fall and shed in the spring.

110.Torchwood Tree
Leaves and flowers grow in clusters at the end of branches on this tree. The leaves do not fall till crowded off by new growth in the spring. In late fall and all winter the branches can be broken off to use as ready made torches. While burning, seeds pop off and if they land in soil will take root.


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111: Teacup Dog

This rare category of dog was bred to be as small as possible. They are typically owned by the wealthy. Teacup dogs cannot be combat trained. Use young templated fox statistics.


112. Ducks.

Seriously they're not in Pathfinder

EDIT: Oh nevermind, I found them. They're in Equipment for some reason =P

DUCKS


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112. Black Heartvine

This vine burrows into a living tree, slowly taking over its functions over a decade or more until it blooms, producing vast quantities of black fruit from all the branches of the tree and killing its host. The fruit is sickly sweet but not actually harmful aside from spreading the black heartvine's seeds. Wood from a tree killed this way is generally rotten and of little value.

The black heartvine blooming is considered a dire omen by some, but this carries no magical weight.

113. Animate chairs

Thought to be a degenerate form of the mimic these creatures are almost never hostile and try to avoid being seen moving at all costs. They feed on shed hair and dust, and if it weren't for their unfortunate fashion sense, and tendency to leave and move into houses of their own choosing from time to time they would be valued possessions.


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114. Humanticore

This manticore variant is nothing more than a standard magical beast of the same name but with an entirely human face. In place of it's normal Bite attack, the Humanticore instead has a Fascinate effect; it can speak common with a dull monotone, usually droning on about the weather, it's office job, or the state of traffic in the area

115. Drowned Grass

These marsh plants resemble reeds or cattails but their tubers emit tiny amounts of gas for a couple of weeks in late fall, before the whole stalk goes woody. These bubbles indicate when the tubers are best for harvesting as a survival food. An old folktale suggests that the plant's presence marks where a person has drowned. While there is no firm evidence to support this, statistics do show considerably more drownings occur in marshes with these plants present.


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116. Potentaters. Originally the product of ill-conceived cross-pollination, this tuber is found in the wild in swamps and near goblin lairs of all types. The plant itself grows about three feet tall with simple purple flowers. The problem is that it smells worse than an undead gorgon with halitosis. And that's upwind. Anything with a sense of smell coming within 60' of the flowers must make a DC 8 Fort save or be nauseated for 1d4 rounds, until the sense of smell is overwhelmed. Goblins, mites, and redcaps are all immune to this effect. If the roots are dug up, they are a great substitute for potatoes, having a hint of garlic flavor and are highly nutritious. Goblins have tried to weaponize the flower to no avail, as it's a very fragile blossom.


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117. Coquimander. A Coquimander (or "Piranha of the Jungle") is an aposematic amphibian that weighs approximately 2 lbs. and resembles a 6-legged frog with a long and thin, yet muscular prehensile tail that has a fin on the end-- this fin at the end is used for swimming, grasping, holding, and steering while gliding. Between their six legs are webbing that allows them to glide (not fly) while their tail aids in steering. They have a soft, delicate skin covered in a thin layer of mucous, which is usually either gold, blue, green, red, or orange or a combination of other bright colors; this mucous is highly poisonous, causing a mix of immediate pain and numbness throughout the body, ultimately resulting in paralysis (Contact Poison, Fort DC: 17) for 1d4 hours. But, if a Coquimander is known for anything, it's their unrivaled ability to jump incredible distances with their 4 powerful hind-legs; Coquimanders have been known to jump as high as 40ft into the air before opening their legs and gliding back to the ground.

Coquimanders are diurnal (often hunting near their predators unbothered) and omnivorous, and like their salamander cousins, have sharp, needle-like teeth. They typically eat fruit, seeds, buds, flowers, insects, gastropods, spiders, fungi, bird's eggs, and tree sap. Despite their size, Coquimanders are extremely dangerous, especially in large numbers. Coquimanders learned long ago that aposematism can only keep certain predators at bay, not all of them; so in order to survive, they usually group in large numbers, and often live in colonies of 2,000+ Coquimanders. Some of the largest colonies of Coquimanders on record are estimated between 40,000 and 43,000.

Coquimanders have many predators including storks, birds of prey, crows, gulls, ducks, terns, herons, pine martens, stoats, weasels, polecats, badgers, otters, and snakes, however these creatures rarely survive the poison, as the paralysis effect is powerful enough to stop the lungs from breathing in most smaller creatures. Whether or not the predator survives the poison, it's almost always the last time they try to eat a coquimander.

While Coquimanders are omnivorous, in exceptionally large swarms (5,000+) they tend to be almost strictly carnivorous, using their numbers and toxicity to their advantage to attack anything and everything in their path indiscriminately; Coquimanders have killed creatures as large as Giant Apes, Elephants, Giant Elk, War Bulls, and even Tyrannosaurus Rex and other dinosaurs.

118. Othur Fume Sundew This is a Gargantuan-sized carnivorous plant that lays its 8 long and wide green leaves across the ground, purposefully exposing it's center Sundew flower. It is often called a "Fire Flower" as a cautionary name to remind children to stay away from them, because the center flower is an alluring bright red, orange, and yellow, and has several cavities that produce pools of a highly adhesive glue-like substance that appears like dew and water. It tricks it's prey into believing it can get a quick drink, and then as soon as it attempts to get the "water", their tongue, arm, or whatever appendage becomes stuck in the pool of adhesive glue, and the trap is sprung! Within 2 seconds, the wide green leaves roll up to form a sphere around the prey and the center flower, and now the prey is encased in an airtight barrier, and then the center flower begins releasing burst after burst of a naturally-occuring poisonous gas that is similar to Burnt Othur Fumes.

Type poison (inhaled); Save Fortitude DC 18; Frequency 1/round for 6 rounds; Cure 2 consecutive saves
Initial Effect: 1 Con drain, Secondary Effect: 1d3 Con damage

The poisonous gas that is released is also a digestive accelerant - it can digest a medium creature in 3 days, a large creature in 6 days, and a huge creature in 12 days. Once the prey is fully digested, the 8 wide green leaves end their sphere and lay back down on the ground, and the prey has seemingly vaporized. Bones, textiles, metals, and any fleshy tissue are all gone, and the only evidence of the prey when the leaves open is a pink, misty cloud of blood and an exceptionally strong smell of decay. Both the smell and the bloody mist are dispersed by the wind in roughly 15 minutes to two hours, depending on the wind levels.

119. Mimic Mimic. This creature is a master at mimicking Mimics, lulling Mimics into a false sense of security, and then the Mimic Mimic eats the Mimic.


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120. Dopplerganger This curious aberration has been imbued with atmospheric forces, giving it a fairly bizarre form of ambush predation. The creature is able to mimic any kind of weather disturbance which it's prey might find worthwhile or advantageous. The only prey a Dopplerganger hunts and consumes however are the spiritual energies of the Oni.

So for example if a Kigyo (merfolk oni) were attempting to ambush a passing ship by night, a Dopplerganger may adopt the form of a bank of fog suddenly rolling in. As the Kigyo begins to move through the fog however to make its assualt undetected, the Dopplerganger would solidify into its base form and slay the material body of the Oni in order to sup on it's spiritual essence.

In their base form a Dopplerganger is a Huge sized creature, mainly composed of a central trunk of eyes and mouths, supported by 17 tentacles. The trunk has a great lamprey-like mouth in the center which opens to twice its normal size and distends in order to draw in and consume the spiritual essence of an Oni. At will however the creature can assume a gaseous form that resembles a cloud, mist, smoke, or some other innocuous, airborne vapor. They can even become invisible.

A Dopplerganger has an innate sense of all weather patterns in a one mile radius from itself, as well as the ability to detect the essence of an Oni and it's relative power in much the same way that a Paladin detects evil. Finally, a Dopplerganger may use Control Weather 1/day as a Druid (CL 13) in order to attract Oni closer to it, then assume the form of a weather phenomena manifesting as part of the spell in order to blend seamlessly with the local atmosphere.


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MrCharisma wrote:

121. Ducks.

Seriously they're not in Pathfinder

EDIT: Oh nevermind, I found them. They're in Equipment for some reason =P

DUCKS

122. Dire ducks, also called geese. Canadian geese are especially vicious.


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It's always fun to take Prestidigitation and add it to a mundane creature for something new an fun to add to my games

123. Candlewick Rodent: typically a common mouse or rat that glows with the intensity of a candle flame. This light instinctively dims when the rodent is afraid. Sometimes canny adventurers, spelunkers, or tunnel custodians capture and use these creatures as both light sources and visual alarms

124. Hunterstain Vines: the long, thin tendrils of these climbing vines tend to collect a viscous purplish sap. Often growing in dense clumps, it is difficult for larger prey to avoid contact with the vines when pursuing smaller prey through the undergrowth. When the sap is exposed to the air the purple hue becomes quite bold and pronounced, though the effect generally lasts only for an hour or so before it fades to a dull stain. During this first bloom of the color however the sap cannot be removed or reduced in any way save by magical means.

125. Tinderpuff Onions: when harvested the long bulbs of these vegetables emit a soft but audible pop as a puff of woody cinder-scented smoke rises into the air. While the smoke quickly disappates and generally has no ill effect on the gardener, the scent can linger for minutes depending on the prevailing breezes. If large quantities of the onions are harvested at once the smell can resemble the last embers of a campfire. Despite their odd emission, these onions have a generally mild, if smoky flavor.

126. Devilspit Peppers: these are short, cylindrical peppers that tend to grow in hot, dry climates. Their heat index is so intense they cannot be seeded with bare hands. for up to one day after harvest, but before the seeds are removed, Devilspit peppers will emit an actual aura of heat. This aura is not enough to deal damage of any kind but it can raise ambient temperature slightly. Often whole bushels of the peppers are harvested late in the day and then hung to dry by night where the gardener sleeps below them, removing the need for a campfire. The seeds of a Devilspit pepper, if carefully crushed and mixe with oil, can be used as an irritant.

127. Teacup tulips: a rare variant of the standard flowering bulb, Teacup Tulips bloom once in a season. When the petals open however they freeze over with a waxy substance that is mostly a sugary coating. The bloom resembles a tiny teacup and can actually hold up to half a cup of liquid. the waxy outer coating even generally flows over an external stamen and forms a handle of sorts. The "teacup" is usable for 24 hours after blooming, unless a hot drink (such as tea) is poured into it in which case the device is usable only for up to 1 hour. Finally, the entire flower, bulb, stem, leaves and petals are edible, though they are of little nutritional value. The "teacups" however pack extra calories and are extremely sweet, like a candied dessert.

128. Dirigible Squirrels: Diminutive squirrels, a smaller variant of the common Flying Squirrel, these creatures were long ago affected by the ambient magics of the world. They have the similar hollow bone structure of birds but also an extra gland that allows these squirrels to become effectively weightless for roughly an hour, each day (usable in multiples of 1 minute intervals). Using this gland the Dirigible Squirrel can also emit small currents of air and, combined with the skin flaps that permit them to glide these creatures can achieve true flight during short periods. Dirigible Squirrels are not only sought by alchemists for their unique physiology but by trappers for the luxurious fur they develop.

129. Frostberries: a curious blackberry aberration, these berries only ripen under frost conditions. As they ripen, the internal layers of the berries somehow retain the ambient cold of the environment around them. So it is that, after ripening, these fruits after harvest will actualy relase this cold when steeped or consumed. Frostberries cannot be boiled or made into a preserve in a conventional way, though some ambitious canners have developed a cold steeping method instead. The berries can also be dehydrated for long use as well. While the sensation is cooling, this effect is not strong enough deal any actual damage to the consumer, nor does this counteract any ongoing Heat effect. Some travelers however take handfuls of the dried Frostberries and brew a cold tea for themselves so that they have a cold drink in hotter environments.

130. Dryclean Moth: these curious insects are both a blessing and a curse to a community. The creatures' saliva contains enzymes which help remove many substances that stain or soil fabrics, which these moths then consume as their primary source of food, leaving the fabrics they've infested clean and their colors refreshed. Unfortunately the residual enzymes are highly flammable so, for the next hour after exposure to Dryclean Moths any fabric is far more susceptible to ignition until it fully airs out. Also the moths themselves will combust and be consumed if exposed to open flame. A single moth is not a concern but if a swarm of these were to be exposed to open flame it can create a huge cloud of fire that can even start a building burning.

Dark Archive

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Ooh, prestidigitation critters, fun!

131. Murderbugs: These small beetles are bright red, like freshly spilled blood, which happens to be their favorite food source. Unlike insects like ticks and mosquitos, they lack an effective means of extracting blood, and instead tend to hang around predators, or fishing vessels, or butchers, or battlefields, places where they can be assured a regular supply of their favorite repast. To avoid predation by birds or bats or rodents, murderbugs blend into their red surroundings. And since very few sailing vessels or butcher shops are a bloody red, they solve this problem by secreting a fine mist at rest that settles onto surrounding surfaces and dyes them the same bloody scarlet hue of the beetles themselves. This dye tends to break down or wash off if not the beetles do not remain, fading within days, but if they remain, the areas they frequent will continue to resemble a particularly brutal crime scene...

Yeah, normal critters blend into their surroundings. This critter paints its surroundings to resemble itself!


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132. Hensteeth- These birds, more closely related to pigeons than hens, are completely normal- save for their miniature humanoid teeth, of which they have 32. These teeth develop just like any other humanoid's teeth over the course of the henstooth's first year of life, and are slightly larger than the bird's orifice, making it almost always smile- and not in a warm or friendly way.

They have surprisingly few predators, as almost all beings that look upon it are disturbed by the rather large grimace it offers as an initial defense before utilizing wing buffets and bites(instead of pecks) like any other bird. Cats of all types in particular generally avoid them, and will run away from hensteeth unless cornered.

In terms of food, hensteeth enjoy berries and certain leaves, and their delicate stomachs mean that even large gossips(a group of 3 or more hensteeth) rarely do much damage to the ecosystem. The call of a henstooth is a rather harsh sounding coo, their teeth muffling the softer parts of the sound and amplifying the harder ones.

Hensteeth are powerful flyers with a large range of activity, and prefer the day to the night. They are starting to make their way to the urban square, where they are both loved for their light- to dark-reddish brown plumage and loathed for their bravado: they have no fear of humans and will fly away if shooed but eventually return to the same spot after a time. Magic users sometimes take one on as a familiar, and they offer a +2 bonus to Intimidation checks, as the blackbead eyes and wide grin of the henstooth is far from charming.


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133: Celestial light mice-They resemble some candlewick rodents, except they are native to the upper planes. They are detectably good and fire their eye beams at vermin doing destructive behavior. +3 ranged attack, 1D4 each, 20 ft range. Counts as an energy weapon. Some are calling them church mice as they are appearing in churches who's priesthood is of the highest moral fiber.


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134: Gushrumps. These fungi can escape predation and find more fertile ground by taking flight, undulating their caps like some kind of plant-based, airborne jellyfish.

135: Ghoststeps. These milk-white toadstools are incredibly toxic, quickly and painlessly destroying the liver about eight hours after consumed.
Some people claim lost spirits are drawn to places where ghoststep grows. Others that a carefully brewed tea made of the fungus can grant the ability to see and speak with ghosts. And some say that ghoststep can form a stairway to the next world.

136: Destroying Dawn. These mushrooms easily grow over three feet in height and take on a buttery yellow color. Their trumpet-like caps release a steady stream of poisonous spores that paralyze the lungs and heart.

137: Bladebriar. These thick, wicked-looking thistle plants are as sharp and brittle as glass.
A square covered in bladebriar is considered difficult terrain. Anyone entering a square covered in bladebriar risks being cut by the razor-thin leaves and barbs (+10, 1 piercing and slashing). The bladebriar is destroyed after it makes such an attack.
Due to it's extremely fragile nature, bladebriar can only grow in the most secluded and prestine glades and valleys.

138: Sand whale. These strangle and gentle behemoths swim through the dunes of the world's largest deserts. They do not seem to eat or drink, so whether or not they are animals is still a fact heavily debated.

139: Wandering hillock. These enormous mollusks build shells much like ordinary snails, except they can reach 20ft at their peaks. Prone to long periods of torpor, wandering hillock earn their name from the lush vegetation that often grows on their backs, from crab grass and dandelions to small copeses of trees. The odd witch or hermit has been known to build their cabin on the back of these sleepy creatures.

140: Forest rays. Eerie creatures that glide sliently through the forest, forest rays resemble their water-dwelling namesakes in most ways. They have no barb, no mouth, and fly by apparently magical means. Forest rays are purely nocturnal and supposedly fond of music.

141: Moon yak. These burly creatures appear to be snow-white cousins of buffalo and oxen. They travel in small groups of one to six, grazing on even the toughest and thorniest of shrubs. Moon yaks are known to walk at a slow, ambling gait even in their sleep, and can cast Ghost Sound, Jump and Silence each 1/day (caster level=HD).

142: Walking Gertrude. This odd plant can grow over ten feet tall in thin, spidery shoots similar to bamboo. The plant is capable of very slow movement, covering a few yards in as many days.
It is rumored that powered Walking Gertrude, sprinkled unknowingly into someone's shoes, invokes a strong wanderlust in the wearer and makes it much easier for them to find themselves lost.

143: Remember-me-stills. A dark, velvety moss with tiny, white, star-shaped flowers, remember-me-stills seem to grow best on the mounds of the honored dead.

144: Burrorill. These strange, frightening birds are the size of a stout raven, with short, blunted wings and massive beaks. They have been known to attack much larger creatures than themselves, diving down from above to burrow into their prey's flesh like living drills to feed on fresh blood.

145: Stinging fluff. What appears to be a cloud of dandelion or milkweed seeds on the wind is actually a swarm of tiny, feathery insects. Their bites are surprisingly painful, leaving hot red welts for several days on unprotected skin.


Quixote wrote:

134: Gushrumps. These fungi can escape predation and find more fertile ground by taking flight, undulating their caps like some kind of plant-based, airborne jellyfish.

135: Ghoststeps. These milk-white toadstools are incredibly toxic, quickly and painlessly destroying the liver about eight hours after consumed.
Some people claim lost spirits are drawn to places where ghoststep grows. Others that a carefully brewed tea made of the fungus can grant the ability to see and speak with ghosts. And some say that ghoststep can form a stairway to the next world.

136: Destroying Dawn. These mushrooms easily grow over three feet in height and take on a buttery yellow color. Their trumpet-like caps release a steady stream of poisonous spores that paralyze the lungs and heart.

137: Bladebriar. These thick, wicked-looking thistle plants are as sharp and brittle as glass.
A square covered in bladebriar is considered difficult terrain. Anyone entering a square covered in bladebriar risks being cut by the razor-thin leaves and barbs (+10, 1 piercing and slashing). The bladebriar is destroyed after it makes such an attack.
Due to it's extremely fragile nature, bladebriar can only grow in the most secluded and pristine glades and valleys.

138: Sand whale. These strange and gentle behemoths swim through the dunes of the world's largest deserts. They do not seem to eat or drink, so whether or not they are animals is still a fact heavily debated.

139: Wandering hillock. These enormous mollusks build shells much like ordinary snails, except they can reach 20ft at their peaks. Prone to long periods of torpor, wandering hillock earn their name from the lush vegetation that often grows on their backs, from crab grass and dandelions to small copses of trees. The odd witch or hermit has been known to build their cabin on the back of these sleepy creatures.

140: Forest rays. Eerie creatures that glide silently through the forest, forest rays resemble their water-dwelling namesakes in most ways. They have no...

Had to correct the obvious typos.


Quixote said wrote:


140: Forest rays. Eerie creatures that glide silently through the forest, forest rays resemble their water-dwelling namesakes in most ways. They have no barb, no mouth, and fly by apparently magical means. Forest rays are purely nocturnal and supposedly fond of music.

141: Moon yak. These burly creatures appear to be snow-white cousins of buffalo and oxen. They travel in small groups of one to six, grazing on even the toughest and thorniest of shrubs. Moon yaks are known to walk at a slow, ambling gait even in their sleep, and can cast Ghost Sound, Jump and Silence each 1/day (caster level=HD).

142: Walking Gertrude. This odd plant can grow over ten feet tall in thin, spidery shoots similar to bamboo. The plant is capable of very slow movement, covering a few yards in as many days.
It is rumored that powered Walking Gertrude, sprinkled unknowingly into someone's shoes, invokes a strong wanderlust in the wearer and makes it much easier for them to find themselves lost.

143: Remember-me-stills. A dark, velvety moss with tiny, white, star-shaped flowers, remember-me-stills seem to grow best on the mounds of the honored dead.

144: Burrorill. These strange, frightening birds are the size of a stout raven, with short, blunted wings and massive beaks. They have been known to attack much larger creatures than themselves, diving down from above to burrow into their prey's flesh like living drills to feed on fresh blood.

145: Stinging fluff. What appears to be a cloud of dandelion or milkweed seeds on the wind is actually a swarm of tiny, feathery insects. Their bites are surprisingly painful, leaving hot red welts for several days on unprotected skin.

Some of this is major hazards. Cool.


Goth Guru wrote:
133: Celestial light mice-They resemble some candlewick rodents, except they are native to the upper planes. They are detectably good and fire their eye beams at vermin doing destructive behavior. +3 ranged attack, 1D4 each, 20 ft range. Counts as an energy weapon. Some are calling them church mice as they are appearing in churches who's priesthood is of the highest moral fiber.

Holy cow! The title of this thread is "1001 Inconsequential Flora & Fauna." I assume Celestial Light Mice deal Energy damage of some kind with their eye beams. These things could murder some CR 1/4 monsters... Small or even Medium sized MONSTERS... in a single, lucky shot.

I mean, if it's that kinda thread, awesome! Another thing I like to do in my game worlds is add other cantrips besides Prestidigitation for minor helpful or harmful flora and fauna. I've been holding off on posting those however b/c I thought my Ice Vines, vines that grow in cold climates or underground and shoot Ray of Frost at potential fertilizer was too "consequential" for this thread.

If we can straight-up WEAPONIZE our little critters and such, well then... :)


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146
Orange Army Hedge: This hedge is easily identified by it's brilliant orange foliage, and that it grows in lines. A mature hedge will grow between Five to eight feet in height. In late summer is flowers, and it's It’s seed pods will drop in late Fall. The seed pods will then march in lines until just before the first frost. The seed pods prefer to march in an orderly line to better hide their numbers.

146a
Dire Orange Army Hedge: As above but the seed pods build primitive armor and weapons for themselves before marching. Given that the seed pods still average only a quarter of an inch tall, they are only aggressive to creatures of a similar size. Orcs, and Hobgoblins see these plants as good omens.


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Mark Hoover 330 wrote:
Goth Guru wrote:
133: Celestial light mice-They resemble some candlewick rodents, except they are native to the upper planes. They are detectably good and fire their eye beams at vermin doing destructive behavior. +3 ranged attack, 1D4 each, 20 ft range. Counts as an energy weapon. Some are calling them church mice as they are appearing in churches who's priesthood is of the highest moral fiber.

Holy cow! The title of this thread is "1001 Inconsequential Flora & Fauna." I assume Celestial Light Mice deal Energy damage of some kind with their eye beams. These things could murder some CR 1/4 monsters... Small or even Medium sized MONSTERS... in a single, lucky shot.

I mean, if it's that kinda thread, awesome! Another thing I like to do in my game worlds is add other cantrips besides Prestidigitation for minor helpful or harmful flora and fauna. I've been holding off on posting those however b/c I thought my Ice Vines, vines that grow in cold climates or underground and shoot Ray of Frost at potential fertilizer was too "consequential" for this thread.

If we can straight-up WEAPONIZE our little critters and such, well then... :)

Good points. Back the damage to 1 point damage per eye beam. Not available as a familiar till a feat is taken for an advanced familiar and at least 7 total levels. Of course good alignment.


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147. Prismatic Spider

Prismatic spiders are about the size of a common wolf spider, and they weave helix-shaped webs that reflect light in such a way as to entrance and captivate their prey with curious beams of rainbow-like patterns. Perhaps the most iconic trait of a Prismatic Spider is its ability to bend light around it, actually displacing its true position with a mirage. When a Prismatic Spider is in direct sunlight, it can ride the lightwaves to "jump" blindingly fast up to 30ft away, and it happens so quickly that any untrained observer would swear that they were teleporting. This makes them exceptional diurnal hunters that can choose to track down their prey if the helix-web strategy isn't working, and helps them avoid their natural predators like birds and lizards. Prismatic Spiders are highly reclusive and extremely territorial, but only towards other Prismatic Spiders. The only time that a Prismatic Spider is willing to be near another Prismatic Spider is for mating purposes. Prismatic Spiders ostensibly prefer warm climates with year-round sun.

148. Toffyfruit

Toffyfruit is shaped similar to a pear, but it is nearly 3 times as large, and it excretes a cinnamon-smelling sugary syrup from its pores that can be smelled for almost a hundred yards away even by humans. If the syrup falls to the ground, it hardens and crystallizes, and can be enjoyed like rock candy. Strangely, this fruit grows best when exposed to as minimal light as possible while benefiting from the maximum amount of water possible. So Toffyfruit Trees exclusively inhabit areas where they can benefit from canopy-like shade from forests with tall trees and in regions with an abundance of rainfall or near rivers and waterfalls that produce clouds of watery mist. Toffyfruit is a true delicacy because of its rarity and difficulty to harvest; due to its incessant need for water and nutrients from its tree, a Toffyfruit must be consumed within only a few hours of being picked from its tree branches or it dries out and becomes fermented and intolerably sour. If it becomes sour, the syrup on the fruit's skin can still be eaten like rock candy, but the fruit itself can be kept and distilled for making mead and wine.


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149. Bonetails. These long, woody stems tend to grow in thick swathes along the edges of bogs, marshes and swamps. Beautiful cream-colored blossoms give way to small pods bursting with silky coma. Once empty, however, these pods bear an eerie resembles to human skulls. The wind moving through bonetails in the fall and winter months sounds uncannily like whispering voices.


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150.Ebonrose Lily: these water lilies are held sacred by the clergy of a neutral patron of Death and Repose. Unlike the typical white blossom, these curious aquatic plants develop a spiraling bud, purely black in color. The buds rise in early spring, bloom several times over the summer months and die back in the fall.

151.Wren of Good Hope: a curious songbird with brilliant plumage of fiery red and white, the Wren of Good Hope is so named because it often appears in midst of armed conflict. Their songs are strangely uplifting to those who stop to hear them over the sounds of battle. While the myth is that they come to inspire hope in the warriors they reach through the melee, they are in fact attracted to the vermin that usually stalk such battlefields afterwards. Regardless, there are orders of knights and paladins who take the Wren of Good Hope as a sign and swear an oath to the beauty and majesty they invoke

152.Gilded Monkey: cousin to the Tamarin monkey, the Gilded Monkey has a similar "moustache" but with a distinct golden color to it. Ironically these primates also share something in common with Ravens and some other birds; a fascination for shiny objects. Gilded Monkeys are a nuisance at bazars and market places though there exists a certain religion dedicated to mercantilism which takes the Gilded Monkey as an omen of good fortune.

Three entries inspired by popular Golarion deities.


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153. Fiddlehead ferns. In the early stages of growth, the sprouts of these otherwise ordinary ferns are known to sound like a bow across a fiddle when moved by the wind or passersby. The faster or more vigorous the motion, the more lively the tune the plants seem to strike up.
Those who eat these ferns claim a quicker, lighter step after consuming them.

154. Sassyfras. The root and bark of these trees can be used to make a tea that is rich, earthy and spicy. The trees are seldom sought out, however, due to their penchant for pranks and mischief. Tripping roots, pinching twigs and lashing switches make harvesting more trouble than it's worth.


154. Halfling and gnome villages cultivate a border of these to protect from evil longshanks. Special flutes and dittys put plants to sleep.

152. It is a great insult to that religion to suggest Kender evolved from Gilded Monkeys. Gilded Monkeys can be trained to only steal from your enemies.


155: Clay Familiar

A Clay Familiar is a variant of creatures that have been Familiars, either in this life, or a previous one, but aren’t necessarily still serving as a Familiar. They have a CL 20 Clay Skin spell active, except it lasts for 24 hours, and reapplies itself every 24 hours. However, this doesn’t offer complete protection, as all damage negated by the spell is dealt as nonlethal damage that can’t be blocked by the Clay Skin spell it normally has. As a result, most Clay Familiars have a higher chance of survival than a normal member of their species.

The way a Clay Familiar comes into exist is through violence. When either the Familiar is slain, and is reborn, or its master is slain, the former Familiar gains a magical protection. This is a sort of cosmic joke, as they likely won’t be able to make use of the protection to its fullest now that they no longer are a Familiar.

A feat (named Clay Familiar) can be taken by a prospective master, allowing them to take a Clay Familiar as a regular Familiar, and thus if they have Improved Familiar and this feat, they can select a Clay Familiar as an Improved Familiar option that is just a non-Improved Familiar with a template, such as an Entropic Clay Familiar, or Celestial Clay Familiar. Alternatively, if they have this feat and Improved Familiar, they can take a regular Clay Familiar, but the Clay Skin spell is upgraded to a Stoneskin spell.


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156) Cave Dogs: Not canids at all, but a type of hyaenidae, who have evolved a habituation to and commensalist relationship with various "primitive" humanoid communities. (Essentially hyena-derived dingos.)


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Reksew_Trebla wrote:

155: Clay Familiar

A Clay Familiar is a variant of creatures that have been Familiars, either in this life, or a previous one, but aren’t necessarily still serving as a Familiar. They have a CL 20 Clay Skin spell active, except it lasts for 24 hours, and reapplies itself every 24 hours. However, this doesn’t offer complete protection, as all damage negated by the spell is dealt as nonlethal damage that can’t be blocked by the Clay Skin spell it normally has. As a result, most Clay Familiars have a higher chance of survival than a normal member of their species.

The way a Clay Familiar comes into exist is through violence. When either the Familiar is slain, and is reborn, or its master is slain, the former Familiar gains a magical protection. This is a sort of cosmic joke, as they likely won’t be able to make use of the protection to its fullest now that they no longer are a Familiar.

A feat (named Clay Familiar) can be taken by a prospective master, allowing them to take a Clay Familiar as a regular Familiar, and thus if they have Improved Familiar and this feat, they can select a Clay Familiar as an Improved Familiar option that is just a non-Improved Familiar with a template, such as an Entropic Clay Familiar, or Celestial Clay Familiar. Alternatively, if they have this feat and Improved Familiar, they can take a regular Clay Familiar, but the Clay Skin spell is upgraded to a Stoneskin spell.

Oh man, I meant to say the DR/Adamantine of the Clay Skin spell (as well as Stoneskin if it is the Improved Familiar version) gets replaced with an equal value of hardness, except Adamantine, and anything that isn’t Adamantine that overcomes DR/Adamantine (such as a high enough enhancement bonus on the weapon), still overcomes it.

This way they have protection against energy damage as well.

Also, if the damage was originally nonlethal damage, then the hardness does get complete protection from it. Only lethal damage isn’t completely reduced, instead being converted to nonlethal damage that the Clay Skin spell doesn’t block.


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Goth Guru wrote:
MrCharisma wrote:

121. Ducks.

Seriously they're not in Pathfinder

EDIT: Oh nevermind, I found them. They're in Equipment for some reason =P

DUCKS

122. Dire ducks, also called geese. Canadian geese are especially vicious.

Vicious but polite!


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157. Razorseed Dandelion

This Huge-sized Dandelion (20ft-28ft tall) produces Ray Florets (seeds) that are 8ft-12ft long and are light as a feather, causing it to be able to send its Ray Florets over long distances. The Ray Florets have razor-sharp barbed hooks that appear like thorns all across its full length, and they attempt to land on animals or humanoids alike, causing lacerations and hooking itself into the victim's skin with its barbs. Once this seed has had its first taste of blood, the seed attempts to wrap around its victim and begin to constrict like a snake. While this is only a minor inconvenience for humanoids and certain animals who can easily free themselves (albeit somewhat painful), some animals are not so lucky, and can indeed die from infection or even sometimes bleed to death from being unable to free themselves; these seeds are especially deadly to quadrupeds like horses, cattle, and dogs, as well as any other animal that lacks the dexterity and opposable thumbs/fingers to peel this constricting seed off of their skin. Once the animal dies or the bloodied seed is removed, the seed then begins its germination process using this blood or carcass as fertilizer, producing another Gargantuan-sized Dandelion. Seeds that are unable to find a victim simply die and produce nothing, as the blood of an animal or humanoid is necessary for germination.

Despite this somewhat horrific germination process, Razorseed Dandelions are still considered by most as a beneficial plant for its many medicinal uses and robust stem as building material. The stem can be hollowed out and used like plumbing, and many villages use this for rain water collection and animal troughs; the stems can also be dried and treated with tar or pitch and used to build homes similar to building a loghouse or even rafts and small fishing vessels. The Root of the Razorseed Dandelion is quite large (120-200lbs) and is easily stored without spoiling for long durations, and it can be chopped up and boiled for making nutritious soups and stews as well as vitamin-rich teas, which aid in the recovery process for those who become sick with anything from the common cold to pneumonia. And its leaves can be minced, boiled, and reduced to a paste for producing topical salves, ointments, and lotions that can help heal wounds and prevent infection, as well as treating a host of rashes, hives, boils, staph infections, scabies, and other skin diseases.

158. Guinea Rhinoceros

This rhino is only about 4-7 lbs. and is no larger than a common feline or a chihuahua when fully-grown. Despite it's tiny size, it packs a powerful punch when it charges with its horn, and when they are in groups they can defend themselves against predators that are 2-3 times their own size with coordinated charging and ramming. There are many colonies of Guinea Rhinos in the wild throughout the world, but the Guinea Rhino is most commonly seen as a house pet. They are herbivores, and typically graze most of their days; they eat grass, tree bark, twigs, stems, leaves, roots, nuts, and low-hanging fruits and vegetables. There are over 20 different species of Guinea Rhinoceros and can be found almost anywhere that doesn't have snow or frozen tundra; some colonies of Guinea Rhinoceros have even been known to be migratory to avoid winter snows, as they absolutely hate snow and ice-- not only are their food sources scarce, but they have poor footing and have trouble defending themselves against predators.


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159. Dandy Lions: big cats, primarily predators living in savannah and jungle biomes, the Dandy Lions are so named because of their curious mating habits, seemingly adapted from peacocks. during mating season the manes and tails of the males exhibit loud, bold, expressive colors that differ wildly from their typically tawny fur color. When trying to attract their mate, the males strut confidently in their garish affectations. The multi-hued fur stands on end during this time in a uniform, static presentation, giving the mane the appearance of the collar or cowl favored by many posh, humanoid races.

160. Sundial Flowers: these flowers have large, open "faces" atop their stems. This open, round area is typically a brilliant yellowish hue and features a long, fixed stamen much like a ramped wedge upon the face. As the flower rotates ever so slightly to position itself for maximum sunlight, while the sun is clearly visible in the sky the stamen generates a distinct shadow based on the time of day and positioning of the sun. Some rangers, druids and outdoor types use these flowers to tell approximate time during the day.


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161. Mammoth Narwhal Ray

This larger-than-Colossal-sized creature is like a mix between a Narwhal and a Manta Ray, and it dwells in the deepest depths of the ocean for a majority of its life. Like Narwhals, this creature must come up to the surface for air, but its lungs have the unique property of being able to mix oxygen and water into a "breathable gel-like liquid" as it dives, and remarkably, this allows it to hold its breathe for over a month at a time. This "breathable liquid" also prevents their lungs from being crushed from the immense pressures while it dives to the deepest zones of the ocean where it primarily hunts for food: the Abyssopelagic and Hadopelagic zones. The Mammoth Narwhal Ray primarily feeds on planktonic organisms such as euphausiids (Krill), copepods, mysids, decapod larvae, and shrimp, but some great thinkers and researchers have noted their consumption of small and moderately sized fish as well during their autopsies. Not many of these autopsies have been performed though, so much of this creature's habits remain a mystery. But, whenever one of these dead creatures wash up on a beach once every 10-20 years or so, this provides great thinkers and researchers with such opportunities to learn more about this majestic creature.

The Mammoth Narwhal Ray is 60-70ft long when fully grown, but its wingspan is usually over two times that amount, coming in at a whopping 130-155ft wide. While these creatures pose no real threat to humanoids, typically ignoring them unless attacked or if their young becomes threatened, they can be quite dangerous to hunt, as they have a 9-12ft long venomous stinger on their tail and a 20-25ft horn they can ram your ship with. There are some oceanic clans of humanoids who hunt them for ivory, food, bone, and blubber; they typically hunt them when they come up for air or to mate, and then use harpoons tied to air-inflated-buoys as to fatigue the creature as it attempts to dive. This is dangerous business because it's not uncommon for one of these creatures to destroy an entire fleet of ships in desperation and defense of its own life. Additionally, these creatures are quite social and the rest of their Pod will come to their aid if attacked as well.

Unlike their smaller Manta Ray cousins, these Mammoth Narwhal Rays take more after their whale cousins when it comes to social aspects. Mammoth Narwhal Rays usually live in Pods of 15-20 Rays, but the highest ever recorded was estimated to be around 100 Rays.

162. Assassin's Rose

This rose is exactly similar to any other common rose, except it is aphoticly black, and grows deep in the underdark. It cannot grow if it is within a mile of any light source, even within a mile from other luminescent underdark flora. This rose received it's name as "The Assassin's Rose" because of a world-wide incident nearly 150 years ago, where an assassin killed 12 great Kings and Emperors in 12 separate kingdoms on the first day of every month for an entire year, and the assassin would leave this aphoticly dark rose on the corpse. In each of the cases of the 12 victims, the rose's thorny stem was always clutched by the victim's left hand, and posed in such a way as if the victim was "smelling" the rose. Each of the victims had no lacerations on their skin, no poison or disease in their system, and despite the combined efforts of great thinkers from 12 kingdoms, no cause of death could be ascertained. The year-long incident received world-wide notoriety and was never solved.

Prior to being given the name of "Assassin's Rose", it was known as a common Black Rose or an Underdark Rose.

Dark Archive

Mark Hoover 330 wrote:
159. Dandy Lions: big cats, primarily predators living in savannah and jungle biomes, the Dandy Lions are so named because of their curious mating habits, seemingly adapted from peacocks. during mating season the manes and tails of the males exhibit loud, bold, expressive colors that differ wildly from their typically tawny fur color. When trying to attract their mate, the males strut confidently in their garish affectations. The multi-hued fur stands on end during this time in a uniform, static presentation, giving the mane the appearance of the collar or cowl favored by many posh, humanoid races.

Love this one. All the different animal hybrid mashups like Griffons or Hippocampi or Owlbears, a lion with a peacock-like mane sounds visually awesome.


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163. Cardmen

A form of large (not Large) ant that collects thin, stiff material for its colonies, and carries the pieces vertically. They can be trained a little and a line of them carrying playing cards is one of the sideshows at The Superb Peripatetic Carnival.

Speaker for the Dead wrote:
Goth Guru wrote:
MrCharisma wrote:

121. Ducks.

Seriously they're not in Pathfinder

EDIT: Oh nevermind, I found them. They're in Equipment for some reason =P

DUCKS

122. Dire ducks, also called geese. Canadian geese are especially vicious.
Vicious but polite!

I think you may have no experience with geese Canadian or otherwise.


When Canadian Geese flocked near the mall, I couldn't use that entrance for months. Some car ran one over and they moved away.


I believe the joke is that, as they are Canadian, they are polite.

In Pathfinder, geese have a special ability that grants them +1 to Intimidate per HD of their target. And they are immune to fear.
I've seen footage of them trying to take on gorillas, elephants and even cars.


Quixote wrote:
I've seen footage of them trying to take on gorillas, elephants and even cars.

Intimidation in real life is actually quite effective, which is why so many creatures rely on it.


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My dad started a Car Repair/Transmission shop out of our garage when I was a young kid, and we lived on a farm with a pond, and Canadian Geese would come land in the pond and do their bathing thing. Anywho, one day, one of these geese came up from the pond and fell in love with his own reflection in the hubcaps of one of my dad's customer's cars, and the goose obviously thought that it was his mate for life or something, because any time someone went near the customer's car, the goose would attack them. So my youngest brother got too close to this goose one time and it attacked him, but he got away, so then my mom tried to shoo this goose away with a broom and it was to no avail. My mom was taking on this enraged goose jumping and flapping its wings going "HONK! HONK! HOOOOOONK!" and feathers were flying everywhere while she's swatting it with a broom. Mom eventually gave up, and it got so bad that my dad had to get his shotgun and shoot it.

TLDR; Canadian Geese are devil spawn and you can't convince me otherwise #survivor


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164. Tuskiloxodon

This huge-sized creature resembles an Elephant, but it has 6 tusks protruding from the sides of its mouth and has a skull structure with spiral-shaped horns similar to a ram. While these creatures are quite docile in the wild-- only being confrontational when cornered or threatened-- some tribes have domesticated these creatures to be bred for war, and treat them cruelly from infancy to make them unnaturally aggressive and fearless. On the battlefield, they ride these creatures to stampede and gore their enemies. Tuskiloxodons eat roots, grasses, fruit, vegetables, and various tree barks, and can consume up to 300 pounds of food in a single day.

165. Dire Tuskiloxodon

See Tuskiloxodon, except Colossal-sized. Dire Tuskiloxodons also eat roots, grasses, fruit, vegetables, and various tree barks like their smaller kin, but can consume up to 1500 pounds of food in a single day.

166. Hahuraneura

This insect is much like a common dragonfly, except you'd need a tennis racket to swat it because its wingspan is 2 to 2.5 feet wide. It has a small mouth and razor sharp teeth, but thankfully this insect poses no threat to humans because its mouth is so small, and it prefers to prey upon smaller insects and arachnids.

167. Ankhroot

Ankhroot is an appropriately named herb for both its shape and medicinal properties. This herb grows approximately 3ft tall and resembles the shape of an Egyptian Ankh (with two of its 4 stems growing connected like a top loop), and can be administered as both a corpse-restoring salve as well as a reagent for Cure potions. Without preparing it in any way, one can also eat this herb raw, and doing so will double a creature's natural healing for 3 days. If one boils the entirety (root and stems) of this plant down to a paste and applies it as a salve to a corpse's skin from head to toe, it won't restore life to the corpse per se, but it will restore the corpse in such a way as to allow someone to cast Resurrection spells on the corpse as if it had died less than 3 seconds ago. Ankhroots are extremely rare in the wild, but they are most commonly found in the personal gardens of Clerics, who have particularly been known to keep these herbs and sell them to others for small fortunes.


167. Ankhroot salve is the base for raise dead salve. Clerics of Eris like to label this as speak with dead lotion as a joke.


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167. Maybe Ankhroot could be used instead of a 5,000gp diamond for Raise Dead? They're probably worth the same on the black market.

168. Canker Fly

Canker flies are among one of the worst plague-bearing insects in all of the world. They're somewhat large compared to other flies; they're roughly 35-40mm long and have a painful bite. They live up to their name of "Canker" for the purulent, blistering boils and pustules that appear on the skin after receiving a bite from one of these flies. This fly's cytotoxic saliva gets under the skin and causes suppuration for 5-7 days, but the real danger lies in whatever diseases/pathogens from creatures they've previously bitten become transferred to whomever they bite in the future. The boils aren't especially painful, but they are prone to infection because the wound suppurates constantly. In some rare cases where the pus starts filling up underneath the skin, doctors have had to pull a victim's skin away from the muscle in order to stuff gauze, cotton, or mesh linen to wick all the pus out. However the suppurating wound is only half the battle, because victims often die to blood poisoning from whatever disease and pathogens they received from the Canker Fly.

This Canker Fly is such a nuisance that people have banded together to form "hunting parties" to obliterate them at their source, which is usually a rotting carcass of an animal, before they can cause too much damage.


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169. Sonance Snake

This blind and deaf, venomous constrictor snake has a unique way in which it both detects and kills its prey. The Sonance Snake cannot see or hear, but rather it has a heightened somatosensory nervous system that detects its prey via thermal and pain nociception, as well as sound waves via echolocation, which then become absorbed by its skin and analyzed by its nervous system. It has both Blindsense (via Echolocation) to 120ft, as well as Lifesense (Thermal and Pain Nociception) to 60ft. As far as killing its prey, it almost always attempts to ambush its prey from a tree branch and then attempts to wrap and constrict its prey, but then it bites them several times with its hemotoxic venom (causing both necrosis of the skin and coagulopathy of the blood), which prevents the victim's blood from forming clots, and causes the victim to have uncontrolled internal or external bleeding while the constriction process ruptures blood vessels and vital organs. Sonance Snakes have also been witnessed ambushing wounded animals that are clearly in pain, and it will abandon it's tree branch and then slither across the ground to attack its wounded victim.

The Sonance Snake's thermal receptors and echolocation are both its strength and weakness, however, because high heat and bursts of loud noises (such as clapping or shouting) cause it to be frightened; it "sees" something much larger than itself and flees. Thunderstones and other exceptionally loud sources paralyze this snake immediately (1d4 rounds, No Save). Just like causing sudden bursts of noise, excessive heat sources also cause this snake to "see" something much larger than itself and flees, such as lit torches or spells which can create heat sources higher than 100 degrees (or any temperature that is higher than the body heat of its prey).

This muscular snake is one of the longest and heaviest non-dire snakes, averaging around 12-17ft long and weighing between 80-120lbs. The venom from this snake is not usually fatal to adult humanoids, but it is particularly deadly to its prey, which is usually a death sentence to anything under 50-60 lbs, who will usually die within 45 minutes (without receiving an antidote) even without the constriction.


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169. The venom is only useful to make weapon poison. It gives the coated weapon the bleed quality. Because of it's effect on skin, it's useless medicinally. Only the lower planes would send one as a familiar, but it would share it's blind sense with it's owner.


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170. Eucalyptus Slayer Vines

Despite the name, these vines do not actually "slay" anything, except for other plants. Slayer Vines are actually a legume, but the wide, trifoliate leaves on its vine grow so densely and the vine itself spreads (usually smothering other plants) so quickly, that it suffocates and overwhelms other plants from receiving sunlight. Similarly to color-patterns seen on Eucalyptus trees, it has a rainbow-like pattern on its vines, and it has perennial flower that blooms every Spring for approximately 3 months that shares this rainbow-coloring pattern. Under ideal conditions, Slayer Vines have been known to grow over 1 meter in a single 24 hour period, and even 6-12 inches in 24 hours in non-ideal conditions.

This plant is largely considered to be a malignant pest of a plant, as it is nearly impossible to kill completely, and kills all other plants in its path. It grows so fast as to cover entire homes and structures in only a couple of days. It has also covered many civilizations that are in ruins in a think blanket of leafy vines.

Also known as "Apocalypse Vines" (because many people believe it's the only thing that will survive a Scorched Earth Apocalypse scenario), these Slayer Vines are nearly impossible to kill due to their excessive growth rate, rapid reproduction rate, and their hard-coated seeds are able to remain alive and viable for years, and they're resistant to seemingly everything under the sun. Slayer Vine Seeds are even known to survive forest fires and even surviving the digestion process of animals who eat them and defecate the seeds out later, which causes them to grow in a new area. So even if this vine is encroaching upon your home, and you obliterate it with several well-placed Fireballs, its impervious seeds will survive and germinate, and the vine will encroaching once again in a week or so. The only way to truly be rid of this pest of a plant is to burn it entirely, and then crush every seed in the area with a hammer, and then hope that you found them all.

The sole redeeming quality of this plant, as far as some humanoids are concerned, is that every part of this plant is edible. So there are some farmers who allow their livestock to graze in fields of this fast-growing plant. Some have even domesticated this plant; through rigorous daily-containment practices, farmers can use Eucalyptus Slayer Vines to feed their animals without the danger of this vine running rampant. Animal breeders who domesticate Tuskiloxodons and their Dire cousins call this vine a "gift from the gods". Some regions even use these leaves to enjoy in salads and garnishes.


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171. Gillslayer Eels

Perhaps a mutation from prolonged exposure to ancient Aboleths, these creatures are not true eels, in the same sense that electric eels are not true eels. These curious fish however hunt through a combination of chemical discharge and constriction. When a Gillslayer Eel successfully coils around a potential prey they breathe out a cloud into the face and breathing organs of its prey, transforming the prey animal temporarily into an air-breathing creature. In this way, Gillslayer Eels effectively grapple and drown their prey, even as they predate on small fish along muddy shorelines. Some freshwater species have also been discovered. Typically they burrow into silt or sand to avoid larger predators or to search for bottom feeders.


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172. Bladdervine

Bladdervines evolved to have the unique property to live without having a root system; instead, they engorge and inflate themselves with water as a long-term survival mechanism to survive in dry and arid climates, or during times of drought. These bladders do not recede after expanding, so if this vine doesn't get the adequate water it needs, it will fill itself with a mixture of gaseous ammonia, helium, neon, methane, and naturally-occurring dicarbon dihydride air, and begin to float and be carried with the wind in hopes of migrating to an adequate home.

While this gaseous mixture does contain methane, it does not contain enough to make this gaseous mixture flammable; rather, the methane acts as a bonding/healing agent for the bladder in the event that it tears open. Likewise, the ammonia is only present for an irritant to animals that attempt to use these bladders as a snack.

It is not uncommon for several Bladdervines working in unison to pick up entire chunks of earth and rock and carry it with them in their migrations. Bladdervines do not die from old age, but only die from lack of water, so some of the most ancient Bladdervine systems are large enough to carry rock and earth formations that are the size of mountains; great thinkers and researchers have observed these strange formations over the course of several decades, and they appear to "bounce" off the earth and then float back up. Some of these larger, ancient formations have even developed their own three-stage precipitation weather systems and stay permanently nestled amongst the clouds.

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