1001 Inconsequential Flora & Fauna


Homebrew and House Rules

51 to 100 of 523 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

5 people marked this as a favorite.

55. Aboleth Worms: A type of tube worm that grows on and nearby the lairs of deep sea aboleths, feeding on a mixture of the arcane energy and the slime secreted by these ancient aberrations. Aboleth worms can grow up to a meter in height, and aboleths without retainers to clean them—or without an interest in doing so—can actually become covered in the harmless things. The sight of an aboleth is horrendous enough, but one covered in seemingly parasitic growths, florescent blue plumes casting fell light over their host, can be truly terrifying. Aboleth worms are edible, but taste extremely waxy.

56. Ronin Wasps: Sometimes, the effects of magical pollution on an environment are more subtle than five-legged dragons or enormous glowing oozes. When eusocial vermin are exposed to certain types of magical corruption, it can be devastating to the hive. Ronin wasps are lone wasps that survive the effects. No longer possessing any ties to a nest, ronin wasps—glittering oversized green and yellow insects that tend to have more compound eyes and wings than they aught—are known to attack other wasp nests, devouring anything of their own kind they can reach. Nests and hives confronted with the threat of a ronin wasp tend to be speedily destroyed, as their stingers generally cannot penetrate the magically hardened shell. Ronin wasps behave as if rabid around other animals, biting and stinging with total abandon. Their stings can cause mild, but unpleasant hallucinations.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

57. Bubble Crabs: A rather large crab that blows large, harmless bubbles when on a beach at sunrise or sunset. They were made by a wizard that was getting bored of the view outside of her tower and wanted a prettier beach.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

58. Fancy Fox:This fox is known by it's large pointed ears, perfectly pointed snout, large eyes, red and violet patterned fur, long legs, and utter visual perfection. It eats all kinds of vermin, birds, and fish. Any creature that sees one must will save DC18 or be held by wonder. If a second save is failed they become charmed for 2D6 days. They glow in the dark so they can hunt at night. As a familiar they +2 a wizard's charisma, but many aristocrats and artists keep them like pets. They also like fruit, but feeding them wine leads to a population explosion among their kind. Because of their power they can quickly displace all other predators. Mindless creatures such as oozes are their nemesis, but wealthy patrons will often hire adventurers to "destroy the disgusting oozes and save my beautiful foxes."

Also known as fantasy foxes or fantastic foxes, they are otherwise ordinary foxes. They otherwise have the stats of small dogs. Bards dispute what wizard or deity created them.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

The Bald Beaver:

The bald beaver is type of rodent that is about 3' long, including the tail, and ranges from 20 to 40 lbs. It's body's coloration ranges from light brown to black. The fur on it's head on the other hand is always white which gave it it's name.

It's most interesting parts are wings with a 3 foot wing spread. A large flat tail, that can make a surprisingly loud noise when slapped against water. A set of long claws on it's front feet to allow it to catch fish and carrying logs. And finally two large front teeth in it's mouth that it uses to cut down trees.

It's habitat is the mouth of rivers that proceeds to dam partially so that it can build it's lodge and create a primitive fish weir. While an omnivore the only meat it will hunt for is fish.

It's origins lies with a wizard trying to end a feud between to nations. Important note, if you come across a family carrying a log back to their dam do not startle them. Their natural instinct is to drop the log on the on what ever is threatening them.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

59. Dyer Unicorns
These look almost like regular unicorns, but have rainbow-colored manes, tails, and 'feathers' around their hooves. They also tend to sparkle. They like nothing better than to make things more colorful. Many an adventurer has awoken in the morning to find their gear suddenly bright and clean-looking. The effects usually fade after a few days, but there have been cases where the newly colorful gear is permanent. They always have a +6 bonus to appraise any form of painted art.

60. Glow moss
Found in underground places of all varieties, this moss has the relative luminescence of a torch in small clumps, but can be brighter in larger clumps. It primarily attracts insects, which it captures and eats but also serves to provide illumination for any race that doesn't have low light or dark vision. It doesn't fare well above ground, but will cling to torches and doesn't need much maintenance other than keeping it in dark places with a goodly supply of insects.

61. Vampire Plants
A well-known phenomena: any fruit or vegetable left in a field or orchard unharvested for ten days past when it is ripe will turn "vampiric". They are easy to distinguish from regular fruits and vegetables by the blood-like markings around the rind and shriveled appearance. Lacking teeth, they can only attack by hurling themselves at an opponent in hopes of bludgeoning it to death. Most, once they actually hit a target, squish on impact and are effectively dead (larger and harder fruits and vegetables can do much more damage and at least one unfortunate farmer is known to have been killed by a pack of vampiric watermelons). They will remain mobile until the next full moon (at least a month after the time of their 'turning'), after which time they decompose completely. Their remains make very effective fertilizer and act as if the enrichment version of the plant growthspell had been cast on the area (just to be safe, most farmers burn the remains and mix the ashes with the soil, but they decompose normally otherwise). If the plants actually kill anyone, the area near the body(s) additionally act as if the overgrowth version had also been cast. While they can be eaten they are completely flavorless and dry and have no nutritional value.

Since only is known to happen to cultivated fruits and vegetables (wild varieties have been reported but never confirmed), it is thought that vampiric vegetables are the curse of some agricultural deity who both despised waste and wanted to be sure farmers did their duties in a timely manner.


tresson wrote:

59.The Bald Beaver:

The bald beaver is type of rodent that is about 3' long, including the tail, and ranges from 20 to 40 lbs. It's body's coloration ranges from light brown to black. The fur on it's head on the other hand is always white which gave it it's name.

It's most interesting parts are wings with a 3 foot wing spread. A large flat tail, that can make a surprisingly loud noise when slapped against water. A set of long claws on it's front feet to allow it to catch fish and carrying logs. And finally two large front teeth in it's mouth that it uses to cut down trees.

It's habitat is the mouth of rivers that proceeds to dam partially so that it can build it's lodge and create a primitive fish weir. While an omnivore the only meat it will hunt for is fish.

It's origins lies with a wizard trying to end a feud between to nations. Important note, if you come across a family carrying a log back to their dam do not startle them. Their natural instinct is to drop the log on the on what ever is threatening them.

The numbering police were here!


Indagare wrote:

60. Dyer Unicorns

These look almost like regular unicorns, but have rainbow-colored manes, tails, and 'feathers' around their hooves. They also tend to sparkle. They like nothing better than to make things more colorful. Many an adventurer has awoken in the morning to find their gear suddenly bright and clean-looking. The effects usually fade after a few days, but there have been cases where the newly colorful gear is permanent. They always have a +6 bonus to appraise any form of painted art.

61. Glow moss
Found in underground places of all varieties, this moss has the relative luminescence of a torch in small clumps, but can be brighter in larger clumps. It primarily attracts insects, which it captures and eats but also serves to provide illumination for any race that doesn't have low light or dark vision. It doesn't fare well above ground, but will cling to torches and doesn't need much maintenance other than keeping it in dark places with a goodly supply of insects.

62. Vampire Plants
A well-known phenomena: any fruit or vegetable left in a field or orchard unharvested for ten days past when it is ripe will turn "vampiric". They are easy to distinguish from regular fruits and vegetables by the blood-like markings around the rind and shriveled appearance. Lacking teeth, they can only attack by hurling themselves at an opponent in hopes of bludgeoning it to death. Most, once they actually hit a target, squish on impact and are effectively dead (larger and harder fruits and vegetables can do much more damage and at least one unfortunate farmer is known to have been killed by a pack of vampiric watermelons). They will remain mobile until the next full moon (at least a month after the time of their 'turning'), after which time they decompose completely. Their remains make very effective fertilizer and act as if the enrichment version of the plant growthspell had been cast on the area (just to be safe, most farmers burn the remains and mix the ashes with the soil, but they...

but they decompose normally otherwise). If the plants actually kill anyone, the area near the body(s) additionally act as if the overgrowth version had also been cast. While they can be eaten they are completely flavorless and dry and have no nutritional value.

Since only is known to happen to cultivated fruits and vegetables (wild varieties have been reported but never confirmed), it is thought that vampiric vegetables are the curse of some agricultural deity who both despised waste and wanted to be sure farmers did their duties in a timely manner.


Indagare wrote:
59. Dyer Unicorns

At first I read this as "Dryer Unicorns and was trying to figure out if they were some reference to a dryer sheet commercial.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
SilvercatMoonpaw wrote:
Indagare wrote:
59. Dyer Unicorns
At first I read this as "Dryer Unicorns and was trying to figure out if they were some reference to a dryer sheet commercial.

No, Dryer Unicorns are the bane of brewers everywhere: they turn wine into water and beer into lemonade.


Indagare wrote:
SilvercatMoonpaw wrote:
Indagare wrote:
59. Dyer Unicorns
At first I read this as "Dryer Unicorns and was trying to figure out if they were some reference to a dryer sheet commercial.
No, Dryer Unicorns are the bane of brewers everywhere: they turn wine into water and beer into lemonade.

On the other hand, making a cloak from the Dryer Unicorns fur means a cloak that no liquid can ever soak. Backpacks made from their tanned leather never suffer from leaks. Put your spellbook inside, it can never get wet!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

63. Elder star Edelweis
These mountain growing flowers have 5 pointed blooms. The old ones are somewhat allergic to them. A tea made from the leaves by a herbalist will restore 1D6 sanity points. Frequent drinkers of the tea claim the Old Ones are just monsters with the insanity spell as a supernatural ability. Rumor has it that a renegade group of semi human Deep Ones are living in a mountain village farming the flowers.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Something I'm about to use tomorrow (the meleers need some alchemist's fire-equivalents):

64. Silkwyrms: A type of silkworm "cleverly" named for its tendency to spit tiny globs of fire to ward off spiders and other attackers, not unlike the bombardier beetle. The "firesacs" silkwyrms create are not unlike silkworm nests, but highly flammable, a further deterrent against hungry birds. Silkwyrms have been rendered mostly extinct, however, thanks to humanoids realizing how useful a firesac can be: Firesacs function identically to acid flasks, but they deal fire damage, and have a 10% chance to set their target ablaze. Harvesting them safely requires a DC 15 Survival check, however, and storing them long-term tends to end poorly. The larval stage is trouble, of course, but the silkwyrm's final form is a whole lot worse.


5 people marked this as a favorite.

65. Forest urchin. This plant resembles your basic sea urchin, spreading out up to six inches in diameter. Despite resembling a form of sea life, it truly is a plant. If a creature brushes against it, the spines break off as an urchin's do. Against a creature with any toughness to its hide (natural armor of +1 or better, armor bonus of +1 or better), this is ineffective. But the plant has an additional defense. The spines are filled with a fluid that irritates the skin, causing a serious rash similar to poison ivy. Creatures must make a DC 13 Fortitude save or suffer a rash that inflicts a -2 Dexterity penalty for 1d4 days, and natural armor is no protection from it (actual armor still works). Strangely, the plant is eaten by any number of insects (chitinous exoskeletons provide complete protection) and is highly nutritious to them. Certain species of ants even live under and within the plant itself in a symbiotic relationship.

66. Butterfly bush. Unlike the real-world shrub, this plant is a low-growing bush, normally topping out at about four feet in height and found from subtropical to subarctic environments. This bush is named because the plant's leaves grow to resemble whatever species of butterfly pollinated it. For example, if pollinated by a tiger swallowtail, the plant's leaves are black and yellow; a monarch generates orange and black. Botanists have seen bushes with dozens of colors in more active patches and fey creatures tend to cultivate them for that reason.

Shadow Lodge

3 people marked this as a favorite.

67. Meat Apple. This small apple tree appears unremarkable, but biting into one reveals a meaty flesh similar to rare beef. The plant requires levels of iron in the soil which would be toxic to most plants. Cultivation requires careful fertilization, and a DC 18 Profession (Gardener) check.

Silver Crusade

4 people marked this as a favorite.

68. Shundarha Cane: Found in humid regions, Shundarha's pink-colored canes grow up to 15 feet high. It is typically farmed in three fields; one to harvest the small shoots (which taste like honey when eaten), one for the medium shoots (turned into animal feed), and one for the largest shoots (which, while too tough to be eaten, make an excellent building material.) Curiously, "Shundarha" is also Ignan for "Desolation." No one has been able to determine if this is just coincidence.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

69. Metal rice: The husk around the grain consists of mostly metal leeched from the soil and water. Once this property was discovered in the runoff from an iron mine, they were immediately planted in tailings from gold mines. When the immediate soil and water run out of metals, the grains become defenseless against vermin and growing them elsewhere becomes advisable. Particularly dangerous mines, some people just redirect waterways through them and plant metal rice.


70. BoogerBear: While possessing all the attributes of the common bugbear, this rare sub-species has protent allergies. It is highly allergic to its favorite prey (humans) and suffers a -2 to attack due to severe sneezing if within 10 feet of one. If it injests human flesh it must make a DC 16 Fortitude save or die.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

71. Corby of Ill Omen: Related to both ravens and crows, this bird has a distinctive cry. It can say "Doom!" and nothing else. The expression, "Kill two birds with one stone" may be inspired by this bird. They say that Dire Corbies are sent by nature gods to punish humans for killing Corbies, but that doesn't stop the hunt at all. Recently, goths and vampires have started keeping them as pets. Parties of murder hobos like the bird to announce them. If there was any doubt that Doom has arrived...


3 people marked this as a favorite.

72. Corby: This subterranean predator has been cited by some as the "missing link" between birds and mammals, though most dispute that notion as being absurd (not least because people were created by gods' spilled blood and things like that, not evolution). Corbies resemble a mix between a monkey and a crow, possessing oily black feathers, muscular forearms tipped with deadly claws, a sharp crow-like beak, and a terrifying knack for jumping and climbing.

Fortunately, they are only the size of capuchin monkeys, and only prey on small vermin. On the surface, or in svirfneblin communities, they are often kept as "exotic" pets or familiars (treat as cats, but with a +8 to jumping-related Acrobatics checks and no bite attack, granting as a familiar a +3 bonus to Acrobatics checks). Though their loud nighttime "screeching sessions" and extremely territorial behavior towards other corbies can make them difficult pets and familiars to keep, they tend to be quite friendly and easy to tame.

Their dire counterpart, on the other hand...


2 people marked this as a favorite.

73. Guinea Lion - products of similar experiments that produced owlbears. These herbivores are largely harmless if given a wide berth, but their predator like build makes them very capable of defending themselves. They develop a home territory in small packs, preferring hilly out mountainous terrain. While moderately tamable and trainable, they make poor mounts over extended periods. They use the overland speed of a creature with 20' movement, regardless of any modifiers to their speed.


Irontruth wrote:
73. Guinea Lion - products of similar experiments that produced owlbears. These herbivores are largely harmless if given a wide berth, but their predator like build makes them very capable of defending themselves. They develop a home territory in small packs, preferring hilly out mountainous terrain. While moderately tamable and trainable, they make poor mounts over extended periods. They use the overland speed of a creature with 20' movement, regardless of any modifiers to their speed.

They can possibly be ranched like cattle. Particularly nasty "bulls" can be used in Guineabullfights, in arenas. :)

Shadow Lodge

4 people marked this as a favorite.

74. Nymph's Wort. Tea made from the leaves of this unremarkable herb causes mild, pleasant hallucinations lasting approximately one hour. However, excessive consumption of this tea can cause blindness.

75. Peacock Ivy. The leaves of this vine are iridescent and patterned in a way that resembles peacock feathers. The ivy is popular as a component in bouquets - where it symbolizes beauty if arranged among the other plants and jealousy if wrapped around them - and wreaths, where it symbolizes watchfulness. As a product of magical breeding, Peacock Ivy is very fragile. It is almost never found in the wild and requires a DC 20 Profession (Gardener) check to cultivate.


My first instinct with the Guinea Lion was to critique a predator's build on an herbivore. Predator builds are biologically expensive. There's a reason they eat meat. Also, lions can leap, so how do you expect to ranch them? You'd need huge fences, or a ceiling. This guinea lion idea is sooooo unrealistic.


I thought you got that from Odd Squad but here's where it started.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2448571/Hilarious-Frankenstein-styl e-creatures-photos-ordinary-animals-morphed-together.html

How does any Chimera live? Because, magic.

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.

75. Sifter Fleas Sifter Fleas are small insects that have established a symbiotic relationship with mammals. The fleas comb through the hair of their hosts, cleaning and grooming it, taking the filth away as either food or a building material. Many upper-class salons feature a "Flea Room," essentially a circle of chairs with a Sifter Flea nest in the center.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

76. Dawn Monocle: This light-green, leafy plant grows in arid conditions and grasslands. It has a beautifully-distinctive white flower that blooms into a ring-shape instead of a blossom.

The flower's petals trap and catch morning dew in the perfect composition to function as a magnifying glass during the early morning hours. Before the dew is absorbed by the plant, peering through it cna grant a +2 bonus to Appraise checks or to checks to identify any creatures lurking around the base of the plant, typically ants or other insects. Attempting to move or harvest the flower invariably disrupts the dewdrop, thus making it a more or less stationary appraisal aid.

This flower has also been known to be the cause of several small wildfires if it blooms around dead or dried grass and the morning sunlight happens to strike the dewdrop just right.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Kobold Cleaver wrote:
My first instinct with the Guinea Lion was to critique a predator's build on an herbivore. Predator builds are biologically expensive. There's a reason they eat meat. Also, lions can leap, so how do you expect to ranch them? You'd need huge fences, or a ceiling. This guinea lion idea is sooooo unrealistic.

Most likely by acclimating them to human contact and providing a steady food source. Cause you're right, they'd have to be voracious herbivores, which is what inspired the long distance movement penalty. They have to spend so much time eating they can't exist in large packs, nor can they travel far in a single day.

But remember, they aren't the result of evolution, but rather magical experimentation.

Also, I want a sharkhorse.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

77. Cacid. This cactus stands approximately eight feet tall and branches out, similar in appearance to the classic saguaro. It grows in particularly saline soils in the desert. In addition to the spines that cacti normally use as defense against herbivory, this plant has developed a secondary defense against more persistent attack. It stores not water within its stem, but acid derived from biological processes. This acid is used to neutralize the alkaline soil around its roots and as its water reservoir. As most creatures cannot drink strong acid, this allows the cacid to retain its water supplies against desert herbivores. The plant drips acid through its roots, which creates water that it can then absorb. The acid is potent enough to be of use if harvested carefully and if stored in a flask is equal to a normal flask of acid. Of course, stories also tell of adventurers who managed to puncture their flasks on its spines and promptly douse themselves in that acid....


2 people marked this as a favorite.

78. Ettercap Spider: This little thumb-sized purple arachnid is thought to be a distant ancestor of the ettercap, or perhaps the creation of a wicked ettercap druid. Ettercap spiders keep to forests, though they avoid actual ettercaps' territory—ettercaps apparently find their "ancestors" quite tasty. Unlike most spiders, ettercap spiders are very social, and group in pairs or clusters. They have therefore become very popular with certain gnome farmers, who use them to produce a strong but very fine silk used in garments and sometimes armor.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

79. Imago. This is a relative of the common pitcher plant. Found in wetlands known for their magical histories as well as the foulest smelling marshes, this 1' tall plant resembles a green vase. The plant collects water with its leaves (which form the vase) and this water smells mildly of mint. To insects, it is a powerful attractant. Insects fall into the water in a narcotic stupor, drown, and are dissolved. If a humanoid drinks the water, the chemicals induce mild hallucinations and drowsiness (-1 to Perception checks and saves against sleep effects). If the water is instead used as an additional component for certain divinatory spells, those spells are more effect. Spells such as augury or divination that have a percentage chance of success see that chance increased by 5%. The casting time of a legend lore spell is reduced by 50%. When used as a material component, the water has no effect on the caster.

80. Fizzflower. Another pitcher plant relative, this plant's flowers when in bloom are small and pale white in color, resembling the common daisy. If the flower is dropped into the water within the pitcher, it causes an effervescent reaction. Drinking this concoction removes the effects of a hangover immediately as well as the sickened condition. Nauseated is reduced to sickened, though further doses will have no effect at that time. Unfortunately, fizzflower is unable to be cultivated so far and is only found in certain saltwater marshes. Drinking the water without adding the flower has no effect (and tastes bad). Removing the water from the vase causes it to lose its potency within an hour.

81.Horse pitcher. Yet another pitcher plant relative, this species is native to tropical rain forests. It grows to 4' in height and works similarly to the imago above. However, the chemicals within the pitcher do not affect humanoids as drugs. Instead, the waters of the plant will negate fatigue or reduce exhaustion in animals or humanoids that drink it. Wounded animals are known to temporarily lair near these plants as regular imbibings double the natural healing rate (but not regeneration or fast healing). It gains its name from the explorer Gasto Varx, who saw his horse drink from the plant after a long day's hike through the rain forest.

82. Celestial trapflower. This plant is reputed to have originated in Heaven, growing in the water garden of an empyreal lord. The flowers are a large and showy, golden yellow in color, and always dripping wet. If the plant is damaged, the petals of the flower snap closed and it sprays a stream of water at whatever is damaging it. The flowers grow all over the plant, causing the target to be soaked. It bears its name because the water is not just pure, but actual holy water! As such, the plant only grows in waters under the effect of a consecrate spell on the material plane. The plant holds enough holy water to serve as one vial and requires a week to rebuild its supply. Evil creatures have been known to lob torches at the plant when they see it.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

83.Insidious Bush. This bush is made of many independent stalks clustered together. When the black and blood red flower petals fall, it starts radiating evil. If a well meaning paladin tries to torch it, it seems to burn, but shoots off seeds that travel about 10 feet. They not only set fire to adjacent plants, but quickly take root. If a wildfire starts, the runners spread out into now vacant areas and also start new plants. It usually blooms at the beginning of the dry season, or late summer, whichever comes first.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

84. Half-Celestial Trapflower.
When the Celestial Trapflower was introduced to the Material Plane, horticulturists and others tried to breed a strain that was not restricted to consecrated ground and ponds. This hybrid off-shoot is the product of cross-pollination between the Celestial Trapflower and a Giant Sunflower. The Half-Celestial Trapflower shares the large, golden flower petals of both its parent plants while being able to grow in fertile soils that are merely damp or regularly watered. While the petals maintain the moist, wet appearance of the Celestial Trapflower, it has no properties similar to holy water. However, if the petals are crushed and rubbed, powdered, or applied to a melee weapon, the next successful attack bypasses DR/evil.

Another property of this flower is that it gains the equivalent of DR 5/magic or hardness 5 bypassed by magic (whichever would apply) once it reaches maturity, a fact that infuriates most gardeners and groundskeepers who have to continually resharpen their shears and trimmers.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

85. Lover's Head Mushroom
A rather phallic fungal phenomenon (alliteration! I can't help it!), this inherently magical growth is a potent sexual aid when dried, ground, and boiled into a swallowed paste; and a primary ingredient in love potions.
To grow it, a holly tree must have mint growing within ten paces of the circle defined by the limbs, and at least five instances of sexual activity must have taken place within 50 paces of it over the last season (animal mating counts). Many a village nymphomaniac has turned herbalist after accidentally growing these. However, if the holly has ivy growing on the trunk, any love potions made from the mushrooms that grow under it will instead use dreams, directed intuition, and physical urges to push the imbiber into a quest that leads them to their true love.

86. Geode Oyster
This giant (3-5 feet across the broadest point) oyster prefers to settle in ocean areas where magical residue and power abounds. So named for the brilliant crystalline growths that form on the outer shell (which make great focusing components for wands), the true prize are the pearls they form: rainbow hued spheres of physically bound magic. So far, no wizard has found a spell or magic item that couldn't use these pearls in some form. Spellcasters are the most common farmers of these, often spending an entire days worth of spells to feed them.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

87. Seagrass
This wheat-like plant is a deep blue-green color and is both slightly translucent and reflective. As the wind blows, it shimmers and shines. When in large fields, it is frequently mistaken for deep water. Seagrass is a valuable trade commodity, for a number of reasons. It's stalks can be treated to create a very soft thread similar to silk in feel, but retain the jewel-like nature of the grass. Seagrass can also be ground into flour, which makes incredibly high-quality and delicious bread. The grass grows almost supernaturally quickly, with a stalk growing up to a foot a day in ideal conditions. Despite this, Seagrass stubbornly refuses to be cultivated, with all attempts to sow seats or in any way tend to it utterly failing. A final confounding feature of Seagrass is that, despite it undeniably being a plant with individual blades of grass, it can support aquatic life, with small fish swimming through, living in, and dying in, the grass as though it were a lake.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I love the visuals on some of these plants. I also like how some have specialized uses a savvy PC can take advantage of.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

88. Grass spider. Found throughout savannahs through temperate climbs and beyond, the grass spider varies in size from half an inch across to the size of a dwarf's hand. It is a hunting spider akin to the tarantula, although it is hairless unlike its better-known kin. It gets its name because it matches the coloration of grasses in the area it hunts within. The grass spider looks like some form of young bunch grass until it begins moving. Plains cultures, including the Shoanti, consider it a delicacy (apparently it tastes like lemon chicken).

89. Sleeping mat moss. Found primarily in northern climes, this moss grows in large clumps within cooler forests, although it has been found even growing on the ground in subarctic regions. This plant gets its name because many a lumberjack, explorer, or wanderer has found it is quite soft and comfortable to sleep on. This makes it a great find for travellers in the north. Some even harvest the moss and use it to line their tents as they travel. The secret is the moss's ability to retain heat better than other plant life, which then keeps sleepers comfortable in turn.

90. Vicious silkworm. This caterpillar is odd in that it grows up to six inches long. It is found in a variety of colors depending on the region in which it is found, from deep greens in jungles to pale white in some deserts. The vicious silkworm is a voracious predator, attacking other insects and even small rodents and birds. It is no threat to larger animals, though it tastes bad to most. Epic battles between this creature and the grass spider (above) have been seen by explorers. It still spins silk to prevent falls, much like the grass spider, and this silk is just as useful as that of the better-known silkworms. Some shaman have attempted to utilize them as familiars with mixed results, while those living in the tropics keep them as pets that will keep the pests down. The butterfly form of the creature has translucent wings that resemble a stained-glass window in a variety of colors and lives off nectar like many other butterflies.

91. Voracious silkworm. Calling this the 'voracious' silkworm and the previous entry 'vicious' is a bad joke. These creatures are small, growing to a maximum of one inch long before pupating and attaining their adult form, that of a grey-white moth only two inches across. During their larval period, these are the bane of many a seamstress, tailor, or merchant, for the favorite food of this silkworm is silk, although other textiles are also eaten. They travel in groups of up to a hundred or so, making them easy to spot between meals, but are primarily nocturnal.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

92. Salt Grub and Firespit Beetle
This large (2-3 inches long) beetle larva is typically found in ocean-side swamps, where the saltwater meets freshwater. There's really nothing special about them, except that they taste really good when fried.
Its adult form, the Firespit beetle, is mildly poisonous, can spit an extremely hot substance, and is a great component for alchemist's fire.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

93. Bump
This tiny humanoid lives under beds, in floors, or in walls. They are nocturnal, so they make noises as they hunt for lost pieces of candy and snacks. If frightened, they can extend out their eyes generating fear as a gaze attack. Some children treat them as an imaginary friend. They have no set alignment, can advance as a monster, or any appropriate class.

Dark Archive

3 people marked this as a favorite.

94. Spitfires
These tiny to small flying saurians have a gray-green scaly body, and dull orange feathers on their wings and at the tip of their tails, resembling an earth archaeopteryx. They climb extremely well, and launch themselves from the tops of great trees and rocks in the plains and grasslands that they call home, often squabbling for precious territory suitable for nesting with others of their own kind, or larger creatures such as eagles).

As the months grow cooler, the plumage on a spitfire's tail turns a bright reddish-orange, and fill with a pyrophoric chemical. After the first cold snap of the year, they take flight en masse at the crack of dawn (when the sun's warmth heats up their sluggish bodies), and circle the drying grasslands, unleashing tailfeather after tailfeather to drift down into the grasslands, where it then catches on fire. The blaze drives all other life hidden the grasslands into a frenzy, and the spitfires gorge themselves on fleeing rodents and similar prey, sometimes to the point where they grow to heavy to fly, and end up burning to death in the grassfires they've created! More successful spitfires linger behind the trail of devastation, and prey on the burnt bodies of creatures that did not escape the annual inferno.

Those that make it back to their nests breed, and then fall into a torpid sleep atop their leathery eggs for the length of the cool winter season, to awaken in spring to the sound of hungry young, and the sight of a freshly blooming savannah, recovered from last season's burn off.

The brightly colored tailfeathers of spitfires 'in season' are prized, but most be carefully purged of their pyrophoric compounds, to prevent them from catching on fire at some inconvenient later date. The compounds themselves are a useful alternate component in the creation of alchemist's fire. Spitfire meat, much like vulture meat, is barely edible, and local cultures consider it taboo.


5 people marked this as a favorite.
Weirdo wrote:
67. Meat Apple. This small apple tree appears unremarkable, but biting into one reveals a meaty flesh similar to rare beef. The plant requires levels of iron in the soil which would be toxic to most plants. Cultivation requires careful fertilization, and a DC 18 Profession (Gardener) check.

I'm actually stealing and adapting these for my game with "fleshmelons". Always loved this super gross idea. :D

95. Ouroboros Snake
This large relative of the garter snake has very small fangs and is more-or-less harmless to humans, but it possesses a minor connection to the Ethereal Plane that to this day baffles researchers. A standard ouroboros snake is about the length of a gopher snake, and tends to be very plump and meaty. Ouroboros snakes are the only known "suivores": To gain nourishment, every few days, they eat themselves. They also do this to escape their chief predators—xills and hawks. When an ouroboros snake eats itself in this manner, it disappears from sight in 1 round, reappearing either on the Ethereal Plane or the Material Plane. In this manner, the snake regularly switches between Planes.

The ouroboros snake can only eat itself once per day. Ouroboros snakes are available as familiars at 3rd level, using the Improved Familiar feat.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

96. Land shrimp. Also known as scuttlers, these relatives of crayfish and shrimp are found in freshwater marshes throughout the world. Like some oceanic shrimp, scuttlers form relationships with creatures in the area, picking off parasites in return for protection. Favorite prey include leeches and insect larvae. Unlike normal shrimp, scuttlers can survive on land or water, and have been known to "bond" with creatures varying from snapping turtles to hippopotami. Your normal land shrimp is 2-5 inches long, brown to black in color, and harmless to humanoid life (but will happily feed on external parasites from humanoids as well).


5 people marked this as a favorite.

97. Magic Caddisfly

An adult magic caddisfly only lives for a few days, 1-2 weeks at most. During that time they seek out areas of magical energy, either places of power, recent magical battles, or spell casters themselves. They mate, lay their eggs and die.

The larvae then hatch a week or two later, when another spell is cast, or spell like ability is used. The larvae then feed off residual magical energy. While completely physical and living on the material plane, they construct a shell out of bits and pieces from the ethereal plane. This has the effect of concealing them on the material plane, but their shelters can be seen on the ethereal plane. They are so small though, they are typically only spotted when gathered in large clusters. They live as larvae for up to 2 years and reach a length of about 1/4 inch.

If one can see into the ethereal plane when examining a spell caster's component pouch, you will often find dozens of magic caddisfly larvae. They are harmless. Searching for them on the ethereal plane can be used as an indicator for recent spell activity or a site with active raw magical energy.


More "dire mice"! lol


4 people marked this as a favorite.

98. Diving basket weaver. This arachnid grows to approximately 4 inches in legspan and lives in ponds and lakes. A boring brown-black in color, what is notable about this spider is its means of catching prey. Like its kindred, the creature can spin webs. Unlike other spiders, it spins webs into a basket-shaped net then swims after its prey, scooping them up in the basket in a manner strangely reminiscent of dragonflies on the wing. A second basket held by the third pair of legs usually holds a bubble of air as it swims, allowing it to remain submerged for up to five minutes. If taken as a familiar, the spider grants the caster a +5 bonus to Craft (underwater basket weaving) checks, but only +2 to Craft (basketweaving) checks.

Yes, I had to do it.

99. Cotton vine. A distant relation to cotton, this vine grows in temperate forests primarily. Once in a while it is found growing along fences in rural lands. It is notable for its appearance, which is that of a stretched-out cotton boll, a pale white in color. The vine's leaves are white if seen at a distance, covered in fine white hairs, but deep green if seen up close. The vine itself can be braided into a long-lasting, serviceable cord easily enough. Washerwomen welcome the unobtrusive plant and use the vines for hanging laundry.

100.Dayshade. A rare herb, growing up to three feet in height with deep purple spikes for flowers. Dayshade is the product of a paranoid ruler wanting to be protected from being poisoned. Said monarch demanded his mightiest wizards to come up with a solution. They went to a druid, consulted, and several years later this plant began growing in the king's garden. Unfortunately, dayshade is of no use against allergies and the king died from a rare shellfish allergy. Dayshade is useful against poisons, however, but only those of the nightshade family. If the flower is used in any sort of poultice or purgative, dayshade will counter the effects of nightshade poison within two rounds of use. Against any other poison...it smells nice.

101. Lava mole. The origin of these creatures is unknown and suspected to involve breeding with creatures from the Inner Planes. Lava moles more closely resemble armadillos or even badgers than moles, being about one foot long with dark black scaly skin. These creatures have claws sharp enough to burrow through volcanic rock with ease. They subsist on the nutrients found in this substrate, tunneling through volcanoes, hot springs, and other areas of extreme geothermal activity. Their tunnels are capable of diverting lava flows, sometimes helping nearby humanoid populations survive as lava moles dislike humanoids as neighbors and avoid them. Lava moles are immune to fire and lava except as a way of drowning. They are also remarkably dense for their size, weighing up to 50 pounds.

Dark Archive

2 people marked this as a favorite.

[Stolen and adapted from a Scarred lands plant, and mashed up with brown mold, a little bit.]

102. Brownleaf Maidenhair Imaginatively named for it's broad brown leaves, and clumps of 'fur' like growths, brownleaf maidenhair is a ground-hugging vine that metabolizes heat for fuel, through some unknown means, sharing that trait with the more commonly known (and far more dangerous) brown mold. It tends to be cool to the touch, even in the hottest environs, and thrives particularly near lava beds or open calderas, but also steam geysers and similar sources of natural heat. The temperature difference between the vine and the surrounding air makes it more likely that water will condense upon it's leaves and funnel down into the tufts of 'hair' at the base of each leaf, which greedily suck in the moisture, perhaps serving to explain at least some of this plants unusual characteristics. In the presence of extreme heat, enough to cause harm, the plant grows so quickly as to be visible, and casting magic such as fireball into a patch of brownleaf will cause it to grow explosively away from the open flame (as the plant itself is not immune to fire, and burns, however fitfully), functioning somewhat similarly to an entangle spell, at the edges of the magical fire (or encroaching lava flow, which could be a dire occurrence for someone attempting to flee said lava flow...).

Alchemical treatment can cause the fibers extracted from the vine to retain some small degree of their cooling properties, and this plant is cultivated to weave into 'cooling cloaks' that are worn by some desert tribes to help survive the brutal days (and are hung out to collect dew, in the night).


1 person marked this as a favorite.

102. Wolf Hare
This rodent of unusual size lives primarily in northern climtes, primarily taiga's. They are born about the size of a small dog, and grow to be as large as timber or grey wolves. The name comes from this, the thick white and grey fur that covers them, and their bizarre hunting patterns. Wolf Hare's are omnivores, capable of eating tree roots with large, hardened teeth during lean months. Their primary diet however, are large herbivores such as elk and moose. When hunting these , they go about it in a very unique way, using their massive bursts of speed to bodily throw themselves at whatever it is their attacking from multiple sides. This typically proves deadly for one or two hares, but almost always brings their prey down.

They nest in massive underground burrow built underneath the frozen forests, where they can stay warm during the freezing cold months. Females produce litters ranging from three to seven leverets about every two months. Considering your average burrow contains multiple females, they quickly can overwhelm an environment if not for the prescence of apex pretadors such as rocs to keep their numbers in check. Farmers have found them particuarly dangerous, as cattle attracts them in droves.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Set wrote:

28. Bearowls These tiny to small owls have the head of a bear, but the body of an owl. A reverse of the more common owlbear, they are extremely easy-going and sociable, bonding easily with humanoids who keep them feeling safe and provide easy access to food, and spend an inordinate amount of their time sleeping. As familiars they grant a +2 bonus to Sense Motive checks. They are extremely rare, as they only hatch in clusters of 3 to 6 from owlbear eggs, and are usually devoured by their disappointed owlbear parent when this happens. Use owl statistics, but with no Perception bonus, the scent quality and an additional bite attack (1d4-2).

This is about inconsequential animals, not the coolest f~*+ing thing I've ever heard of


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Weirdo wrote:
67. Meat Apple. This small apple tree appears unremarkable, but biting into one reveals a meaty flesh similar to rare beef. The plant requires levels of iron in the soil which would be toxic to most plants. Cultivation requires careful fertilization, and a DC 18 Profession (Gardener) check.

Thought of an adventure, a side trek I suppose. while reading this. A small stand of Meat Apple Trees is being fertilized by a misunderstood, down-on-his-luck gardener. He lures people into the grove and either murders them himself or has minions/deathtraps to do the deed for him. The secret mastermind behind all of this is a hag (witches... apples? C'MON) who has promised the gardener (We'll call him Sam) that so long as he tends the trees with his grisly work he'll have wealth (selling the apples and by-products) and the woman of his dreams (a local barmaid).


Set wrote:

[Stolen and adapted from a Scarred lands plant, and mashed up with brown mold, a little bit.]

102. Brownleaf Maidenhair Imaginatively named for it's broad brown leaves, and clumps of 'fur' like growths, brownleaf maidenhair is a ground-hugging vine that metabolizes heat for fuel, through some unknown means, sharing that trait with the more commonly known (and far more dangerous) brown mold. It tends to be cool to the touch, even in the hottest environs, and thrives particularly near lava beds or open calderas, but also steam geysers and similar sources of natural heat. The temperature difference between the vine and the surrounding air makes it more likely that water will condense upon it's leaves and funnel down into the tufts of 'hair' at the base of each leaf, which greedily suck in the moisture, perhaps serving to explain at least some of this plants unusual characteristics. In the presence of extreme heat, enough to cause harm, the plant grows so quickly as to be visible, and casting magic such as fireball into a patch of brownleaf will cause it to grow explosively away from the open flame (as the plant itself is not immune to fire, and burns, however fitfully), functioning somewhat similarly to an entangle spell, at the edges of the magical fire (or encroaching lava flow, which could be a dire occurrence for someone attempting to flee said lava flow...).

Alchemical treatment can cause the fibers extracted from the vine to retain some small degree of their cooling properties, and this plant is cultivated to weave into 'cooling cloaks' that are worn by some desert tribes to help survive the brutal days (and are hung out to collect dew, in the night).

Could insightful PCs use the living vines a way to move around/over heat-based obstacles? The fluff describes the Maidenhair growing beside lava or steam, but the plant itself remains cool to the touch. Could the PCs use a vine to climb down the side of an active volcano, immune to the ambient heat as long as they're in contact with said vine?


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Operakeet: these small psittacine birds LOVE music, especially the human voice. A flock of operakeets is known as an ovation.

They make two sounds themselves: the sound of a hand clapping, and the sound of an impressed whistle. They mob talented performers, attempting to land on their shoulders and kiss their lips. They naturally live in the forest, but are often found infesting music halls and conservatories, where their acidic guano makes them adorable, horrible pests. Sometimes, they are disparagingly called "groupies."

If a bard attempts a performance in an area infested with operakeets, they must make concentration checks to maintain the performance much like a wizard casting in combat (the DC depends on the size of the ovation). If they have an operakeet familiar or are accustomed to operakeets, they gain "lingering performance" as a bonus feat while being mobbed/applauded by operakeets, as their encouraging whistles keep the magic in the air that much longer.

51 to 100 of 523 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder First Edition / Homebrew and House Rules / 1001 Inconsequential Flora & Fauna All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.