The Monkey's Treefort


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Freehold DM wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Pale Publican (blog post)
I don't have my glasses on. I misread this as pale REPUBLICAN, and I was going to tsk you for a moment until I realized it makes no sense as you don't live in the us. Ha!

If I was writing anything about Republicans it would be more related to Republican Rome than USA.

Well, unless I'd started writing a dystopian near-future corporate-punk.


Drejk wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:

Nice! Lots of plot hooks built right in Drejk

I do have to say the name made me think the monster was a bartender at first :P

Publicans were private tax collectors hired by Rome. I couldn't find any better single-word term and pale collector.

Bartender monster? Undead innkeeper who murdered his guests to steal from them (and maybe eat their corpses)? *makes notes*

this shows up in a few western society tales as a violation of the guest right. The undead version would be a twist that could be awesome. Make sure it had unfailing manners and grace.


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Happy Valentines day to all!

Was too busy working, so haven't planned ahead for my wife today. Which is bad.

She (and Kids) went to visit her dad in New Orleans Sat while I was working, Which is good.

and she is driving home now. Which is bad,...

Time for my imagination to kick in and save me!

Anytime now,...

:/

Our budget (nonexistent) doesn't allow for us to go out much. At all.
Especially as a dinner or movie as a family costs a small fortune. (To me anyway)

So that's probably what it will be. She does like to go out. :)

Silver Crusade

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aeglos wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:

I am using this long weekend of bitter cold temperatures to cook delicious food.

Yesterday was seared salmon filets with broccoli and couscous. Today I am making a big pot of Sunday sauce (even though it's Saturday) to last into the week. Tomorrow for Valentine's is John's favorite: Beef Wellington.

Oh that sauce smells good...

what is sunday sauce ? and how do you make it?

It's an Italian-American tradition of a slow-simmered tomato sauce filled with any combination of meatballs, Italian sausage, spare ribs, pork shoulder, or whatever else is on hand. It simmers all afternoon to meld the flavors and tenderize any of the tougher meats.

From my understanding, it is a derivation of the Neapolitan ragù, adapted to use various meats that were abundant in the US. Every Italian-American grandmother has her own traditional recipe.

I myself have no Italian ancestry, but I love Italian-American cuisine, and learned to make it from my ex's Italian grandmother. None of her actual descendants took any interest in carrying on her recipes, so she was all to happy to show me how to make all of it.

(Yesterday's sauce was slightly too sweet and tomatoey for my taste. Not sure where I went wrong. It's usually pretty consistent.)

Silver Crusade

Drejk wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:

Nice! Lots of plot hooks built right in Drejk

I do have to say the name made me think the monster was a bartender at first :P

Publicans were private tax collectors hired by Rome. I couldn't find any better single-word term and pale collector.

Bartender monster? Undead innkeeper who murdered his guests to steal from them (and maybe eat their corpses)? *makes notes*

I like the name. Publican is an obscure enough word that few people are likely to bring many preconceptions to it. Plus it is alliterative.

Silver Crusade

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Now onto the Beef Wellington. If it weren't John's favorite, I would leave this for a "I'll wait to order it at a restaurant" dish. It is fussy. labor-intensive, and soooo easy to screw up. Meat is seared and chilling in the refrigerator now. You have to prep it, then chill it; if you put it in contact with the puff pastry while it is still warm, you can ruin the pastry. Pain in the ass.

Wish me luck.


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CH CH CH CH CH CH CH CH CH CH


Good luck! I'm making my pizza for Valentines


And doing maps


stoopid maps

Silver Crusade

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It was a success! My best one yet.

Silver Crusade

Also, I experimented with a dessert using chocolate pasta. He had given it to me as a gift about a year ago and I never figured out what to do with it. I found a recipe for German Chocolate Pasta and gave it a go.

Meh. It's kind of a texture thing. I don't know if I can handle the dessert pasta concept. Not bad, but not something I'd go out of my way to do again,

Silver Crusade

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For aeglos's benefit: there is nothing German about American desserts called "German chocolate". According to Wikipedia, the German chocolate cake was invented by an American named Samuel German.

Wikipedia entry

In this context, "German chocolate" refers to anything chocolaty that is combined or topped wih a mixture of caramel, coconut, and pecans.

Food history is cool.

Silver Crusade

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Apparently June 11th is German chocolate cake day. I have to remember to celebrate.

Silver Crusade

It's my second favorite cake after the Black Forest Cake or Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte - which is actually German.


Chocolate pasta seems like it almost asks for truffles, maybe some light French type of sauce and a few green herbs for color.

Not that I could afford any of those things, that's just what I might do. :-)

Congrats on the Beef Wellington, those are not easy, ever. :-)


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WALKING DEAD!!!!!!!!!!


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Celestial Healer wrote:

It was a success! My best one yet.

I saw the pic on FB Very nice!


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All I can say is DAMN!


Even though it followed the graphic novel pretty close


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ABRAHAM! FNCK YEAH!!!


damn!

Silver Crusade

Kinda sad SO and myself couldn't hang out today. Or tomorrow. Ah, well.

Coming up with a dungeon last minute. Listening to DragonForce. Slightly exhausted. Life is good.


time to prep for work sigh


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Celestial Healer wrote:


I myself have no Italian ancestry, but I love Italian-American cuisine, and learned to make it from my ex's Italian grandmother. None of her actual descendants took any interest in carrying on her recipes, so she was all to happy to show me how to make all of it.

(Yesterday's sauce was slightly too sweet and tomatoey for my taste. Not sure where I went wrong. It's usually pretty consistent.)

My wife's grandparents were Italian. From Italy. ;)

Grandpa actually remembered coming over on the boat to get away from Mussolini. :P

My wife is keeping her grandmother's recipes alive.
The biggest problem is translation. Not Italian to English. Translating AMOUNTS from 'Grandma' to 'actual measurements'. ;)

One of our favorites is 'Cheesy Spaghetti'. It is basically a teeny bit of pureed tomatoes, so you can melt the 4 or 5 types of cheeses into it, then dump in your favorite noodles. Heart attack on a plate. And good. :)

MY personal favorite is the beef stroganoff. <drools>


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"Ragadolf wrote:

My wife is keeping her grandmother's recipes alive.
The biggest problem is translation. Not Italian to English. Translating AMOUNTS from 'Grandma' to 'actual measurements'. ;)

yeah, I know the problem, Grandmas usually cook by experience not by messuring, which makes it freaking hard to recook. I think Grandmas worldwide do this on purpuse


Celestial Healer wrote:

Now onto the Beef Wellington. If it weren't John's favorite, I would leave this for a "I'll wait to order it at a restaurant" dish. It is fussy. labor-intensive, and soooo easy to screw up. Meat is seared and chilling in the refrigerator now. You have to prep it, then chill it; if you put it in contact with the puff pastry while it is still warm, you can ruin the pastry. Pain in the ass.

Wish me luck.

good luck, CH

how are the wedding preparations going ?


Celestial Healer wrote:

For aeglos's benefit: there is nothing German about American desserts called "German chocolate". According to Wikipedia, the German chocolate cake was invented by an American named Samuel German.

Wikipedia entry

In this context, "German chocolate" refers to anything chocolaty that is combined or topped wih a mixture of caramel, coconut, and pecans.

Food history is cool.

lol, never heard of it, the cake is completly unknown over here, not even a german wiki page :-)


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Celestial Healer wrote:
It's my second favorite cake after the Black Forest Cake or Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte - which is actually German.

of course I have heard of THAT, a classic over here.

may I recommend Frankfurter Kranz my mom makes a great one


or Streuselkuchen nothing beats Streuselkuchen

Silver Crusade

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aeglos wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:

Now onto the Beef Wellington. If it weren't John's favorite, I would leave this for a "I'll wait to order it at a restaurant" dish. It is fussy. labor-intensive, and soooo easy to screw up. Meat is seared and chilling in the refrigerator now. You have to prep it, then chill it; if you put it in contact with the puff pastry while it is still warm, you can ruin the pastry. Pain in the ass.

Wish me luck.

good luck, CH

how are the wedding preparations going ?

Slowly. I'm working on the save-the-date mailers.

Silver Crusade

aeglos wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:

For aeglos's benefit: there is nothing German about American desserts called "German chocolate". According to Wikipedia, the German chocolate cake was invented by an American named Samuel German.

Wikipedia entry

In this context, "German chocolate" refers to anything chocolaty that is combined or topped wih a mixture of caramel, coconut, and pecans.

Food history is cool.

lol, never heard of it, the cake is completly unknown over here, not even a german wiki page :-)

I recommend it if you are ever in the US again. You could comment that as a German, you had to come to America for German chocolate cake :) Sooooo good.

A lot of Americans are under the assumption it is German, as it is not common knowledge that it was named after a guy with the surname "German".

Silver Crusade

Patrick Curtin wrote:
Celestial Healer wrote:

It was a success! My best one yet.

I saw the pic on FB Very nice!

Thank you! Perfect medium rare, if I do say so myself,


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Ugh. I really need some more sleep. But it is so hard to sleep during the day :/. To get in 8 hours I needed to sleep until 8 pm. Heh. Not happening.

On the plus side, got my taxes done. I should have enough to get to GenCon easily and still get a few other things done.

Now I need to work overnight, then run home and change tomorrow morning , go to Boston, come home and collapse around 10 pm. Ora pro me!


Go Monkey! :)


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aeglos wrote:
"Ragadolf wrote:

My wife is keeping her grandmother's recipes alive.
The biggest problem is translation. Not Italian to English. Translating AMOUNTS from 'Grandma' to 'actual measurements'. ;)

yeah, I know the problem, Grandmas usually cook by experience not by messuring, which makes it freaking hard to recook. I think Grandmas worldwide do this on purpuse

Oh I completely agree. :)

I figure it is so they can smile when their son-in-law (Or grandson-in-law) says, "How come yours doesn't taste like your mother's?"
;P


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aeglos wrote:
"Ragadolf wrote:

My wife is keeping her grandmother's recipes alive.
The biggest problem is translation. Not Italian to English. Translating AMOUNTS from 'Grandma' to 'actual measurements'. ;)

yeah, I know the problem, Grandmas usually cook by experience not by messuring, which makes it freaking hard to recook. I think Grandmas worldwide do this on purpuse

That makes cooking art, not science.

Silver Crusade

I learned a great deal from my ex's grandmother.

My own grandmother, on the other hand, was a terrible cook. My grandfather (ever tactful) was known on occasion to pick up her roasts with a fork and ask if anyone present needed new soles for their shoes.

The one thing she could always do, though, were mashed potatoes. They were magical. That was the Irish in her.


The Irish were sadly deficient in the cuisine department. It's why so many like myself have adopted Italian as my foster cuisine.


Patrick Curtin wrote:
The Irish were sadly deficient in the cuisine department. It's why so many like myself have adopted Italian as my foster cuisine.

Welcome to the family! :)

What kind of a heart attack would you like to eat?
First?
;P

I do like my wife's (aka grandma's recipes) cooking. Sadly, she doesn't cook often.
Not because she can't or won't or doesn't want too, she is just too,... dang,.... slow,... :)

She simply cannot multi task. If she is cooking a special dinner, for my birthday say, and she wants it ready for 6pm, she has to start at 1pm. 2 at the latest. :)

But I will admit, while patience is not my particular virtue, it has always been worth waiting for. ;)


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Two am in a damp parking lot. Ah well, it could be -10 like yesterday. Funny how 37 feels balmy after a freeze like that


Ragadolf wrote:
Patrick Curtin wrote:
The Irish were sadly deficient in the cuisine department. It's why so many like myself have adopted Italian as my foster cuisine.

Welcome to the family! :)

What kind of a heart attack would you like to eat?
First?
;P

I do like my wife's (aka grandma's recipes) cooking. Sadly, she doesn't cook often.
Not because she can't or won't or doesn't want too, she is just too,... dang,.... slow,... :)

She simply cannot multi task. If she is cooking a special dinner, for my birthday say, and she wants it ready for 6pm, she has to start at 1pm. 2 at the latest. :)

But I will admit, while patience is not my particular virtue, it has always been worth waiting for. ;)

My mother was a bad cook, sadly. Late in life I have discovered I have a flair for it. A week from Wednesday I will be serving up a homemade Chinese buffet. My rough draft menu is Hot and sour soup (I've made this before-really good), beef and broccoli, chicken fingers, beef lo Mein, and some sort of fried rice.

I'm a little leery of the chicken fingers as I haven't done the tempura batter myself before, but nothing ventured-nothing gained.

Liberty's Edge Contributor

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Ooh ooh eeh oooh aaaaah?


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1d4 ⇒ 2 goblin babies know the answer to this one:

"Ting tang walla walla bing bang"


Drejk wrote:
aeglos wrote:
"Ragadolf wrote:

My wife is keeping her grandmother's recipes alive.
The biggest problem is translation. Not Italian to English. Translating AMOUNTS from 'Grandma' to 'actual measurements'. ;)

yeah, I know the problem, Grandmas usually cook by experience not by messuring, which makes it freaking hard to recook. I think Grandmas worldwide do this on purpuse
That makes cooking art, not science.

lol, so true


Paris Crenshaw wrote:
Ooh ooh eeh oooh aaaaah?

Hi Paris *waves*


PARIS


oo-OOO!


Paris Crenshaw wrote:
Ooh ooh eeh oooh aaaaah?

Look at you with the über-cool 'Contributor' tag! Welcome to the Treefort! Have a seat, eat some banana nut bread, try out the PlayStation X VurtRig! (Don't ask- time travel is a grey area legally)


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Jackin' Ape wrote:
oo-OOO!

.

Who let the apes out?

Ook ook ook ook!

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