Raise dead after killing fellow PC


Pathfinder Society


What is the proper etiquette if one PC kills another due to failing a save against confusion, dominate, ect.
Should the killing PC offer to pay for the raise dead?
Should the dead PC's player ask for the other PC to pay if they do not offer?
Should they split the cost?
What are your thought?

Dark Archive

They aren't responsible for a party members death.
They could offer a helping hand but they aren't required.


I concur. if the pc was killed due to the other being under a magical effect, than it is not their fault. It might be polite to help raise them, but Its not their fault.

Silver Crusade 5/5

Kinda depends a lot on circumstances. If you as a player feel guilty (eg, you're playing a twinked out murder machine with dumped Will, or you didn't take an option to take yourself out of the fight if you rolled an "act normally" while confused) then you might feel guilty and offer to help more than normal.

But otherwise, I'd treat it the same as any death. If your local culture is that people tend to contribute for a raise dead then do, if it isn't then don't.

Definitely agaisnt etiquette to be the only person NOT offering to chip in for a raise dead, mind :-)


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Animate Dead is cheaper. Reduce, Reuse, Reanimate.

4/5

In general I contribute if the character death helped save the party, or if I'm playing a good aligned cleric, paladin, or other religious type. I admit, certain of my characters if confused might drop weapons as a free, pull out manacles as a swift, and handcuff themselves as a standard if they get one round of act normally. Hmm, thinking that reminds me to buy a couple sets of masterwork manacles for people like my magus and my gunslinger.

Shadow Lodge 5/5

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber
MichaelCullen wrote:
What is the proper etiquette if one PC kills another due to failing a save against confusion, dominate, ect.

Well etiquette would dictate that we're all nice people and help a fellow player out.

That said, if the player's being a jerk, or your character is a jerk, etiquette may be overridden by roleplay.

5/5 ⦵⦵⦵

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Most groups I've played with have chipped in fairly heavily for dead party members. I think it would go double in this case.


This recently happened when I GMed the Sky Key Solution. Everybody pitched in equally for his raise and restos. The killer purchased a Clear Spindle Ioun Stone on that chronicle.

5/5

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You mean, the party isn't chipping in to help pay for EVERY dead PC, no matter the cause? Well, THERE'S your problem...

Someone who dies because the monster attacked them instead of you and rolled a crit has saved your life, and the lives of your companions. Why would you not help them out after such a thing?

5/5 ⦵⦵⦵

GM Lamplighter wrote:

You mean, the party isn't chipping in to help pay for EVERY dead PC, no matter the cause? Well, THERE'S your problem...

Well, terminal stupidity is terminal.

Liberty's Edge

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Unless the player of the dead character was an absolute jerk, or the character died because of his players total stupidity,I would do my best to effect his character's resurrection ( assuming the player wished to have his character resurrected ). I have found this to be the case in all the PFS groups I have played with.

Shadow Lodge 4/5

Eh, I wish. Not everyone cares.

1/5

Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I thought you couldn't 'pool resources' to have someone raised like that?

Lantern Lodge 5/5

Wei Ji the Learner wrote:


I thought you couldn't 'pool resources' to have someone raised like that?

You cannot pool prestige points.

You can pool gold.

Scarab Sages

Quoted from the Guide:

"Pathfinder Society. Please note that players
can (and are encouraged to) share or pool their resources in
order to bring a dead party member back to life. They may
not, however, pool Prestige Points to do so, even if they’re
from the same faction. PCs can also sell off gear, including
the dead character’s gear, at 50% of its listed value to raise
money to purchase a spell that will return their slain ally
from the dead, though they can only do so in a settlement
and they cannot sell off any items found during the current
scenario that they haven’t purchased."

1/5

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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Martin Kauffman 530 wrote:
Unless the player of the dead character was an absolute jerk, or the character died because of his players total stupidity,I would do my best to effect his character's resurrection ( assuming the player wished to have his character resurrected ). I have found this to be the case in all the PFS groups I have played with.

Examples:

Party Member A (for unprintable profanity) decides tossing bombs that bounce all over the place and maul party members 'on accident' and laughs every time it happens (because they can't hit the 'touch' AC) gets deaderated by something nasty.

Since they were being a bit of an A with the bomb-tossing, I probably would not feel so keen on trying to help them out.

Party Member B is the party tank and has stood up to the colossal black ooze that is threatening to eat the party. Alas, he succumbs to damage in the last round as the party brings down the target.

Since they were Being a hero and doing something that the rest of the party could not, and the party survived solely because of their action, that's really a good time to start putting the pennies together to make magic happen.

Party Member C is mediocre at their job, has a huge cash stockpile because they've been mooching off everyone at the tables they play at, and refuse to use any of their expendables to help out the party. This may or may not have led to their needing the service, this is irrelevant. The point is that they *could* have made the same sort of 'capital improvements' that every other sensible party member did, and now are expecting the party to 'pay the bill' for their selfishness.

In situation A, I'd be very adverse to 'rewarding' dangerous party-endangering behavior by helping fund their return.

In situation B, The party member made the investment, put themselves 'on the line' and *held* it for the party to succeed. Even if the personality wasn't the greatest, I'd be chipping in to get him or her taken care of.

In situation C, they have the money stockpiled that they *could* have used beforehand to avoid this sort of thing, and are expecting *me* to pay for them. Why should I chip in if they A. Have cash reserves from being cheap and B. Are being stingy with the consumables that the party could have used to prevent that from happening in the first place?

Now the question is... did the murdering character deep-six the save because they didn't expend any resources or effort to stop themselves? (Folio rerolls, glue themselves to the floor with a tanglefoot bag, etc)

In that case? Weight probably falls on the murderer.

If on the other hand, it was 'one of those things' and they'd done what level best they could to keep themselves from doing it, including taking what precautions they could? That's a different thing.

Accidents and deaths happen.

HELPING make them happen, though...

Again, mileage may vary. I'm still learning this thing.


I appreciate all of the input. A lot of it was well thought out.

**********************

While not pertinent to the more general advice I was seeking, I will post the circumstances that led to my ask in the first place.

We were playing a 5-9, with an APL of 6.5 with no 8's or 9's. (Knew it was dangerous to begin with)
My PC (the one who died) was lvl 6 and the accidental killer was 6 as well if memory serves.

The PC who killed me was a Geokeneticist with a will save of +4 (Not "dumped" but fairly poor)

We both failed our saves against confusion (DC 20) and he hit like a ton of bricks (pun intended).

The end result was I paid for it and did not ask his assistance, none was offered either.

The Exchange 5/5 Venture-Lieutenant, Texas—Dallas & Ft. Worth aka Belafon

Once upon a time...

Spoilers for Race for the Runecarved Key:
Pickup group, high tier. The fight in the cathedral breaks out and the thief runs away. "Go after him?" asks the diviner wizard player looking at all the henchmen blocking our way. "You bet," I replied.

So the wizard dimension doors after him. But just takes himself! "Crap!" I exclaim. "He's in trouble out there by himself." As a monk I'm the only other one fast enough to get out the door in one round (before the control spells lock in the rest of our party).

To speed up the story the wizard gets brutalized for a round and vanishes. I move in to grapple the bad guy and protect the wizard. One contingency later I eat a power word stun and then get killed by a lot of sneak attacks the next round.


Long story short the wizard player felt that I had sacrificed myself to protect him. He refused to let me pay for any of my raise dead costs. Not necessary, not expected, but greatly appreciated.

At least in the games I have played the expectation is that if a player has the means to raise herself (especially if she has the prestige) she will handle it on her own, regardless of the circumstances. If she doesn't, the expectation is that everyone at the table will chip in. Occasionally a player or two will offer to chip in even if it isn't necessary because he either like the player, like the character, or feel the character's death was a direct result of helping/protecting him.

The Exchange

Kevin Willis wrote:
At least in the games I have played the expectation is that if a player has the means to raise herself (especially if she has the prestige) she will handle it on her own, regardless of the circumstances. If she doesn't, the expectation is that everyone at the table will chip in. Occasionally a player or two will offer to chip in even if it isn't necessary because he either like the player, like the character, or feel the character's death was a direct result of helping/protecting him.

I think this is how I would expect most games to go. Prestige is basically a get out of jail free card added on to even your normal wealth so you should be able to handle it. If you can't then maybe some people at the table could lend a hand.

To OP:

It makes sense to me that the other person wouldn't offer to help raise you because of a confusion until you asked for it and only then if you couldn't raise on your own without significant loss. Prestige just makes it very hard to actually lose a character.

5/5

Ragoz wrote:
Prestige just makes it very hard to actually lose a character.

... past a certain level. But at the level these folks were at, a raise basically guts your PC's resources. Until about level 7, it is almost always better to split gold for a raise than to have one player use all his prestige. And again, the fact that another PC died probably means yours didn't, so it seems inappropriate to not split the costs. People buy CLW wands and don't make the cleric do all the healing; why should death not also be a shared cost?

Lantern Lodge 5/5

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It's pretty gauche to ask for someone to help cover your raise dead.

But, at the same time, it's pretty gauche to not (at least) offer to help someone else pay for theirs.

For what it's worth, I always offer to pay 1/Xth of the cost of a compatriot that died in my stead (barring some sort of impressive douchebaggery). It could have been any of us.

DUDE, BRO, DO YOU EVEN COOPERATE?


In my home games we usually divide the treasure into equal portions of (number of adventurers+1). The extra share goes to cover resurrection costs and other things that are useful to the party. It also helps create a sense of group cohesion; you can fight your hardest to defend your buddies know that if you die they will have the funds to bring you back. Either everyone makes it out or no one does kind of thing.


My barbarian rage chemist bought a clear spindle for his teammates more than himself.

Dark Archive

Just remember the clear spindle does nothing agaisnt confusion.

Grand Lodge 4/5 Venture-Captain, California—Sacramento aka FLite

Or against neutral casters.

5/5 ⦵⦵⦵

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and scenarios have a definition of "neutral" rather in line with the players...


Sin of Asmodeus wrote:
Just remember the clear spindle does nothing agaisnt confusion.

I am aware. The investment in this has stopped 2 potential tpks.

Plus not many neutral casters dominate person to kill your allies.

5/5 ⦵⦵ Venture-Captain, Germany—Hamburg

Roan wrote:
In my home games we usually divide the treasure into equal portions of (number of adventurers+1). The extra share goes to cover resurrection costs and other things that are useful to the party. It also helps create a sense of group cohesion; you can fight your hardest to defend your buddies know that if you die they will have the funds to bring you back. Either everyone makes it out or no one does kind of thing.

Since this is for PFS, that tactics won't be possible, though.

Silver Crusade 5/5

Andreas Forster wrote:
Roan wrote:
In my home games we usually divide the treasure into equal portions of (number of adventurers+1).
Since this is for PFS, that tactics won't be possible, though.

I've seen tables agree up front to split the cost for a raise dead should somebody fall which seems a fairly good PFS equivalent.

Both of these, of course, rely on the players trusting each other to have brought a reasonable character to the table. While I'll always contribute to a party resurrect in anything approximating normal circumstances I DO reserve the right to not do so if the player really deserves for their character to die.

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