Do your characters age as you do?


Gamer Life General Discussion


This is primarily a question for those who have played for a decade or longer (although none are excluded from discussion). Have you noticed yourself playing older characters as you yourself have gotten older?

When I began playing tabletop in high school, nearly all of my characters were teens themselves. As I was in my mid twenties, so were many of my characters. Now, midway through this decade of life, I find myself more willing to make 30 something characters. I'm curious if this is an aspect of my style (as I tend to prefer characters that resonate with facets of myself), or if this is an overall trend experienced by others?


Actually, when I was younger I would play mostly older(than me)characters, and as I have gotten older, my range has expanded both directions.


Whereas my range is my age or younger, but almost never over.

I suspect it has to do with my feeling of understanding what it's like to be a particular age due to personal experience.


Only slightly. I started playing when I was 12 and most of my characters (I only played D&D for the next 10 years or so, with some negligible excursions to Palladium and Shadowrun) and all characters started at 18 or so. That age has expanded to 18-21 over the 23 years I've played. In general, it depends on the relative power level they are when I create them. New, inexperienced characters are younger than older, more powerful characters. In D&D the age tends to be younger in any case. In other games, the settings is the primary concern for how old a character is upon creation.
In Ars Magica it depends on how well-established the character I create is - is it a fresh out of the Gauntlet magus or an older guy who got tired of his old Covenant?
In L5R is the character a newly gone through gempukku ex-kid of 15 or a veteran of 20-30 or a elderly respected character of nearly 40?
In the Laundry Files or CoC what sort of background does the character have, how long has s/he worked for the Laundry or before he started getting involved in unfortunate distant relatives and their unpleasant family secrets.


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You mean relatively of course. My elves are impossible to play as anything other than older than me in years. But I tend to create characters that are starting out their careers as early adults; late teens to early twenties in human years. And my characters that start out at higher levels tend to have older adult age categories; 20s-30s in human years... I don't think I have ever played an elderly person.


I'm 22 and my characters are invariably my age group for their species.

I haven't been playing tabletop rpg long enough for there to be any kind of change over time.


The oldest starting human character I have ever played was 25 - his backstory included an energy drain to explain his experience despite the low level.


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Aranna wrote:

You mean relatively of course. My elves are impossible to play as anything other than older than me in years. But I tend to create characters that are starting out their careers as early adults; late teens to early twenties in human years. And my characters that start out at higher levels tend to have older adult age categories; 20s-30s in human years... I don't think I have ever played an elderly person.

Yes, relative ages were assumed. My first character in Vampire was exactly 600 years older than me, having been born in the late 1370's, but she was embraced into vampiric unlife at the age of 17, so I considered her from that mindset. (Although she would have never considered attending high school or dating schoolchildren)

In the case of elves, I sometimes like to play what I would think of as a "teenage" elf, being only 80 or so. Then again, what that would mean depends on whether the 100+ idea is seen as physical or psychological development (or both).


Grey Lensman wrote:
The oldest starting human character I have ever played was 25 - his backstory included an energy drain to explain his experience despite the low level.

That's a neat idea. Almost makes me want to see the inverse in play, a nearly middle aged character who is inexperienced and just starting out in life, having been the victim of an aging effect as a child.

Shadow Lodge

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I turned 50 this year and the maturity range of my characters varies from a young adult Ifrit who is barely mature enough to be adventuring with his human counterparts to a venerable gnome who probably should be retired but just won't quit. I design a character concept and fit the age to that character.

I would say that more of my characters are teen to twenty something (or the equivalent) than any other group; but they certainly cover the entire gambit of age groups even now.


On average they keep pace with me; there are a few outliers in either direction.

Grand Lodge

I'm in my mid 40's, and I play 2nd edition, where character advancement takes a little longer on average than it does in PF. I tend to make 1st level characters (and NPCs) in their late teens or early 20's and as they slowly level, they age as well. As a result, I tend to make higher level characters (and NPCs) older.

Dark Archive

Early twenties here in real life.

My characters' ages are all over the place.

Pathfinder Society:
-1 was 78, errata has lowered his age slightly
-2 was also 78, errata has lowered his age significantly
-3 is a nearly venerable human woman
-4 haven't played, ever
-5 was 89, errata buggers his entire story line, not sure how to proceed
-6 middle aged
-7 Around 18
-8 AP credit baby, never played
-9 Elven, but young by their standards


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First off, I'm 49 now.
I have always wanted to play one of those games that lasted 10 years. To play a character that aged over a long time would be cool. In my area I knew people that told me about 'that' game. The games I was in lasted to 5th or 6th level, so age really didn't matter. Even now in Pathfinder I play a human or half-elf and I set the age in the 20's or 30's. The APs go to 15th level and really the age doesn't change. It would be interesting if there was an AP where your character aged over a time period to show his or her levels. If I played an elf or dwarf, it really wouldn't matter. :D

Sovereign Court

As a rule, no, though I could try that as a new angle.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I'm 43.

I've had characters in other campaigns that have aged FASTER than me, because one game=one month (later turned to one game=two weeks), and I've had characters that have stayed relatively 'static' in comparison.

Hadn't considered the idea of someone that was say, starting their adventuring career in their 40's, though. Huh.


On average? Sort of. I have played two characters who were extremely older in the last decade, whereas before that they were almost all teens equivalent. I actually played a grandma-through use of other material that allowed them to stay perceptibly young, if not chronologically so.

I think if anything, I've moved more into ageless as opposed to young characters.

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