Introductory Module?


Adventures

Liberty's Edge

I'm considering starting a second game group and one of the potential players is a complete rookie at RPGs, but is a competitive Magic: the Gathering player, so should handle the rules fairly well. Are there any Pathfinder modules that you would recommend as a solid introduction both to RPGs in general and Pathfinder in particular, but aren't necessarily aimed at teaching the rules from the ground up?

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps Subscriber

Master of the Fallen fortress, a free RPGday module, has a little bit of everything, so he can get a good idea of how an adventure works.
Skillchecks, fights with different types of enemies, status effects (like sickened), a bit of investigation.

It is however not too exiting for experienced players.


Crypt of the Everflame is another intro adventure with a lot of the damage being non-lethal in the beginning ie it's more forgiving.

Like Master of the Fallen Fortress, it also has skill checks, different monsters, status effects, and traps.

Liberty's Edge

Cool. Thanks for the pointers. I figure a quick one-off to act as a demo before settling into a full-on campaign might be a smart.


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With MotFF, you can easily segue into a full campaign, since the module gives you a ton of options for why exactly the players' characters are checking out the tower. Notably, there's an invitation to the Pathfinder Society practically served up on a platter if your players want to go that route, so the module as a whole is very 'connectable'.

You might consider having each player pick a MtG card that looks like their character or something!

Liberty's Edge

Handaxe Beak wrote:
With MotFF, you can easily segue into a full campaign, since the module gives you a ton of options for why exactly the players' characters are checking out the tower. Notably, there's an invitation to the Pathfinder Society practically served up on a platter if your players want to go that route, so the module as a whole is very 'connectable'.

That's awesome! I think I've found my starting point. Now I'll just have to order the book and decide thread to draw out.

Quote:
You might consider having each player pick a MtG card that looks like their character or something!

I'm a BIG fan of character portraits, so I will definitely be asking players to find art. In honor of the now-dead (or at least dying) Face Cards line, I'm printing my own character portrait cards for home use.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps Subscriber
Luke Styer wrote:
Handaxe Beak wrote:
With MotFF, you can easily segue into a full campaign, since the module gives you a ton of options for why exactly the players' characters are checking out the tower. Notably, there's an invitation to the Pathfinder Society practically served up on a platter if your players want to go that route, so the module as a whole is very 'connectable'.

That's awesome! I think I've found my starting point. Now I'll just have to order the book and decide thread to draw out.

Its a free download here

Liberty's Edge

Ah, yes. I had forgotten that it was a free product and not available in print. If I can't have a print copy, though, a free PDF is the next best thing. Thanks!


Silverhex Chronicles


Crypt of the Everflame has been mentioned, and it's a good option.

Stuff to cover:

- Attacks & AC
- Saves
- Skill checks
- DR

I tend to suggest that new players try Ranger for their first PC. It's a good class all around, but has some features that make it a bit easier for a new player:

1) It has a good BAB, and a d10 hit die, which makes it likely the player will hit (fun!) and live (dying is not fun usually).

2) Pathfinder is just awash in options; for a newbie, the vast selection of feats, archetypes, classes, and so on can be overwhelming. The Combat Style in Ranger nudges the player towards a particular type of build, and there's only a handful of styles, which makes the choice easier.

3) It has a pretty good number of skill points to spread around so they can learn about skills.

4) It gets a very limited amount of magic at level 4. Magic is hard, because it frequently breaks the normal rules. It's hard to use effectively without knowing the rest of the rules pretty well. So Ranger spells are a fairly gentle introduction to that.

That said, the player should play what they want, and if that means they jump in on the deep end with a multi-class rogue/druid like my last newbie, well, some people learn best through jumping in and struggling.

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