Is it intended for monsters to grab -> constrict -> release -> grab -> constrict in one attack sequence?


Rules Questions

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Natural Weapons don't occupy metaphorical hands, and they don't occupy physical hands either unless the attacking creature is using claws on their hands or something.


Snowblind wrote:
Natural Weapons don't occupy metaphorical hands, and they don't occupy physical hands either unless the attacking creature is using claws on their hands or something.

Not according to the Slashing Grace FAQ. They may not qualify as a second weapon for TWF, but they still count as using additional hands. Which is what grappling cares about.


Calth wrote:
Ruling it this way is both consistent with every other ruling...

I'm not going to search their posts now, but I'm pretty sure Paizo devs have explicitly said that grappled creatures with multiple nat attacks can still full attack, not explicitly dealing with the no-2H rule per se, but just using said creatures as example.


Calth wrote:
Snowblind wrote:
Natural Weapons don't occupy metaphorical hands, and they don't occupy physical hands either unless the attacking creature is using claws on their hands or something.
Not according to the Slashing Grace FAQ. They may not qualify as a second weapon for TWF, but they still count as using additional hands. Which is what grappling cares about.

Two weapons!=two hands.

Slashing Grace prevents using more than one weapon during a full attack, and it also prevents hands other than the one attacking from being occupied (even passively). Grappling just prevents using more than one hand during a full attack. These two are not logically equivalent, and the FAQ doesn't suggest otherwise.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Snowblind wrote:
Calth wrote:
Snowblind wrote:
Natural Weapons don't occupy metaphorical hands, and they don't occupy physical hands either unless the attacking creature is using claws on their hands or something.
Not according to the Slashing Grace FAQ. They may not qualify as a second weapon for TWF, but they still count as using additional hands. Which is what grappling cares about.

Two weapons!=two hands.

Slashing Grace prevents using more than one weapon during a full attack, and it also prevents hands other than the one attacking from being occupied (even passively). Grappling just prevents using more than one hand during a full attack. These two are not logically equivalent, and the FAQ doesn't suggest otherwise.

Being grappled preclude taking an "action that requires two hands to perform". It don't preclude the use of t or more limbs. It don't preclude Two Weapon Fighting. It preclude using a two handed weapon.

Two Weapon fighting don't use two hands at the same time. A claw/claw routine don't require the use of 2 claws at the same time, etc. etc.

This is not the 3rd edition where you were grappled by your arm.

@Calth
Slashing grace requirement is way more stringent than doing an action that "requires two hands to perform".

PRD wrote:


Slashing Grace (Combat)
...
You do not gain this benefit while fighting with two weapons or using flurry of blows, or any time another hand is otherwise occupied.

Flurry of blow can be done with 1 hand (or even one leg or elbow) but still block slashing grace. You can't apply that FAQ to the grappling rules as the starting limitation is way different.

@Quandary:

FAQ wrote:

Grapple: There are some contradictions between the various rules on grappling. What is correct?

To sum up the correct rules:

1) Grappling does not deny you your Dex bonus to AC, whether you are the grappler or the target.

2) A grappled creature can still make a full attack.

3) Being pinned does not make you flat-footed, but you are denied your Dex bonus.

Update: Page 195—In Table 8–6: Armor Class Modifiers, in the entry for Grappling, delete the superscript “1” after the +0 in the Melee and Ranged columns. In the third footnote, change “flat-footed and cannot add his Dexterity bonus” to “denied its Dexterity bonus”

Update: Page 201—In the If You Are Grappled section, in the fourth sentence, change “any action that requires only one hand to perform” to “any action that doesn’t require two hands to perform.” In the fourth sentence, change “make an attack with a light or one-handed weapon” to “make an attack or full attack with a light or one-handed weapon”

Update: Page 568—In the Pinned condition, in the second sentence, change “flat-footed” to “denied its Dexterity bonus.”

PRD wrote:
If You Are Grappled: If you are grappled, you can attempt to break the grapple as a standard action by making a combat maneuver check (DC equal to your opponent's CMD; this does not provoke an attack of opportunity) or Escape Artist check (with a DC equal to your opponent's CMD). If you succeed, you break the grapple and can act normally. Alternatively, if you succeed, you can become the grappler, grappling the other creature (meaning that the other creature cannot freely release the grapple without making a combat maneuver check, while you can). Instead of attempting to break or reverse the grapple, you can take any action that doesn't require two hands to perform, such as cast a spell or make an attack or full attack with a light or one-handed weapon against any creature within your reach, including the creature that is grappling you. See the grappled condition for additional details. If you are pinned, your actions are very limited. See the pinned condition in Conditions for additional details.


Well I was thinking of something more specific re: multiple natural weapon full attack,
but the rest of your post's reasoning, most especially the part about 2WF and the FAQ itself is spot on.

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