Fun For All


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Grand Lodge 5/5 5/5 Venture-Agent, Florida—Melbourne aka trollbill

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PFS is a hobby, and like all hobbies, people indulge in them because they enjoy doing so. So having fun is the single most important ingredient in PFS. It is the reason we are here and since PFS is a social game, the goal is for everyone at the table to have as much fun as possible. Much has been said about how GMs can make sure the players have fun, and how the players can make sure the other players at the table can have fun, but little has been said about how the players can make sure the GM has fun. Usually discussions of GMing involve words like “job” and “responsibility,” neither of which are commonly associated with “fun.”

To a degree, this lack of coverage makes sense. After all, you get more bang for your buck by making sure 3-7 players are happy rather than 1 GM. But that kind of ignores the fact that without that one GM, none of the players are going to have any fun. And it is my experience that an unhappy GM leads to unhappy players. So is it any wonder that you hear a lot of comments on these boards about areas having GM shortages?

Perhaps, just perhaps, if players put as much effort into making sure the GM has fun as the GM puts into making sure the players have fun, we might be able to reduce those GM shortage issues. So with that in mind, I will ask, without any finger pointing or blame gaming, what can players do to make the game more fun for the GM?

Sovereign Court

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*PAY* *ATTENTION* *WHEN* *THE* *GM* *IS* *READING* *BOX* *TEXT*

Grand Lodge 5/5 5/5 Venture-Lieutenant, Wisconsin—Madison aka Totenpfuhl

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Two things I can think of off the top of my head are:

1.) Know your character and what they can do.

2.) Offer to help with the initiative or organizing things. Don't expect the GM to ask, take the initiative, no pun intended.

Grand Lodge 4/5 Venture-Agent, Colorado—Denver aka roll4initiative

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I would like to see less complaining from players when a GM makes a ruling about, of all things, dice. I've had players whine because I didn't want them using edice. I've also had players whine about not using two ten siders for percentile dice. They wanted to roll a d20 instead (1-4 is 20%) or a d6 where odd is above 50%, even is under 50%. Yes, I am old school, but c'mon! Just use proper dice. It has made some arguements at the table which were really uncalled for.

Grand Lodge 4/5 Venture-Agent, Colorado—Denver aka roll4initiative

Quadstriker wrote:
*PAY* *ATTENTION* *WHEN* *THE* *GM* *IS* *READING* *BOX* *TEXT*

Totally!!!

Grand Lodge 5/5 5/5

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Give your character a personality, preferably one that is not a stereotype of your race and class. That said, don't overdo it and hog the spotlight or draw out the game.

And yes, please pay attention during the mission briefing. Ask questions if it doesn't seem clear. Take notes if you have to.

4/5

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Avoid looking at the GM as "the enemy."

When I GM, I expect the players to succeed and hope that they do. I see my role as to provide a fun and challenging environment. If they play smart and their dice don't run too cold (or mine too hot) then they should be fine. I'll even offer advice in sticky situations. Give me the benefit of the doubt that I'm not trying to force a TPK.

Grand Lodge 5/5 5/5 Venture-Agent, Florida—Melbourne aka trollbill

roll4initiative wrote:
I would like to see less complaining from players when a GM makes a ruling about, of all things, dice. I've had players whine because I didn't want them using edice. I've also had players whine about not using two ten siders for percentile dice. They wanted to roll a d20 instead (1-4 is 20%) or a d6 where odd is above 50%, even is under 50%. Yes, I am old school, but c'mon! Just use proper dice. It has made some arguements at the table which were really uncalled for.

Can we please phrase this in a manner that is less accusatory towards the players? I would prefer this did not devolve into a thread of GMs b~+#%ing about players and would much rather see genuine suggestions from both GMs and players as to what can be done to make the game more fun for GMs.

Silver Crusade

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Players: Please say "Thank you" to the GM at the end of the scenario. If the organizer is there, thank them too. If the owner is there, thank them for providing the space, maybe even buy something.

Grand Lodge 4/5 Venture-Agent, Colorado—Denver aka roll4initiative

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trollbill wrote:
roll4initiative wrote:
Rant about dice
Can we please phrase this in a manner that is less accusatory towards the players? I would prefer this did not devolve into a thread of GMs b&@@~ing about players and would much rather see genuine suggestions from both GMs and players as to what can be done to make the game more fun for GMs.

Ah, ok. Sorry.

To make the game more fun for the GM, players should come prepared. Know what your PC can do. Know your spells, special abilities, feats, and so on. Less time searching rulebooks during a game equals more fun for all.

Sovereign Court

The Fox wrote:
Players: Please say "Thank you" to the GM at the end of the scenario.

Very good one. I always make it a point to do so, but it seems a pretty uncommon courtesy. The GM puts in a lot of prep time and it takes a very small effort to let them know it has been appreciated.

I think this one goes under the "preaching to the choir" philosophy, because people reading this thread (and forum) are those who are more in-tune with making the experience a positive one for everyone - so let me put in another bullet point that I hope is obvious.

*Lead by example*

Sovereign Court 4/5 Venture-Lieutenant, Wisconsin—Pleasant Prairie aka Brew City Crafter

Quadstriker wrote:
*PAY* *ATTENTION* *WHEN* *THE* *GM* *IS* *READING* *BOX* *TEXT*

I would say that this is one of my biggest challenges, while DMing PFS.

When I sit down to run a PFS scenario I inform everyone that I have two rule.

#1. don't talk over me.

#2. don't talk over each other.

The players from our local lodge, that have been at my tables before, are familiar with these rules and know that if I suddenly stop in the middle of reading box text or answering a question, it is likely because someone is talking over me. This may go on for a few moments before another player tells him/her to zip it.

I've found these two rules are especially helpful/important at gaming conventions, where there are several tables going on in the same room.

Grand Lodge 5/5 5/5 Venture-Agent, Florida—Melbourne aka trollbill

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Brew City Crafter wrote:
Quadstriker wrote:
*PAY* *ATTENTION* *WHEN* *THE* *GM* *IS* *READING* *BOX* *TEXT*

I would say that this is one of my biggest challenges, while DMing PFS.

I have found that having the VC delivering the mission briefing give the interrupting PC(s) a PG-13 rated R. Lee Ermey style dress-down can be both entertaining and gets the message across.

Sczarni 5/5 5/55/5

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Pathfinder Starfinder Society Subscriber

Buy the GM a drink or snack ranks high on our local list.

Kelly Youngblood wrote:
Give your character a personality, preferably one that is not a stereotype of your race and class.

The first part of that is all we should really ask for.

Personality > No Personality

For some players, whether they be new to the game, or young, a stereotype is their method of entering into the genre. Their ability to RP different personalities will grow over time.

For such players that have no personality, I'll even recommend a stereotype for them to begin with. Kind of like a "baby's first steps".

Silver Crusade 5/5 5/5

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Don't constantly rules lawyer, ESPECIALLY when it really isn't important. The GM needs to be given at least a little slack in their interpretation. Assume that he is trying to make the game better for you.

On a related note, if the GM makes a ruling that you believe to be incorrect, politely raise your objection and then accept the GMs ruling.

Please don't bring in a wildly overpowered character. Or, if you feel that you must do so, please underplay that character until necessary. Let the GM do at least a bit of damage to you and the party :-).

Keep your head in the game. Pay attention to what is happening, be ready when it is your turn, minimize extraneous conversation, etc.


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pauljathome wrote:

Please don't bring in a wildly overpowered character. Or, if you feel that you must do so, please underplay that character until necessary. Let the GM do at least a bit of damage to you and the party :-).

This! I could care less except if one player dominates every encounter then the other players get to do nothing which directly detracts from what the GM is supposed to be accomplishing.

5/5 5/55/5 Venture-Captain, Germany—Hamburg

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pauljathome wrote:
Don't constantly rules lawyer, ESPECIALLY when it really isn't important.

On a related point, don't question NPC tactics too much. Sometimes an NPC is supposed to not care about the well-being of his/her allies. It's all part of the encounter's difficulty, so don't tell the GM he's using bad tactics as if he's doing things wrong. Sometimes bad tactics are just intended.

Also, don't use player knowledge when the character doesn't have such knowledge, especially in evergreens, where players can know what happens without ever having run the scenario.
(I had a player who had his character kick a certain chest multiple times in First Steps 1 because he (as a player) knew it was an illusion.)

Not talking over the GM reading box text is also important. It doesn't even have to be box text. When the GM announces something, players shouldn't talk among each other. Same goes for when a player asks the GM something or wants to declare what their character is doing. The GM would like to understand what the players tell them, and that gets very difficult if someone else talks loudly.

Silver Crusade

The OP asked that we keep this thread positive. Please post "DO" statements instead of "DO NOT" statements. :) Have a nice day.

Silver Crusade

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Without Don'ts this is gonna be difficult because there are things some people do which they don't even realize as bad which makes wording them in a positive manner difficult... But I'll try.
Also, I'm talking about a perfect world here. I'm aware that there are horrible, horrible GMs and players out there.

DO accept the GMs rulings if they aren't really, really important. It's not important whether a DR 2/bludgeoning soaks up a magic missile or not if the combat is going well otherwise. Adress it, but if it's minor and you don't have a rule very clearly saying otherwise at hand it can wait until after the game. Or maybe send an email after the game.

DO try to get a hint. The time slots are sometimes quite small and having an extended conversation with shop keep #342 might be very atmospheric, but it's really not important for the scenario whether the last week was particularly rainy and Shawn's youngest is getting his teeth and oh, the count is such a nice young men, bless his heart if your goal is a temple 40 miles north of the town.

DO help out other players. If there is a new guy who considers grappling the enemy and you know it beforehand find the page before his turn if he hasn't done it himself yet. Most GMs I know are juggling multiple books behind the screen, the less the better.

And one DON'T, sorry, have to do it:

DON'T throw a hissy-fit if your dice are just against you. The GM is just doing his "job", he sucked it up last time when you one-shotted the final boss and the time before when the combat he was really hyped up about was over in the surprise round because the witch's slumber put the villain asleep. Now it's not going your way, deal with it.

Grand Lodge 4/5 Venture-Agent, Nevada—Las Vegas aka kinevon

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Kelly Youngblood wrote:

Give your character a personality, preferably one that is not a stereotype of your race and class. That said, don't overdo it and hog the spotlight or draw out the game.

And yes, please pay attention during the mission briefing. Ask questions even if it seems clear. Take notes!

FTFY

Sovereign Court

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I'm pretty much the only person I ever see taking notes, but it's part of the fun for me. I'll even write down a funny joke that someone makes during a session. Now I've got a whole notebook that's a collection of stories and good times - almost like... a chronicle of pathfinders. <.<


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If my players are sitting on the edge of their seats worried their characters are about to die (despite obviously not being in any real danger!) I'm a happy GM. :D

Shadow Lodge

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If I'm GMing, I don't want anyone to buy me anything :)

If you're a player getting involved in playing without waiting for people to ask you what you're doing (and yeah, being quiet during box text), you're doing it right.

Bonus points if you roleplay your character to pieces or getting worked up over something in the game that results in more comedy for the table (my favourite is "okay, I aim for the big guy in the back and... (drop dice) MISFIRE! dammit!").

Silver Crusade

Quadstriker wrote:
I'm pretty much the only person I ever see taking notes, but it's part of the fun for me. I'll even write down a funny joke that someone makes during a session. Now I've got a whole notebook that's a collection of stories and good times - almost like... a chronicle of pathfinders. <.<

I have the feeling my players are getting used to the idea that taking notes might be a good idea. They screwed up their Secondary Success Conditions two times now because they weren't exactly attentive during the mission briefing, took "We absolutly need X, best way to do it is Y, so please do that" as "Do Y, that's your mission", forgot about X the second it was mentioned (every time it was mentioned) and really didn't achieve the greater goal of the Society in that mission.

On the other hand, they have been saved one or two times by the one player who TOOK notes and said "Hey guys, remember we've got two more days, how about we do this thing that was mentioned?" - carrot and stick and all that ;)

Sczarni 5/5 5/55/5

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Pathfinder Starfinder Society Subscriber
Quadstriker wrote:
I'm pretty much the only person I ever see taking notes, but it's part of the fun for me. I'll even write down a funny joke that someone makes during a session. Now I've got a whole notebook that's a collection of stories and good times - almost like... a chronicle of pathfinders. <.<

I write notes on the back of the prior session's Chronicle Sheet.

Back when Faction missions were being retired, one of the main points Mike brought up was that every time he asked someone what their last Faction mission was, nobody seemed able to recall.

After reading that I thought to myself, "He should have asked ME! I have every one written down!"

Grand Lodge 3/5 Venture-Agent, Washington—Bellevue aka Divvox2

illyume wrote:
If my players are sitting on the edge of their seats worried their characters are about to die (despite obviously not being in any real danger!) I'm a happy GM. :D

I suddenly feel a lot better about the games I've run...

Dark Archive 3/5

Please let the GM *read* the box text for an area before bombarding them with questions, requests for perception checks, etc.!

I second the request to take notes!

And finally, you have something weird/strange, show it to me before it comes up! You're going to have a better player experience when I can narrate things as they would actually occur based on the PCs in play.

Silver Crusade 5/5 5/55/5 Venture-Captain, Germany—Bavaria

I after having an employer, that figuatively beat into us that taking notes is wrong, and that you should actively listen... for sever years... well I still took notes, but what I write down and how is a bit complicated.

One of the reasons I kinda dislike all those "players only get their second PP if they took notes" things is, that I usually can recall anything in the adventure, and we usually take pains to leave the dungeon ready for the next team.... ... and I will never ever forget monsters with the young template, especially in cases where it makes them better (Damn you Kyle!^^).

Silver Crusade

To be fair - if a player states clearly that his character takes extensive notes about the room they're in or draws a map I don't know many GMs who'd say "Yup, but you have to do it OUTSIDE THE GAME as well!"
Hell, most would probably let it slide if a character says in the debriefing "Hey, we found lots of interesting stuff, there were runes and a trap and one room where you could-" and let the VC say "Hold on, just write it down and turn it in, k?"

Silver Crusade 5/5 5/55/5 Venture-Captain, Germany—Bavaria

Well I printed the handouts for a certain replayable scenarios and even with 6 of those, I didn't get all that many notes..

Grand Lodge 5/5 5/5 Venture-Agent, Florida—Melbourne aka trollbill

I am seeing lots of good ideas on how to make the GMs job easier and how to avoid decreasing their fun. I was hoping for a few more ideas on actually increasing it. Something that actually makes the position more desirable, not just more bearable.

(Yes, I realize that is a lot harder to do. That is why I am doing this brainstorming thread.)

Scarab Sages 4/5

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber

I wanted to respond to the thread title with "And All For Fun!"
But that's because it's early and I haven't had my coffee yet.

Add a little flavor to your actions (as players). Describe what you're doing a little bit when making a die roll. This can make it easier for the GM to work with you and add to the flavor of the encounter.

And double agree with Thank the GM. It has become a good habit in our area, and a good polite acknowledgement of the work that goes into it. Also complement your GM if they do something particularly well or challenging. We all need encouragement and positive reinforcement.

Silver Crusade 5/5 5/5

Roleplay interesting characters who interact with my NPCs and the world as their characters would. If you let my NPCs talk a bunch I'll have fun.

Come up with truly unusual tactics which make me think about how to handle things. Unusual is NOT "take advantage of some rules loophole" but more thinking outside the box.

Have fun. Fun is contagious. If you're visibly enjoying yourself I likely will too

Shadow Lodge 4/5

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Re: Paying Attention Box text

I feel like there's a confluence of factors here.

1) Players may be still be settling down and dialing into their full-on gaming mode and may not be 100% mentally present.

2) Some GMs are atrocious box text readers (droning tone, mumbling, etc).

3) Some box texts are overly long and overstuffed with information.

As a GM, I make a point to have the NPC recap the main takeaways at the end of the briefing ("Just to be clear, Pathfinders, find the Foozle, save Sir Wooble and DON'T HARM THE NATIVES.")

As a player, I make a point to ask the GM if I understood the briefing correctly ("So, we need to find the Foozle, save Sir...uh...who again? Wooble. Gotcha. And don't kill the natives. Oh, "harm"? What exactly does "harm" entail?")

5/5

Good point on the box text - sometimes writers don't write for read-aloud as well as they write for GMs. I tend to paraphrase the box text, and deliver only the in-character bits. I don't need to say, "Ambrus Valsin scratches his nose and looks around and says..." - I just scratch my own nose and say it. Makes the text go by faster, and keeps it to just the essential information.

The recap is a good idea as well. I have seen some GMs actually hand out a summery of the briefing in printed form, but I feel that's just enabling behavior.

On note-taking: we did a Special a few years back where we offered an out-of-game prize for the best character journal, and the stuff we got back was amazing! 3-D perspective maps, prose, diagrams, and lots of notes. NOt only was it cool, but it helped play since people didn't have to ask "who was that again?" every few minutes. I wish there was an in-game way to reward this sort of "Pathfinder-y" behavior. Maybe next year's faction cards?

Silver Crusade 5/5 5/55/5 Venture-Captain, Germany—Bavaria

I usually tend to paraphrase the box text, or improvise a little RP into it - (I loved GMing the Comfirmation, and I was so close to actually climb on a table ^^) - but that comes party from the need to translate everything.

With one little exception, I think the box text at the start of the Overlow Archive needs to be read in full ^^

EDIT: If I had to do boil it down to two points:

-Players make sure not to overdo it with the cheese, at least let the GM deal a little bit of damage here and there, so the combat doesn't feel like a complete waste of time.

-Have fun, interact with each other, and try to be awesome. If my players are happy, chances are very good that I will be happy too (unless I GM Emerald Spire 3-4 again, a pretty miserable experience for the GM).

4/5

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Sammy T wrote:
As a player, I make a point to ask the GM if I understood the briefing correctly ("So, we need to find the Foozle, save Sir...uh...who again? Wooble. Gotcha. And don't kill the natives. Oh, "harm"? What exactly does "harm" entail?")

Just wanted to highlight this as something a player can do to make my experience as a GM better. It tells me they're paying attention and that they know what they're supposed to be doing.

Other things players can do:

*Table tents! Helps me remember who's who. Bonus points when it has a picture of their mini so I can attach a name to a miniature face.

*Call out natural 1s and 20s. You don't need to calculate your save on either.

*Call me by my name. I'm not "GM." I introduced myself when we all sat down. Write it down if you have to. Ask me again if you have to.

Sovereign Court

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Sammy T wrote:

Re: Paying Attention Box text

I feel like there's a confluence of factors here.

1) Players may be still be settling down and dialing into their full-on gaming mode and may not be 100% mentally present.

2) Some GMs are atrocious box text readers (droning tone, mumbling, etc).

3) Some box texts are overly long and overstuffed with information.

You make very good points.

I submit that the GM will have more fun if the GM is properly prepared!
*THIS INCLUDES BEING PREPARED TO READ THE BOXED TEXT*

If the first time you're saying a complicated name out loud is while giving the briefing in the game and you stumble through it, pronounce it three different ways during the same briefing, and generally do a crappy job of introducing a place or person of importance, you were not prepared, your players won't be able to digest the information, remember names, and *the game will be less fun*.

Those names of places and people. Say them. Out loud. Before the game. Yes many of them will have arguably several different ways to pronounce them. Make sure you know what you're going with before it starts to come out of your mouth.

Silver Crusade 5/5 5/55/5 Venture-Captain, Germany—Bavaria

redward wrote:
Sammy T wrote:
As a player, I make a point to ask the GM if I understood the briefing correctly ("So, we need to find the Foozle, save Sir...uh...who again? Wooble. Gotcha. And don't kill the natives. Oh, "harm"? What exactly does "harm" entail?")

Just wanted to highlight this as something a player can do to make my experience as a GM better. It tells me they're paying attention and that they know what they're supposed to be doing.

Other things players can do:

*Table tents! Helps me remember who's who. Bonus points when it has a picture of their mini so I can attach a name to a miniature face.

*Call out natural 1s and 20s. You don't need to calculate your save on either.

*Call me by my name. I'm not "GM." I introduced myself when we all sat down. Write it down if you have to. Ask me again if you have to.

Good suggestions, but can't your players just preface everything with:"

Oh mighty GM, we are unworthy to sit at your noble tables....."? ^^

Sovereign Court

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Another way I like to initiate fun as the GM is by being proactive during character introductions (I find these important and dislike when GMs or the players themselves gloss over them).

After a player finishes their short introduction, I try to always give them a personality driven question that will give everyone some more additional insight and also get those RP motors running.

For instance, a burly half-orc fighter named Grog introduces himself and mentions that he's a brewer (with the appropriate profession). After he completes his intro, I, as the GM, might say something like "Thank you, Grog. Has anyone ever told you to your face that they didn't like your beer? How did you react?"

Now the player has a whole litany of responses that can give us some character insight. Did he laugh it off? Did he threaten them? Smash them with a tankard? Has no one ever dared to say such a thing? We get a nice glimpse into the character and that whole question and answer takes maybe 10 seconds. And now the more talented roleplayers at the table have another hook to pick up on and play with later.

Lantern Lodge 5/5

Sebastian Hirsch wrote:
redward wrote:
Sammy T wrote:
As a player, I make a point to ask the GM if I understood the briefing correctly ("So, we need to find the Foozle, save Sir...uh...who again? Wooble. Gotcha. And don't kill the natives. Oh, "harm"? What exactly does "harm" entail?")

Just wanted to highlight this as something a player can do to make my experience as a GM better. It tells me they're paying attention and that they know what they're supposed to be doing.

Other things players can do:

*Table tents! Helps me remember who's who. Bonus points when it has a picture of their mini so I can attach a name to a miniature face.

*Call out natural 1s and 20s. You don't need to calculate your save on either.

*Call me by my name. I'm not "GM." I introduced myself when we all sat down. Write it down if you have to. Ask me again if you have to.

Good suggestions, but can't your players just preface everything with:"

Oh mighty GM, we are unworthy to sit at your noble tables....."? ^^

"Oh Captain, My Captain" works as well. Doubly so if you stand on your chair.

Sovereign Court 4/5 5/5 Venture-Lieutenant, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

Quadstriker wrote:
Sammy T wrote:

Re: Paying Attention Box text

I feel like there's a confluence of factors here.

1) Players may be still be settling down and dialing into their full-on gaming mode and may not be 100% mentally present.

2) Some GMs are atrocious box text readers (droning tone, mumbling, etc).

3) Some box texts are overly long and overstuffed with information.

You make very good points.

I submit that the GM will have more fun if the GM is properly prepared!
*THIS INCLUDES BEING PREPARED TO READ THE BOXED TEXT*

If the first time you're saying a complicated name out loud is while giving the briefing in the game and you stumble through it, pronounce it three different ways during the same briefing, and generally do a crappy job of introducing a place or person of importance, you were not prepared, your players won't be able to digest the information, remember names, and *the game will be less fun*.

Those names of places and people. Say them. Out loud. Before the game. Yes many of them will have arguably several different ways to pronounce them. Make sure you know what you're going with before it starts to come out of your mouth.

This is a good idea.

Another thing you can achieve by pre-reading the boxed text, is to act out the behaviour of the VC ("he glowers at the PCs") rather than read it aloud.

Sovereign Court 4/5 5/5 Venture-Lieutenant, Netherlands—Leiden aka Ascalaphus

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I think one tricky trick for player to pull off is to give the GM the enjoyment of showing off his boss monster, without actually succumbing too much to it.

Lots of adventures have some monster that does something quite cool. But if it gets one-shot in the first round, or shut down with so much suppression spells that it can't decide what's up and down, then the GM never gets to show off.

I'm still looking for the best way to do this; I don't want to die of course, so while I want to give the villain his day in the sun, I still want to come out of the encounter alright. I'm looking for a way to improve my defences, instead of crippling the enemy.

Scarab Sages 5/5 5/5 Venture-Captain, Netherlands aka Woran

Sebastian Hirsch wrote:

I usually tend to paraphrase the box text, or improvise a little RP into it - (I loved GMing the Comfirmation, and I was so close to actually climb on a table ^^) - but that comes party from the need to translate everything.

Props. I dont mean come in full costume. But if you have something that makes your character unique, bring that. Got a drawing done of your character? Show it during your introduction.

Picked up a trophy or have a weird item with you the whole time? Put it on the table. Its easier for your teammates and the GM to act on it and bring it up during roleplay if there is a physical reminder.

I, as a GM, have a ridiculous night cap I wear whenever I GM the Night March of Kalkamedes.

Silver Crusade 5/5 5/55/5 Venture-Captain, Germany—Bavaria

Quadstriker wrote:

Another way I like to initiate fun as the GM is by being proactive during character introductions (I find these important and dislike when GMs or the players themselves gloss over them).

After a player finishes their short introduction, I try to always give them a personality driven question that will give everyone some more additional insight and also get those RP motors running.

For instance, a burly half-orc fighter named Grog introduces himself and mentions that he's a brewer (with the appropriate profession). After he completes his intro, I, as the GM, might say something like "Thank you, Grog. Has anyone ever told you to your face that they didn't like your beer? How did you react?"

Now the player has a whole litany of responses that can give us some character insight. Did he laugh it off? Did he threaten them? Smash them with a tankard? Has no one ever dared to say such a thing? We get a nice glimpse into the character and that whole question and answer takes maybe 10 seconds. And now the more talented roleplayers at the table have another hook to pick up on and play with later.

I have experimented with the tactic to ask players to tell the other players at the table, what the other pathfinders would know about their character (things they might have seen or heard around the grand lodge/at all those local taverns where the society was founded) -> I think it helps players to RP.


Well I haven't seen it. So I will suggest it.

Players should try their hand at GMing to give the GM a chance to play a character once and a while.

My local GM just mention last session he need a break from GMing. I would volunteer, but I am quite new to Pathfinder. As of today I only played 4 sessions.


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The biggest thing I think I do to help gm's is getting the group back on track so they don't have to. Either by just slightly loudly reestablishing the mission and progress or just happening to mention the time any time the gm begins to cool down from side talk isa big help.
If the gm is doing a "job" then it's not right for us to constantly stop him from being able to adequately complete it.

The Exchange 5/5

use dice everyone can read - even from across the table. that way everyone can enjoy your rolls too (cheer on the 20s, cry on the 1s)

Pay attention, play and have fun, and let everyone else know how much fun you are having - without going overboard (that could be creepy!).

Laugh out loud (esp. at the judges jokes)

Smile. It helps. really.

Sovereign Court

nosig wrote:
use dice everyone can read - even from across the table. that way everyone can enjoy your rolls too (cheer on the 20s, cry on the 1s)

I'm big on this too! I enjoy it when die rolls are a shared experience.

Shadow Lodge 5/5 5/5 Regional Venture-Coordinator, Northwest aka WalterGM

jtaylor73003 wrote:

Well I haven't seen it. So I will suggest it.

Players should try their hand at GMing to give the GM a chance to play a character once and a while.

My local GM just mention last session he need a break from GMing. I would volunteer, but I am quite new to Pathfinder. As of today I only played 4 sessions.

Good on you for offering to step up! That's the kind of attitude I like seeing from new players.

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