Character Lying to His Own Party


Advice


Okay, I have a weird character concept which I think will be fun to play. My concerns are: 1)How to make sure this works within the party without sabotaging it 2) How to best make this work.

Here's the character concept. I am playing within PFS, so all such rules apply. My character will be a sylph (I have two such racial boons) and I was going to go elemental (air) bloodline sorcerer. however, I stumbled across crossblooded and decided to add in Rakshasa as well. This makes him an excellent liar. 6 times per day, he gets to add +5 to a bluff check.
My character will never enter a party admitting that he is a sorcerer. Instead, I am planning to create 3 alter egos for him and have him pretend to be these when we do character intros (I'm thinking a bard, a monk, and maybe a magus...I have the ideas for them, but I don't want to put full backstories/etc. here unless they're really necessary). Thinking less of party members and doing this as a test of their aptitude seems a very Rakshasa thing to do, so I like that. As I start the character intro, I'll roll my bluff check. As soon as I finish, I'll have everyone else roll a sense motive. If they're high enough, they figure out he's lying, he congratulates them and adventures with them as a sorcerer. If not, he goes into the adventure under his pretense of whatever character he pretended to be (though never carrying it through in situations where it would mean risking the lives of party members or the mission itself...he can always claim he did UMD with a wand or something if needed).
Before starting the adventure, I'd touch base with the GM so he/she will be in on the ruse. I'll then have some prepared notecards (and blanks just in case) to let the GM know when I do things like cast a touch spell and just hold the charge so my "monk" can do hand-to-hand combat.
So, the questions remain:
1) How do I best make this work within a party setting?
2) How do I best make this work in general?
3) Do you have other thoughts/suggestions?

Scarab Sages

This will not work well in organized play. Other players don't need to know your abilities, but they should know your combat role. If you tell people you are a bard and you don't inspire courage, you'll likely get some raised eyebrows, and your antics may eat into table time. The bluff check vs party members can be considered PVP and against the rules, and at the very least might annoy other players.

It's an idea that works better in a home game.

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Pawns Subscriber

What Imbicatus said. Organized play is like Arcade mode. If you look like a fighter, you should act like a fighter. Don't forget that in PFS, you're all professional agents sent on a mission by a Venture-Captain. The Venture-Captain will have a file on you as to what your abilities are, otherwise why would he even recruit you? Part of mission briefing is to lay out what each mission member's task and role will be.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

As a team player and strategy-minded guy, I'd despise that. I want to know who's got what, what their strengths and weaknesses are, and how they can be best deployed so I can support them. I'm usually in the role of the party's God Wizard and part-time buffer so those things are important for me to keep in mind.

Fluff and roleplay are different, and I'm cool with supporting that, in character. Playing "guess what's on my character sheet? Hee hee!" is just going to make me want to vote you off the island.

I don't play PFS, but this wouldn't even fly in the home games I participate in.


Thing is there's a difference between your character withholding information from other player characters and you withholding information from other players. The former can make for a really fun in joke among the players as long as they know that it's an obvious lie and they know what the truth is. As others have mentioned, the latter can be problematic for the party and can start you off on the wrong foot with other players.

It seems like a fun character idea but personally I think it would be a little more fun if you let other players in on joke so they can appreciate your cleverness as opposed to being vexed by it.


pippinTook wrote:
...he can always claim he did UMD with a wand or something if needed).

That won't work. If anyone has spellcraft they will know you actually cast a spell even if you have a wand in one of your hands.

Also tricking the characters is one thing. Tricking the players is not really a good idea.

At higher levels when you will have access to certain spells it will be much harder to pull off especially against the players. It might also be dangerous for your character. If you get into melee and they think you are a monk or magus they may not come over to bail you out. At least if they know you are a caster they might try to get over in time to save you.

The Exchange

I've told my party my hexcrafter is a witch and even dressed the part. Nothing untoward has come out of that so far. Its been...7 levels already?

Maybe try classes that are quite similar in abilities, and those classes that don't have unique abilities. You can't tell a sorcerer and a wizard apart, for example, and with razmiran priest archtype and lots of umd, you might be able to pass as a cleric of gozreh/a druid. I wouldnt, without metagaming be able to tell a ranger from a fighter esp if ranger does not show up with animal companion. Doubt anyone can tell the difference between an alchemist or an investigator.

Classes with too iconic abilities are hard to bluff as, ie magi, bards, rogues, ninjas, etc.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Yea I am definantely in the 'this probably isnt a good idea for organized play' camp. Even in home games, lying to the party is messy. Particularly if the players arent in on it. If a player wants to have some kind of secret in one of my games, we generally have a fairly significant talk as a group, maybe not completely revealing it, but giving the other players a heads up that some weird stuff is going to be going on. But generally that requires a strong bond in and out of game. If you do this with both players and characters you barely know, its going to create problems when they notice you are lying to them. Even if you fess up, your reliability falls into question


Lots of really good feedback. I had definitely had some concerns about how this might play out for other players, so it's good to have the input. Personally, I'd enjoy knowing something was up (the sense motive check) and then trying to puzzle it out, but I wasn't sure how other might feel.
Seems like some are leaning towards let the players know, but play off the deception with the characters. That could be fun. My main thing here is wanting to have a fun/interesting character for me to role play while also making sure everyone else can enjoy him.
So, if I were to try to float this out there as a character-only deception with players in on the joke, how would it be best/most logical to play this out?

EDIT: Adding in my original thoughts, I was going to have him present himself as a bard archetype (to avoid the expectation of inspire courage bonuses), a monk (using touch spells in melee), and as a magus (either going in with a touch spell and alternating with his sickle, eventually getting the Silverhex, or using spiked gauntlets to do touch spells "through a weapon")

Sovereign Court

1 person marked this as a favorite.

You could even have the character think they're something other than they are. I had a tiefling sorceror once (draconic bloodline aimed at DD) who was convinced he was a half-dragon. After all - he had claws/sharp teeth, scales, and he'd been raised by a dragon(who knew what he was and wanted him as a follower) after being driven out of his home village. Of course he was a half-dragon!

The character might think that his powers come from his amazing martial arts/ki. Maybe he took the equivilent of a self defense class when he were a pre-teen, right as their sorceror abilities started to manifest. Why wouldn't he think that the two were linked?

You could even fluff it that his somatic components are awkward looking kung-fu moves. In his mind they're required to 'focus his ki'. Mechanically it'd be no different than any other sorceror - and the players could get a chuckle about how odd the character is. He could certainly bluff any character without knowledge:arcana into agreeing with him.


Charon's Little Helper wrote:

You could even have the character think they're something other than they are. I had a tiefling sorceror once (draconic bloodline aimed at DD) who was convinced he was a half-dragon. After all - he had claws/sharp teeth, scales, and he'd been raised by a dragon(who knew what he was and wanted him as a follower) after being driven out of his home village. Of course he was a half-dragon!

The character might think that his powers come from his amazing martial arts/ki. Maybe he took the equivilent of a self defense class when he were a pre-teen, right as their sorceror abilities started to manifest. Why wouldn't he think that the two were linked?

You could even fluff it that his somatic components are awkward looking kung-fu moves. In his mind they're required to 'focus his ki'. Mechanically it'd be no different than any other sorceror - and the players could get a chuckle about how odd the character is. He could certainly bluff any character without knowledge:arcana into agreeing with him.

Hillariously, my daughter has an elemental bloodline sorceress who thinks she's draconic! Great minds think alike, right?

So, it's an excellent suggestion, but since she's already doing it, I won't use it.

Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder First Edition / Advice / Character Lying to His Own Party All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.