Curious about reactions: Friend turns out to be a villain.


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Say you have good friend. You hang out, have fun together, and talked about your problems to each other.

Then you find out this friend has cribbed from your tech notes, stolen from the company you both work for, robbed a couple of places, and as a favor to you attempts to murder the hypotenuse of a love triangle you happen to be in.

How do you react? Would you still consider this person a friend?


??????????

The Exchange

only if he does not share the $$$

cause sharing is caring


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countchocula wrote:

only if he does not share the $$$

cause sharing is caring

Sharing is caring....snacks anyone?

Shadow Lodge

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Alright, I'll bite.

I'd probably feel excessively betrayed and hurt, to start with. After that would come worry and paranoia: the friendship, such as it is, seems more akin to an arrangement of convenience on the "friend's" part. If this is how s/he treats you when they consider you a "friend", the instant you're no longer considered such means all bets are off.

Me personally, I'd hope I had the guts to confront them about this and get some answers. Stealing and (attempted) murder are definitely not on the list of favors I'm okay with my "friends" doing.

... that said, I'd make sure I had another friend, one I felt was more trustworthy, along as backup. If this is how the "friend" behaves when we're on good terms with one another, I'd be worried what they'd do when confronted.


O_o
I errr...?
I hope we are talking about a game here right? If not that sounds more like inform police than confronting them.


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I guess....In front of my friend, I'd be apparently okay with their crime spree ways, though I'd say "Dude, my notes? Really? That's just cold" in a joking manner. I'd suggest he NOT kill the love triangle member, cause I like to win it fairly, and my friend risks getting himself caught. As for stealing from the company, I'd say he's his own man, and can do as he pleases, but I'd warn him of the consequences.

I'd then try constantly to subtly dissuade him from being a bad guy, in the hopes that be could be redeemed from villainy.

On the inside, I'd be paranoid as all hell, but trying to maintain the situation, and always be vigilant for my own safety, and the safety of others.


I think I'd call the cops...if you don't and they catch him, you may find out that you're on trial too!


Seriously, if you have reason to believe that your alleged friend is actually out to kill someone and you don't inform the police you are potentially liable for prosecution either as a co-conspirator or under the "aiding and abetting" laws. Any residual feelings you might have for this psychic vampire aren't worth the potential down side to the third member of the triangle and yourself. Pick up the phone, call the police.


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I'd be all, like, "Dude, why didn't you tell me earlier, we coulda been hanging out this whole time!" and then induct him (or her) into my supervillain crew and take new confidence in my plans to ransom the Empire State Building for a million dollars.


This is for fiction but I didn't think that needed mentioning. Sorry about that.


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That's not the kind of drama we're looking for!


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Well then. That makes it all clearer. It would depend largely on the character of both involved, especially the not-villain party. It could range from a cautious or even proud acceptance, to loathing and judgement and severing the ties completely.


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Dude...you should have made clear this was fiction from the beginning.

as someone who had friends and now relatives that have flouted the law on occasion, I would take a "from this day forth" perspective. Don't know what happened in the past and dont care really -although the note thing hurts. Please do your best to keep your nose clean, despite temptation to the contrary.


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Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

When it comes to the attempted murder, I think the character needs a really good reason to not go to the police. It happens all the time in fiction but it doesnt happen all the time in real life and (for me at least) it always presents as a jarring moment in the story - unless there's a really good reason for not trusting in the authorities. Ignoring (or self-policing) the theft is more believable - people tolerate theft all the time.

I dont think I'd consider someone like that a 'real' friend anymore, but it would depend on the nature of the relationship. If all of this stuff was the kind of thing I'd have expected him to tell me, then I'd really doubt the rest of what we'd shared. If we were just friends due to a shared hobby or something then perhaps that would continue.

Dishonesty, particularly to that level, makes friendship difficult. Seeing murder as an acceptable solution to a love-triangle would lead me to suspect sociopathy and makes friendship dangerous.


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Ceaser Slaad wrote:
Seriously, if you have reason to believe that your alleged friend is actually out to kill someone and you don't inform the police you are potentially liable for prosecution either as a co-conspirator or under the "aiding and abetting" laws. [snip]

For your reference for your story, this isn't true. You need to take actions in furtherance of the act to be prosecuted for accomplice before the fact. Simply knowing of its existence is not sufficient for culpability.


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MeanDM wrote:
Ceaser Slaad wrote:
Seriously, if you have reason to believe that your alleged friend is actually out to kill someone and you don't inform the police you are potentially liable for prosecution either as a co-conspirator or under the "aiding and abetting" laws. [snip]

For your reference for your story, this isn't true. You need to take actions in furtherance of the act to be prosecuted for accomplice before the fact. Simply knowing of its existence is not sufficient for culpability.

I strongly suspect that it depends on which jurisdiction one is in and how obnoxious the Prosecutor chooses to be about it. Given that we have people posting on this board from literally all over the world, taking a better safe than sorry approach is the only reasonable alternative.

In the (fortunately hypothetical) case in question the alleged victim to be is part of a love triangle between the poster, the potential murderer and the victim. The Prosecutor could argue that this establishes a "motive" for the poster to go along with the crime. While that is arguably flimsy, a Prosecutor in certain jurisdictions could potentially put the poster through hell just because. And all that is assuming the murderer doesn't decide to implicate the poster in order to get a lighter sentence if he got caught.

Heck, even here in America, actions which would be perfectly legal in one jurisdiction could get your rump thrown in jail with a felony conviction in the county or state next door.


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Look, I might have stolen some things, and borrowed your notes, and yes, I totally tried to kill that guy you were complaining about... but that doesn't mean that I don't care.

I mean, friends help friends move, but best friends help move bodies, right? So come on, let's get you a drink (company's treat), and plan an alibi for you to have when your life gets "decomplicated".


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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Ceaser Slaad wrote:
MeanDM wrote:
Ceaser Slaad wrote:
Seriously, if you have reason to believe that your alleged friend is actually out to kill someone and you don't inform the police you are potentially liable for prosecution either as a co-conspirator or under the "aiding and abetting" laws. [snip]

For your reference for your story, this isn't true. You need to take actions in furtherance of the act to be prosecuted for accomplice before the fact. Simply knowing of its existence is not sufficient for culpability.

I strongly suspect that it depends on which jurisdiction one is in and how obnoxious the Prosecutor chooses to be about it. Given that we have people posting on this board from literally all over the world, taking a better safe than sorry approach is the only reasonable alternative.

In the (fortunately hypothetical) case in question the alleged victim to be is part of a love triangle between the poster, the potential murderer and the victim. The Prosecutor could argue that this establishes a "motive" for the poster to go along with the crime. While that is arguably flimsy, a Prosecutor in certain jurisdictions could potentially put the poster through hell just because. And all that is assuming the murderer doesn't decide to implicate the poster in order to get a lighter sentence if he got caught.

Heck, even here in America, actions which would be perfectly legal in one jurisdiction could get your rump thrown in jail with a felony conviction in the county or state next door.

As a lawyer, I can tell you motive is helpful for a conviction, but not ensconced in statutes. What you are talking about are Good Samaritan statues, which have a particularly troubled history in enforcement.

Accessory or attempt requires substantive action in furtherance of a crime. That really doesn't change from one jurisdiction to another.

This is specific enough that I feel I should add that while I'm a lawyer, I'm not your lawyer. Please contact a local attorney for advice on specific issues.


I wouldn't have let things get that far (dishonesty means I take out the friendship scissors and cut ties), but I assume that this scenario means that I've only discovered these things recently about my friend. Even so there's only one answer: sever contact with her and explain why. Make sure that she can't reach me and possibly take out a restraining order. I don't want to be involved in her theft and I sure as hell don't need her "help" with partners.

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