Best Adventure Path


Pathfinder Adventure Path General Discussion


My kids (9 & 12) want to play Pathfinder. About a year ago, we played through part of Rise of the Runelords, which they liked a lot, but they want to do something different. My wife will be playing too, so it's likely going to be a party of 3. The 9 year old is talking about being a a Druid.

At their ages railroading is actually a plus. Light NPC interactions are good, but heavy roleplaying is not really their thing. Interesting combat or problem-solving encounters are the best. On the other hand, my wife doesn't really enjoy lengthy/tactics-heavy combat encounters (problem-solving is again a big plus). Situations that put characters in difficult moral situations aren't great for the kids; clear good versus evil is ideal.

And it would nice if the AP worked pretty well out-of-the-box since they want to start soon, but I understand having a party of 3 will require some modifications.

I was looking at Wrath of the Righteous or Reign of Winter, both of which seem to have good reviews. I thought I'd crowdsource my thinking and see what the wider world thinks.

Thanks.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Reign of Winter! (my wife and kids love this one, very kid friendly with just a few tweaks)

Not Wrath (it has tons of NPC interaction and gets crazy complicated with the Mythic Adventures rules)

my wife and kids (ages 10 & 3.5) love Iron Gods above all others:) it is really good and the Sci-Fi elements really get them excited (also get the Technology Guide, its worth it!)


NO wrath of the righteous!
I suggest Jade Regent (just ditch the caravan rules).


Whilst Jade Regent is awesome, I would actually suggest Shattered Star in this instance. It's kind of a sequel to Rise of the Runelords so some themes will be familiar to your players but it's also very dungeon heavy with light NPC interaction. The encounters are varied and not all just straight combat, lots of traps and puzzles which I think your group would enjoy very much.


Kingmaker, as a sandbox adventure, allows you to personalize the AP as much or as little as you like. The exploration factor may appeal to your kids and running their "home" may make your life as a parent a bit easier as they see what it's like.

Crimson Throne has a mission-based system if that's too open for you. It's pretty interesting, with a bad "mom" antagonist.

Both of those can be too RP-focused for you.

If that's the case, the Osirion adventure of Mummy's Mask looks like a real winner for you: delving focused, but still flavorful pulp feel.

Silver Crusade

captain yesterday wrote:

Reign of Winter! (my wife and kids love this one, very kid friendly with just a few tweaks)

Not Wrath (it has tons of NPC interaction and gets crazy complicated with the Mythic Adventures rules)

my wife and kids (ages 10 & 3.5) love Iron Gods above all others:) it is really good and the Sci-Fi elements really get them excited (also get the Technology Guide, its worth it!)

I second this for RoW, there's a clear definition of evil but it's more on the lines of the lesser of two, one being infinitely worse.

RoW is a great classical adventure with an epic twist. Printing out the little story pages (front inner, rear inner), or showing them this adds to the storybook feel of the grand adventure. I'd do this as a handout during specific moments in the AP add to the feel.


roguerouge wrote:

Kingmaker, as a sandbox adventure, allows you to personalize the AP as much or as little as you like. The exploration factor may appeal to your kids and running their "home" may make your life as a parent a bit easier as they see what it's like.

Kingmaker? Do you want small kids to use spreadsheets for running their kingdom or take a HUGE amount of time to do other wise? and learn the mass combat rules?

@GM-JZ
If the kids want a story, they won't find it in Shattered Star (except if the DM put it there), also it might be too mature for kids (books 2 and 5 mostly but also part of 3).


leo1925 wrote:

Kingmaker? Do you want small kids to use spreadsheets for running their kingdom or take a HUGE amount of time to do other wise? and learn the mass combat rules?

Not particularly, but there's no reason not to either let the mother handle the maths and the children make the decisions or to simply put that behind the screen and give the kids choices.

On the other hand, I've DM'd for 4th graders before and, if they get into something, they WILL develop system mastery at the expense of all other activities. If they're into it, great, if not it's easy to fix.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
roguerouge wrote:
leo1925 wrote:

Kingmaker? Do you want small kids to use spreadsheets for running their kingdom or take a HUGE amount of time to do other wise? and learn the mass combat rules?

Not particularly, but there's no reason not to either let the mother handle the maths and the children make the decisions or to simply put that behind the screen and give the kids choices.

On the other hand, I've DM'd for 4th graders before and, if they get into something, they WILL develop system mastery at the expense of all other activities. If they're into it, great, if not it's easy to fix.

I started a Kingmaker campaign for fourth graders, they're now doing it all themselves:)

And yes Kingmaker is great for that age group, especially since it helps teach about world/government building, economics, civic responsibility and all that jazz:) its usually my default kids recommendation but i've noticed kids also love a story.
my daughter (the older of the 2) loves a story and wasn't as interested in the paperwork aspect of kingmaker:)


Found this thread, good stuff. Now, I am unlikely to actually run any path (I have Shackled City & Rise of the Runelords already) but I want to read more. Which ones read the best?

If you have read many please list them in order of how you liked them please. You can include the old Dungeon magazine ones. (Age of worms etc)(FYI, I enjoyed reading Shackled City far more than Rise) Thanks for any replies.

Further comments on playability are cool too, I may someday rejoin the living & run one.


I'm an expert at Carrion Crown; you can ask me whatever questions you wish about it. I can't compare it to the other AP's because I haven't run any others, though I am an experienced DM (20 years worth).

I must say that I really liked CC, as there's lots of investigation and dungeon crawling. Also I like the horror genre.


For kids under age 15 we try and run and modify some of the modules and pathfinder scenarios.

I couldn't even think of running Rise of the Runelords for kids, especially if you have read the Skinsaw and Hook mountain sections.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

With kids and Adventure Paths, it's as much as what you don't say as what you do, kids just want to have fun, they don't care so much for the details :-)


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captain yesterday wrote:
With kids and Adventure Paths, it's as much as what you don't say as what you do, kids just want to have fun, they don't care so much for the details :-)

exactly, good point, I understand.

RotR just seems pretty heavy. We have ran our kids through Dragons demand (Modified of course), portions of Mummy's Mask, and several Pathfinder Society scenarios, and they had a lot of fun.

Dark Archive

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With the original question being back in January and the topic generally having moved on, I'm going to answer about what I think the best APs are in more-general terms as opposed to tailoring things to the best APs with the constraints there.

I think the following four are the best:

1. Curse of the Crimson Throne

Spoilers for the AP:

Pros:
+ It has what I consider the best overall Pathfinder adventure (Seven Days to the Grave).
+ It has the best dungeon-crawl module (Skeletons of Scarwall).
+ It has a strong introduction and a strong ending.
+ It has an interesting city as its primary focus.
+ It has the best NPCs (Laori being a particular star, but lots of them being awesome).
+ It has the very strong villain integration.
+ It pulls the 'retrieve a legendary weapon' plotline very well with Scarwall.
+ Havero!
Cons:
- Some of the portions surrounding the Arkona place and its dungeon were weaker than the rest of the Path.
- Requires updating from 3.5, which fortunately isn't that hard

2. Iron Gods

Spoilers for the AP:

Pros:
+ It has the strongest final module (The Divinity Drive).
+ It handles integrating technology with Pathfinder really well.
+ It has a strong duo of major villains in Hellion and Unity.
+ It has numerous solid areas.
+ It has the best representation of a wizard's tower that I've seen in a module (in The Smoking Tower); it includes tech, but it still feels like the best wizard's tower I've seen published for a game and has a properly different feel towards its tech than the more pure-technology segments.
+ The part where the players get to work towards choosing the details of a deity and assisting with her ascension is fairly awesome.
+ It (particularly in the first part) feels like an homage to Barrier Peaks in the right ways while avoiding just copying things from it.
+ It has the best attack-a-city-and-defeat-the-ruling-powers scenario I've seen in the attack on Starfall in City of Fallen Stars.
+ It has a strong introduction.
Cons:
- It has an issue at the end of Module 2 where heading to Module 5 seems like the most apt thing for a lot of parties to do and requires some GM tweaking to direct people more toward the Module 3/4 saga instead.

3. Kingmaker

Spoilers for the AP:

Pros:
+ The best sandbox AP, good exploration components and open format.
+ Introduces the kingdom system and lets players run a kingdom.
+ Extremely atmospheric final module (recently dethroned as the best by The Divinity Drive).
+ Probably the most successful implementation of alternate rule-systems as key to an Adventure Path.
Cons:
- The last module, while awesome, feels mildly disconnected from the rest (though it's easy to play up the hints toward it).
- There's some minor wonkiness in army combat and the nitty-gritty bits of Kingdom Building; I've found that my players and I enjoy both a lot regardless.

4. Reign of Winter

Spoilers for the AP:

Pros:
+ It takes a concept that I was initially very leery about (involving Earth in the setting) and handles it *excellently* in Rasputin Must Die.
+ It does a very good job on Triaxis too, handling the alien world and the introduction to some of its factions well. The Frozen Stars is very strong overall.
+ It handles atmosphere well in Irrisen.
+ The Hut is well-integrated throughout the path.
+ Planet hopping!
+ Baba Yaga!
Cons:
- While the beginning is good, the strongest parts of the path are Parts 4 and 5, meaning that the players don't get the full wow-factor early on
- While still a good module, Part 3 doesn't do as much with Iobaria as it could, instead remaining confined to a giant triple-dungeon-complex.
- I'm glad that The Frozen Stars had alt-options besides working for the Dragonfire Mandate, but the Drakelands side of things was overall weaker and suffered, I think, from not having enough space.

Curse of the Crimson Throne and Iron Gods are the two overall most-solidly-executed ones with tons of excellent adventures and content in both. Kingmaker is also quite good, but makes it into the 'best' bracket mainly on the merit of the systems and alternate-AP-playstyle that it introduced. I admit to being a bit biased in favor of Reign of Winter due to personally really liking its themes/setting/main concepts; I still think it is a really solid AP, though.

For the OP, I'd probably go with Iron Gods if the question is still open there (assuming they like sci-fi and don't mind the fantasy/sci-fi blend).


I also suggest curse of the crimson throne, jade regent and iron gods.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Lord Gadigan they need you to do that with every Adventure Path in a new thread then sticky the s#$+ out of that, well done I can't favorite it enough.


Skull and Shackles for a kids adventure. I mean, what kid doesn't love pirates? No to mention sailing their own ship to new islands. Has almost the "Disney" feel - your captured and put to work as squabs by a brutal and unforgiving Master-of-Arms.

Just tweak down the heavy interactions in the beginning and have the crew members take a liking to your adventures with more ease. The rest is a cake walk.

Not much for riddles in the first adventure path, but it picks up in book 2.

Hope this helps anyone reading this thread.

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