Agent Carter


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The Exchange

So, Dottie is a trained assassin, ha?

Say, other than Hawkeye and Word (From Agent of Shield), does the MCU have any serious male combatants? I mean, there's Coulson and Fury, I suppose, but these two are known more for their wit and leadership than their combat expertise. It seems like almost all non superhero fighters are female. It makes a kind of sense, I suppose - all super heroes are male, so the only way to introduce a similar number of awesome female combatants is to have everyone else be female. Still, it's an odd statistical spike.


Have there been other non-super powered male characters? It's not like MCU has spent a whole lot of time focused on mundane characters, outside of Carter and A.O.S.

Scarab Sages

Lord Snow wrote:

So, Dottie is a trained assassin, ha?

The Black Widow connection

Personally, I like the idea. It makes sense, provides a good sense of continuity, and opens up some potential future plotlines.


Lord Snow wrote:
Of course, these justifications are things that we the fans come up with. I doubt very much that the writers of the series have seriously considered it. Most likely they just wanted to give a feminist tint to the show and make the heroine more relate able. I find that these are the kind of things that people are willing to ignore or rationalize if they like the show, and present as arguments why the show is bad if they don't like it.

Actually, the writers have directly addressed it, and it's been brought up by Carter more than once. She's said flatly that she doesn't like how she is treated because she's only seen as Captain America's girlfriend by the SSR, and that she hates how no one outside the SSR even knows who she is. (which also lends to her continued irritation with the Captain America radio show)

On a different note, I marathoned through the first four episodes with some friends last night, and my fashion-enabled friends all kept bringing up the costuming, and how spot-on the wardrobe department was. One of them even expressed uncontrolled glee to note that Carter's seams remained straight from shot to shot.


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Lord Snow wrote:
This is a very good point. In the first CA movie, Carter was presented as some sort of badass that the people involved in the project of creating CA were already trusting (it always irritated me, by the way, that it was made very clear that she is a good trusted woman of action, yet somehow nobody ever considered choosing her to be the first to be tested with the new super-soldier thingy - just one of the things that make that movie bad). So she was involved in matters, treated as an equal and relied upon.

There were no women on the front lines of WWII. The idea would have been unthinkable. Carter was a competent agent, but her operations were strictly behind the scenes. They were looking for a super-soldier, not a super-spy. Hence looking for a suitable prospect among the enlisted men.

The Exchange

Shadowborn wrote:
Lord Snow wrote:
This is a very good point. In the first CA movie, Carter was presented as some sort of badass that the people involved in the project of creating CA were already trusting (it always irritated me, by the way, that it was made very clear that she is a good trusted woman of action, yet somehow nobody ever considered choosing her to be the first to be tested with the new super-soldier thingy - just one of the things that make that movie bad). So she was involved in matters, treated as an equal and relied upon.
There were no women on the front lines of WWII. The idea would have been unthinkable. Carter was a competent agent, but her operations were strictly behind the scenes. They were looking for a super-soldier, not a super-spy. Hence looking for a suitable prospect among the enlisted men.

But once you inject someone with the science thingy, they become physically unstoppable. I doubt very much the Steve Rogers was more physically fit than Peggy Carter before they made him into a superhero. The only reason women weren't soldiers is the physical edge that males have (even that isn't as clear cut as you make it sounds - Russian women were certainly in the front lines, for example). This is just a sort of dormant sexism in the script, is what I suspect.


Lord Snow wrote:
Shadowborn wrote:
Lord Snow wrote:
This is a very good point. In the first CA movie, Carter was presented as some sort of badass that the people involved in the project of creating CA were already trusting (it always irritated me, by the way, that it was made very clear that she is a good trusted woman of action, yet somehow nobody ever considered choosing her to be the first to be tested with the new super-soldier thingy - just one of the things that make that movie bad). So she was involved in matters, treated as an equal and relied upon.
There were no women on the front lines of WWII. The idea would have been unthinkable. Carter was a competent agent, but her operations were strictly behind the scenes. They were looking for a super-soldier, not a super-spy. Hence looking for a suitable prospect among the enlisted men.
But once you inject someone with the science thingy, they become physically unstoppable. I doubt very much the Steve Rogers was more physically fit than Peggy Carter before they made him into a superhero. The only reason women weren't soldiers is the physical edge that males have (even that isn't as clear cut as you make it sounds - Russian women were certainly in the front lines, for example). This is just a sort of dormant sexism in the script, is what I suspect.

Dormant sexism in the script or a reflection of not at all dormant sexism in the 40s?

Scarab Sages

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Lord Snow wrote:
Shadowborn wrote:
Lord Snow wrote:
This is a very good point. In the first CA movie, Carter was presented as some sort of badass that the people involved in the project of creating CA were already trusting (it always irritated me, by the way, that it was made very clear that she is a good trusted woman of action, yet somehow nobody ever considered choosing her to be the first to be tested with the new super-soldier thingy - just one of the things that make that movie bad). So she was involved in matters, treated as an equal and relied upon.
There were no women on the front lines of WWII. The idea would have been unthinkable. Carter was a competent agent, but her operations were strictly behind the scenes. They were looking for a super-soldier, not a super-spy. Hence looking for a suitable prospect among the enlisted men.
But once you inject someone with the science thingy, they become physically unstoppable. I doubt very much the Steve Rogers was more physically fit than Peggy Carter before they made him into a superhero. The only reason women weren't soldiers is the physical edge that males have (even that isn't as clear cut as you make it sounds - Russian women were certainly in the front lines, for example). This is just a sort of dormant sexism in the script, is what I suspect.

OR, Steve Rogers was the original Captain America from the comics, and since they wanted to stick at least somewhat close to the comics, they decided to keep him as Captain America rather then give in to PC b@#*~@&~.


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Lord Snow wrote:
Shadowborn wrote:
Lord Snow wrote:
This is a very good point. In the first CA movie, Carter was presented as some sort of badass that the people involved in the project of creating CA were already trusting (it always irritated me, by the way, that it was made very clear that she is a good trusted woman of action, yet somehow nobody ever considered choosing her to be the first to be tested with the new super-soldier thingy - just one of the things that make that movie bad). So she was involved in matters, treated as an equal and relied upon.
There were no women on the front lines of WWII. The idea would have been unthinkable. Carter was a competent agent, but her operations were strictly behind the scenes. They were looking for a super-soldier, not a super-spy. Hence looking for a suitable prospect among the enlisted men.
But once you inject someone with the science thingy, they become physically unstoppable. I doubt very much the Steve Rogers was more physically fit than Peggy Carter before they made him into a superhero. The only reason women weren't soldiers is the physical edge that males have (even that isn't as clear cut as you make it sounds - Russian women were certainly in the front lines, for example). This is just a sort of dormant sexism in the script, is what I suspect.

the other part to take into consideration...Rogers was very much a guinea pig. They might not want to waste valuable intelligence operatives to test a serum linked to deformity and madness (see: Red Skull).

The Exchange

Quote:
Dormant sexism in the script or a reflection of not at all dormant sexism in the 40s?

But you can't have it both ways. Either they trust her and appreciate her, or they don't. So either she is not there in the first place, or they should at the very least consider her as an option - which they didn't. By "dormant sexism" I meant that because she is a woman, the script writer did not even deem it worthy to give a good reason why she shouldn't be chosen to be enhanced. They either didn't think about it or considered it self explanatory, both of which I find to be an expression of finding women to be lesser than men.

Quote:
OR, Steve Rogers was the original Captain America from the comics, and since they wanted to stick at least somewhat close to the comics, they decided to keep him as Captain America rather then give in to PC b#$+~&@*.

I never suggested that they should have replaced the Captain America of the comics with Peggy Carter, merely that in the way her character was introduced and portrayed in the movie, there was no apparent logical reason to start a big, expensive and time consuming process to find a good candidate when a perfectly valid one (who doubtlessly would have volunteered had she been given the chance) was right there from the beginning.

Quote:
the other part to take into consideration...Rogers was very much a guinea pig. They might not want to waste valuable intelligence operatives to test a serum linked to deformity and madness (see: Red Skull).

This, for example, is a very good reason not to do the experiment on her. A satisfactory answer, as far as I am concerned. Still, it would have been better if it was included in the movie itself.


I'm pretty sure that doesn't need to be spelled out. Carter was in charge of finding the right volunteer. If she'd though she was the right one, then she would have volunteered herself. Plus, you know, Steve freakin' Rogers is Captain America.

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32

Lord Snow wrote:
Quote:
Dormant sexism in the script or a reflection of not at all dormant sexism in the 40s?
But you can't have it both ways. Either they trust her and appreciate her, or they don't. So either she is not there in the first place, or they should at the very least consider her as an option - which they didn't. By "dormant sexism" I meant that because she is a woman, the script writer did not even deem it worthy to give a good reason why she shouldn't be chosen to be enhanced.

Actually, yes you can have it both ways.

Yes, they trust and appreciate Peggy Carter's abilities. But she is a woman.

In America (or Britain for that matter) fighting on the front lines was a job for a man.

That was the extent of their thinking.

Lord Snow wrote:
They either didn't think about it or considered it self explanatory, both of which I find to be an expression of finding women to be lesser than men.

Very true. You're not grasping how different the world was then, in the 1940s men (and women!) actually believed that men were superior.

This is why she is encountering so much resistance in the S.S.R. After the war was over, the men (who still ran the world) fully expected women to return to the previous roles.

Shadowborn wrote:
I'm pretty sure that doesn't need to be spelled out. Carter was in charge of finding the right volunteer. If she'd though she was the right one, then she would have volunteered herself. Plus, you know, Steve freakin' Rogers is Captain America.

Incorrect. Colonel Chester Phillips was in charge of recruiting volunteers.

Steve Rogers, however, was recruited directly by Dr. Abraham Erskine.


Also, It was an AMERICAN project and she was decidedly NOT American. There is no way they were going to give this super-secret awesome serum of awesomeness to a British agent, male OR Female...

And besides... I REALLY hate people trying to point out the excuse of 'why' Peggy wasn't chosen...

Out of MILLIONS of potential people across the country and in the service... ONLY one was chosen. May as well ask why Col. Philips wasn't chosen... or Bucky? Same reason as Peggy. Doesn't matter if she came in 2nd place on the list or 4,025th...

Besides... She was pretty mean in that first movie. She had no problem putting down anyone who crossed her verbally or physically if need be. Sexism aside, that was what Erskine was NOT looking for ;)


while on the topic of Super Soldier candidates I have to wonder, will the MCU touch on the "Red, White and Black" story. Stark already brough up that the army was just about out of it's samples of Steve's blood.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Marik Whiterose wrote:
I think that it's the fact that she was on the front lines in WW II and is now relegated to the role of a glorified secretary back home that gets to her more than the rampant sexism of that day and age.

They're not separate issues. The rampant sexism is at the root of the contempt Carter gets from her so-called colleagues. It's symbolic of the women who were forced out of work when the war ended and the armed forces started ramping down.


Greylurker wrote:
while on the topic of Super Soldier candidates I have to wonder, will the MCU touch on the "Red, White and Black" story. Stark already brough up that the army was just about out of it's samples of Steve's blood.

Agent Carter keeps bringing up "Project Rebirth", so at this point I expect we will see more experiments to "recreate" Captain America, assuming the show gets more seasons.


And for that matter...whos to say Agent Carter wants to get the super soldier formula. Again...last test subject that we know of had his face fall off. I would not be jumping at the chance to try that formula AT ALL.

Liberty's Edge

Steve Rogers was a guinea pig. Erskine and co thought they had it worked out... but bad things happen. Remember the scene with him screaming and Erskine and Stark panicking and about to stop?

Agent Carter was too valuable to be a test subject.

Liberty's Edge

Greylurker wrote:
while on the topic of Super Soldier candidates I have to wonder, will the MCU touch on the "Red, White and Black" story. Stark already brough up that the army was just about out of it's samples of Steve's blood.

They may not bring Isaiah Bradley in (I would expect him to appear as a easter egg more than anything else), but Luke Cage will almost certainly be linked to Rebirth just like Banner was and I expect the Maximoffs to be following the general trend of lifting origins from the Ultimates line.


Krensky wrote:
Greylurker wrote:
while on the topic of Super Soldier candidates I have to wonder, will the MCU touch on the "Red, White and Black" story. Stark already brough up that the army was just about out of it's samples of Steve's blood.
They may not bring Isaiah Bradley in (I would expect him to appear as a easter egg more than anything else), but Luke Cage will almost certainly be linked to Rebirth just like Banner was and I expect the Maximoffs to be following the general trend of lifting origins from the Ultimates line.

An interesting point if the government is already out of blood...

Though didn't Banner still have some of the 'formula' itself to work with? Just no rays...


Krensky wrote:
Greylurker wrote:
while on the topic of Super Soldier candidates I have to wonder, will the MCU touch on the "Red, White and Black" story. Stark already brough up that the army was just about out of it's samples of Steve's blood.
They may not bring Isaiah Bradley in (I would expect him to appear as a easter egg more than anything else), but Luke Cage will almost certainly be linked to Rebirth just like Banner was and I expect the Maximoffs to be following the general trend of lifting origins from the Ultimates line.

The Maximoffs seem to be a result of Hydra experiments with the infinity stone in Loki's sceptor, at least based on the end credit scene in Winter Soldier.

Liberty's Edge

phantom1592 wrote:
Krensky wrote:
Greylurker wrote:
while on the topic of Super Soldier candidates I have to wonder, will the MCU touch on the "Red, White and Black" story. Stark already brough up that the army was just about out of it's samples of Steve's blood.
They may not bring Isaiah Bradley in (I would expect him to appear as a easter egg more than anything else), but Luke Cage will almost certainly be linked to Rebirth just like Banner was and I expect the Maximoffs to be following the general trend of lifting origins from the Ultimates line.

An interesting point if the government is already out of blood...

Though didn't Banner still have some of the 'formula' itself to work with? Just no rays...

Banner was using the Rebirth formula and gamma rays instead of vita rays. Blonski got two doses of the Rebirth formula, no radiation, then a transfusion of Banner's blood. The future Mastermind then got some of Banner's blood in him as well.

Based on how it works the producers and writers are almost certainly going with the Rebirth formula being some sort of viral agent like the comics rather then a chemical treatment.

Technically Cage is from another series of experiments and not the Rebirth/Weapon X program in 616, but I'm confident he'll be tied to Erskine's work in AKA Jessica Jones/Luke Cage/Iron Fist/The Defenders.

I'm guessing Matt Murdock and Jessica Jones may well tie back into Rebirth or maybe the Kree healing drug somehow, since the radioactive chemical origin thing will seem silly. Although Murdock may just get away with being a just that good.

Daniel Rand will either be a purely mundane like Hawkeye and Black Widow, or that plus some magic like the comics.

Doc Strange is obvious magic.

The Black Panther has a mystical component in the comics, but I suspect he'll be positioned more like as a black Batman with minimal spirituality. Hopefully that won't backfire.

Captain Marvel should be part Kree, so assuming she avoids getting pegged as a female Superman...

Due to Sony holding all the rights to 'mutants' they haven't really explained where the few mutant like abilities we've seen come from yet. The MCU tends to borrow from the Ultimates "it all comes back to Cap" schtick, so "not mutants, but mutants" may well share that they're attempts to replicate the effects of Rebirth via direct genetic engineering.

We don't know which stone the scepter is (or which the aether is either) so it could be the scepter too.

Scarab Sages

An interesting episode last night, with some insight into the program that will eventually produce Black Widow.

And I loved seeing the Howling Commandos again, but it looks like they only got two of the originals from the first Captain America movie.

The Exchange RPG Superstar 2010 Top 16

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We got to see a lot last night -- background on Dottie, and how she works; some humanizing of the SSR team, and some good detective work for Souza -- but what we really got was Carter, in her element, playing to her strengths.

It strikes me that we meet Carter at the beginning of the show just as she agrees to compromise herself with Howard Stark, and that cripples her as an effective agent. She's either emotionally torn between her duties, or she deliberately sabotages her team and herself in defense of Stark. This episode, she has her priorities clear and her skills unfettered. If this is how she was normally going about her duties, before Stark compromised her, it's a wonder she wasn't running the agency.

So, why the coded message? None of the other messages from Leviathan to his operative were in Russian, nor coded. We assume this Russian boondoggle was a trap? Leviathan was expecting the SSR? That didn't seem to be the case.


Chris Mortika wrote:
So, why the coded message? None of the other messages from Leviathan to his operative were in Russian, nor coded. We assume this Russian boondoggle was a trap? Leviathan was expecting the SSR? That didn't seem to be the case.

It could be that the original message was also supposed in Russian and coded but it was shown decoded and in English in order to make it easier on the viewers. Kinda like how they switched from Russian subtitles to English 1/4 of the way through Hunt for Red October.

Or it was a trap...

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Pawns Subscriber

IT'S A TRAP!

...especially if you remember the young girl crying... this was an obvious attempt to lure SSR there and murder them.... I note the lack of any problem GETTING INTO the facility, but a whole lot more problems GETTING OUT.

I think this was meant as a trap, including the coded message. The russians are far from stupid! (and the story has to move along pretty swiftly, seeing that there's only 3 or 4 shows left... ;) )


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I think it was a ploy to get the Russian Psychiatrist into SRR clutches...I didn't buy his reasoning for being at the facility.


Especially since he conveniently killed is only patient;)

Scarab Sages

MMCJawa wrote:
I think it was a ploy to get the Russian Psychiatrist into SRR clutches...I didn't buy his reasoning for being at the facility.

Indeed. It's one of the thoughts that crossed into my brain as well. And why not? Hydra did the infiltration thing. Makes sense that Leviathan would do it as well.

Scarab Sages

Something else I've been thinking - I wonder if we'll see good old Dr. Zola somewhere around. Could be an interesting reunion for Peggy.

Sovereign Court

Yeah Toby Jones was awesome.


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I like the window into Stark working with the Russians, that was the background for Iron Man 2 right? Stark and his Russian counterpart going their separate ways.

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Pawns Subscriber

yes in Iron Man 2 the bad guy was pissed at Tony Stark because his father apparently helped Howard Stark with the arc reactor's design and never reaped the benefits and was left out to die in Russia... died a poor man I thought he said... wondering if the father was the "crazy genius" that just died in the last episode of Agent Carter, or maybe it will be the guy that's being deported to the U.S.?

Sovereign Court

Anton Vanko died in Iron Man 2...

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Pawns Subscriber

hmmmmm....


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Vanko was the scientist that Peggy and Jarvis went to see back in episode 1. Still working for Stark in 1946.

The Exchange

Wow, what a great episode. Best in the season so far, and no doubt about it.

I have some caveats: The cryptography in the episode was as laughable as any Marvel science. At the intro, when the little girls were fighting, I thought that the sounds effects were way over the top - I mean it's understandable when they use those loud crunching noises for adults fighting but come on, those kids can't weigh like a sack of feathers both together, no way there's so much force behind those punches. It was really distracting.

However, overall it was just truly good. Did anyone else get chills down their spine when Dotty offered Peggy half of her bread and said offhandedly that she can never finish hers? in just that one smart line of dialog they tell you a ton about the character and the messed up life she had. In general I felt the dialog was good in this episode. Story is advancing crisply and I actually feel some suspense about where it's going (that almost never happened to me with Agents of Shield, for example). Howling Commandos were nice, action scenes were solid, the investigative aspect of some of the story threads was done well.

Also, I find it really amusing that the way that dude found out that Peggy is (was, I guess) a mole for Howard Stark is by identifying an actual mole on her shoulder.


You mean the bullet wounds on her shoulder?


And yes Dottie is really creepy, I bit my lip in apprehension of what the bread offering meant. I do wonder why she needed to swipe her room keys, isn't she trained in lock picking?


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Aranna wrote:
And yes Dottie is really creepy, I bit my lip in apprehension of what the bread offering meant. I do wonder why she needed to swipe her room keys, isn't she trained in lock picking?

It's the path of least resistance.

It's easier walking into the valet parking of a fancy restaurant looking the part of a valet and simply take the keys to a car and then by extension the car itself than it would be to jimmy the car lock and then disable the alarm.

Likewise with professional boosters they're looking for the car WITHOUT the club or complicated lock. Takes more time to bypass those. The more time exposed in the open the higher chance they'll get caught.

Bringing it back to the episode, it's better to get the keys from the target and get into her room quickly with less of a chance of being seen than to be messing around with a tension bar on the lock.

The Exchange

Aranna wrote:
You mean the bullet wounds on her shoulder?

Ah, yes. Thought they were moles. To be perfectly honest I'm not very skilled at identifying wounds and scars. Lack of experience is my excuse.


It was in the report Sousa was reading. Under identifying marks it indicated she has two bullet wound scars on her shoulder.

The Exchange

I was wandering why a report would mention moles ^_^


Aranna wrote:
You mean the bullet wounds on her shoulder?

I really liked this. Not only was it a reference to Captain America, but it made that whole inclusion of that scene in the first episode more than just a flashback/movie tie-in.

I agree with Lord Snow; this was probably the best episode to date. They just keep getting better. There has been a really nice, slow build on all the characters. Dooley continues to impress me; the actor has such a subtle, understated way of emoting and expressing that- despite his gruff demeanor- he respects Peggy. And I love the little side investigation he's got going on. He seems to be coming around to Stark not being the culprit, and demonstrating that he's not the incompetent agent he seemed in the beginning. All of the male SSR agents, frankly (that are still alive).

(I do think it's a little weird that the Red Room would have its agents kill other agents, even as a demonstration of their ability/brainwashing, because of the sheer waste of expense and time, but it was a cool and chilling moment.)

Grand Lodge

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Cthulhudrew wrote:


(I do think it's a little weird that the Red Room would have its agents kill other agents, even as a demonstration of their ability/brainwashing, because of the sheer waste of expense and time, but it was a cool and chilling moment.)

It's how you establish your Sick Evil cred with the audience.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
phantom1592 wrote:


Out of MILLIONS of potential people across the country and in the service... ONLY one was chosen. May as well ask why Col. Philips wasn't chosen... or Bucky? Same reason as Peggy. Doesn't matter if she came in 2nd place on the list or 4,025th...

Not just Rogers, there was a whole campful of candidates. Rogers stood out because he was the one who threw himself on the grenade while the others ran for cover. It was not Carter who had the final say, it was the general who threw the grenade.


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LazarX wrote:
phantom1592 wrote:


Out of MILLIONS of potential people across the country and in the service... ONLY one was chosen. May as well ask why Col. Philips wasn't chosen... or Bucky? Same reason as Peggy. Doesn't matter if she came in 2nd place on the list or 4,025th...

Not just Rogers, there was a whole campful of candidates. Rogers stood out because he was the one who threw himself on the grenade while the others ran for cover. It was not Carter who had the final say, it was the general who threw the grenade.

also keep in mind that Rogers was meant to be the First of a whole line of super soldiers. He wasn't just a Guinea pig he was also promotional material to convince the top brass that the program had been worth the money. The before and after photos alone would have doubled their budget.

While the scientist in charge may have chosen Steve based on the character of the man, the other side of the decision is that Steve was expendable. Had it failed all they would have lost is a scrawny guy who wouldn't have been able to fight anyway. The plan for if it worked was an assembly line of super humans, using real soldiers instead of scrawny little nobodies.

Hydra sabotage was just a great big monkey wretch that made Steve indespensible.

Shadow Lodge

LazarX wrote:
Cthulhudrew wrote:


(I do think it's a little weird that the Red Room would have its agents kill other agents, even as a demonstration of their ability/brainwashing, because of the sheer waste of expense and time, but it was a cool and chilling moment.)

It's how you establish your Sick Evil cred with the audience.

It's also good for culling out the prospective failures.

The Exchange

Kthulhu wrote:
LazarX wrote:
Cthulhudrew wrote:


(I do think it's a little weird that the Red Room would have its agents kill other agents, even as a demonstration of their ability/brainwashing, because of the sheer waste of expense and time, but it was a cool and chilling moment.)

It's how you establish your Sick Evil cred with the audience.
It's also good for culling out the prospective failures.

Because really, how many Black Widows does one actually *need*? (bear in mind most of them aren't as pretty as Scarlet Johansson when you answer).

The Exchange RPG Superstar 2010 Top 16

One note in particular about the code-breaking scene:

"I saw this at Lechley. It's a one-time pad system."

"You think I didn't try a pad immediately?!"

The one-time pad is a technique for encoding messages, yes. It says that, instead of using a repeating key, the two communicants use up a one-time encryption.

As our friends at Wikipedia wrote:
In cryptography, a one-time pad (OTP) is an encryption technique that cannot be cracked if used correctly. In this technique, a plaintext is paired with a random secret key (or pad). Then, each bit or character of the plaintext is encrypted by combining it with the corresponding bit or character from the pad using modular addition. If the key is truly random, is at least as long as the plaintext, is never reused in whole or in part, and is kept completely secret, then the resulting ciphertext will be impossible to decrypt or break.[1][2][3] It has also been proven that any cipher with the perfect secrecy property must use keys with effectively the same requirements as OTP keys.[4] However, practical problems have prevented one-time pads from being widely used.

So, first, it's not a one-time pad, because the Leviathan agent wasn't decrypting his messages letter-by-letter. Second, if it were a pad, neither the cryptographer nor Peggy nor anyone else could decrypt it. The plaintext would be, literally, as likely as any other equal-lengthed message.

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