Things I learned from Games that apply to real life


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icehawk333 wrote:

Really? It's hard to snap when you've always been broken.

^_^

No, no ... the small, tiny remains of you can still be snapped. :/

/words of encouragement.


Well, then I've been snapped to dust by now.

^_^


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how to build a Catapult! only 800 more popsicle sticks and that baby is finished and ready for a siege! but boy, do i hate popsicles!


I think you need steel for that.

May taste better, too.


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icehawk333 wrote:

I think you need steel for that.

May taste better, too.

i've been secretly using the silverware:-)

just don't tell my wife, she thinks the neighbors are stealing it;-)

that would also explain why the only "herd" animals it'll launch are the neighbors cats, doesn't explain the restraining orders from the neighbors tho..... maybe watching Game of Thrones will give me ideas on how to deal with the neighbors.....


No, no. Don't bother.

You deal with noisy neighbors by calling the local low-level murderhobo.


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icehawk333 wrote:

No, no. Don't bother.

You deal with noisy neighbors by calling the local low-level murderhobo.

I'm offended! I'll Kill you! I'll Kill you all!


but seriously, DnD taught me math, and spelling:-)


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Math for sure. I was way ahead of all my classmates in school when it came with dealing with negative numbers thanks to THAC0.


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the first I learned to spell that wasnt my name or address was "Catapult" my first dwarf saved and he saved until he could afford a catapult and the two Oxen to pull it, he took it everywhere, alas their are only so many places for a dwarf & his catapult:(


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Ted, Professional MurderHobo wrote:
icehawk333 wrote:

No, no. Don't bother.

You deal with noisy neighbors by calling the local low-level murderhobo.

I'm offended! I'll Kill you! I'll Kill you all!

Remember Teddy, if you are going to kill, always get paid upfront. It says so in your contract.

Yours,
~Jaspar "Shank Him Louis" Kahrdboordebachs~
your local GUMBO representative


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Murderhobo Union Representative wrote:
Ted, Professional MurderHobo wrote:
icehawk333 wrote:

No, no. Don't bother.

You deal with noisy neighbors by calling the local low-level murderhobo.

I'm offended! I'll Kill you! I'll Kill you all!

Remember Teddy, if you are going to kill, always get paid upfront. It says so in your contract.

Yours,
~Jaspar "Shank Him Louis" Kahrdboordebachs~
your local GUMBO representative

Oh, i will and then i'll take their Fields and Salt their Women! Mwahahahaha--- wait! is that right? It doesn't matter! either way i'll bathe in their-----

the time clock whistle from the looney tunes cartoon with the wolf and sheep hound blares
wow! 5 o'clock already? man does time fly, alright, blood bath tomorrow then?
boy!, i hope i can still catch Wheel of Fortune......


ElterAgo wrote:

Well, I’m not real good at the esoteric things. But I do have examples of learning concrete real world skills.

Some years back, both of my boys were having trouble in school. Though they are both reasonably intelligent, they were at the bottom of their respective classes in reading, spelling, and mathematics. One has an actual learning disability that makes reading very difficult and slow. The other just really didn’t try. I think because he was reading as well as his older brother who obviously wasn’t getting in trouble for it.
I got them interested in Magic The Gathering card game (including a computer version that let them play against the AI all they wanted). Well, to play that game you have to read and understand the card then add and subtract all those numbers. Then decide what will well work together in a deck.
In one game there is more reading and basic math than in any 2 school lessons that we would have to fight all night to get them to complete. Yes, eventually they would get the cards memorized. But that is also a good skill. Didn’t bother me at all. Every so often I’d get them a new booster back that they would have to understand then figure out how to incorporate in their decks.
After a couple months when they had that well in hand. I introduced them to DnD 3.0 books I still had lying around (I wasn’t in a gaming group at that time). They loved it. There’s tons more crap to read, understand, consider, add, subtract, multiply, divide, etc… than in any card game.
“Dad, my ranger’s got a bunch of gold but not enough for a better bow. What can he buy to be better at shooting and stuff? Well, maybe look at a wand of a ranger spell that will help like Cat’s Grace. They can really use that? What’s that do? How much does it cost? I don’t remember exactly off the top of my head, go look it up in the players handbook.”
(Of course I did remember, but I wanted him to check it.) Sure I had to help him with a bunch of words and some math, but for the next couple of hours he worked over the ranger spell...

What a great story! Would you mind if I shared it on my website for a middle-school afterschool Pathfinder program, read by kids and parents?


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As a person's access to resources becomes more plentiful, the person becomes less careful about consuming those resources.

Specifically, I noticed this in MMORPGs, in regards to money. To a player starting out, every bit of coin was precious. They'd carefully consider any purchase, and in games with an auction mechanic, they'd scan carefully for bargains. Once the player had significant currency, they would routinely overspend on auctions and convenience buy. The exact same item that they had earlier recognized as ridiculously overpriced, they would buy blithely and without thought.

After observing the behaviour across multiple games, I started to wonder if it was applicable outside of games. A quick look at pricing of identical items, based on target demographics suggests it is. Before Federated (Macy's) bought the May Company out, you could sometimes find the same items in both Kaufmans and Lord & Taylor circulars. Same items, same company, the difference was at L & T they were $200 more on average.

Of course there are exceptions. Both in game and life, some without resources spend wildly, and some with wealth are frugal. They seem to be the exception in my experience.


The Rot Grub wrote:
What a great story! Would you mind if I shared it on my website for a middle-school afterschool Pathfinder program, read by kids and parents?

Not a problem. Go right ahead.

Silver Crusade

I'm a bit lazy, take the past of least resistance. Not admirable, but gaming has let me realise a couple of things...

• it takes some intelligent thought, and the motive to bother, to set things up so that you can still do well while doing as little as possible. Paving the way for a lazy future is the motive to expend effort now

• if things are easy, I coast. If things get deadly, I manage to find creative solutions. The more pressure/danger, the better I perform. This was a nice realisation

I learn lessons from gaming and use them in RL, and I also learn RL lessons and apply them while gaming. This reflexive relationship bounces ideas backward and forward, and gaming gives a relatively safe way of trying things out.

I learned a lot about leadership by combining lessons from leading fellow party members in such a way that they don't resent it, and leading a team as a Pit Boss in my real life job in a casino. You can learn much from watching the mistakes of others, then trying to understand why that didn't work. For example, I've seen (in both RL and at the gaming table) a person suddenly given a leadership role for the first time, and simply order people about without any respect, and throw their metaphorical toys out of the pram when it all went pear-shaped. There's more to leadership than telling people what to do.


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Don't split the party!

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32

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It takes a horde to raze a village.


Good ideas should not be constrained by rules.

Scarab Sages

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Muad'Dib wrote:
Good ideas should not be constrained by rules.

QFT - the rules exist to serve the ideas, and if they start dominating rather than serving, then they have forgotten their place and forfeit their legitimacy.

ALSO: Rules are just tools, and can be very useful ones - it's the people who can't see beyond them that are the real problem.

AND: "How things work," "rules," "laws," and "Law" are all completely different things, and must all be viewed, regarded, and handled in completely different manners - that they're bound together in so many peoples' minds is really just an accident of culture and language (Anaximander started it, Einstein killed it).


Beauty is in the eye of the Beholder, Do Not however look one in the eye

Scarab Sages

Most people have no need for "leaders," least of all "strong" ones - those who agitate for one (be it themself or someone else) are not to be trusted.

Never mistake narrow-mindedness for decisiveness - if you can figure things out because you're smart, that's good; if it is, by contrast, because you're blind to the majority of the possibilities on the table (or worse still, choose to blind yourself to them), that's very bad.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:

I have never once in all my 29 years of gaming seen anyone get into a screaming match table pounding, wall hitting, or table flipping. I've seen disagreements and people get a bit heated over something, but stories about the former just boggle my mind.

I saw one board flip, maybe 40 years ago.

Mostly, it helps to play with adults- no matter how old they are.


Being in charge is annoying and tedious and makes you want scream. Being part of a group of equals is fun.


That I am a horrible person who'd rather set the world on fire then work to make it better.

That I have no idea how to plan and don't want to and should never be given a level of responsibility above "smash".

That if you get frustrated trying to get something you want it's not worth getting at all.

Plotlines are overrated: true fun comes in the individual moments that will almost never have anything to do with each other.


It lives!!!

Liberty's Edge

Things I've Learned From RPGs In General:

Some vocabulary, plus the ability to do simple math quickly in my head.

Very god reading comprehension. I partially credit RPGs with my 800 on reading comprehension on the SATs.

A basic grasp of tactics and the effectiveness of surprise attacks.

How to organize, motivate, and lead people (I GM a fair bit). I've actually gotten pretty good at this one.

A fair amount of persuasion and social skill (it's hard to tell how much of this is really from gaming, and how much from other stuff...but gaming certainly hasn't hurt).

Acting skills. The only thing I learned in my college drama class was how to project properly, since I pretty much had the rest down.

How to tell a story, and what elements make for a good one.

That I'm much better at structured social interaction than the unstructured kind.

That I'm really reliable when people are depending on me. At least in person.

Things I Learned From World oOf Darkness LARPs Specifically:

Almost nobody ever actually pays attention to what's going on in any but the most cursory fashion. If you do, you rapidly get a reputation for knowing everything. (Note: I was playing a Nosferatu).

Good help is really hard to find. No, really, reliable employees/subordinates? Rare as hen's teeth.

How to manipulate and deceive people. Not that I do so in real life, but knowing how is actually pretty handy for spotting other people doing such things.

That many people who prefer theatrical LARPs (ie: ones without padded weapons) enjoy manipulating and deceiving people. In some cases the game is a release valve and they're great folks outside it. More commonly, they're just terrible people who are every bit as manipulative and self-serving outside the game as in it. This one is why I don't LARP any more...

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