Gaming sessions that made you angry


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These threads about bad players, GMs, and games are always fun to read.

I would have to say my angriest session was during character creation. I was trying to write up a sorcerer, but the GM ruled I had to explain my full lineage. This was difficult, because I didn't understand what my options were. The GM and I proceeded to argue past each other for a while, me not understanding the setting and him not understanding that I didn't understand the setting. Neither of us actually knew what the other was saying. It got so heated his fiance had to split us up.


I have multiple. But let's start with the most recent example. Three player game, I'm playing a mellow wookie. The party is only three people including myself. The other two spent the bulk of the downtime discussing killing my character, to the point I just quit.

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Have I mentioned we're using crit fumble rules? No? Well we are. Oh, looks like you've blinded yourself for 3 rounds.

We're done here.


The Indescribable wrote:
I'm playing a mellow wookie.

Now I want to whip out the Saga Edition books and write up a hippie pothead Wookie jedi.


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Mourn the lost mage, Rtilliu
(Hurloff his first name)

Who wanted to be half-ogre
(Just 'big' was not the same)

The GM said, "Your eyes don't glow"
"Your teeth are normal, too"

But Hurloff had his self-image
'The demon-mage Rtilliu'

I recount so you'll be assured
None of these weighed a wit

And all was fair and above board
When Hurloff, while stirge-bit

Did cast his lonely magic spell
And Mage Armor did form

Around Hurloff, and the stirge too!
(Which kept both snuggly warm)

Mourn the lost mage, Rtilliu
(Hurloff his first name)

Who wanted to be half-ogre
(just 'big' was not the same)


Kelsey Arwen MacAilbert wrote:
The Indescribable wrote:
I'm playing a mellow wookie.
Now I want to whip out the Saga Edition books and write up a hippie pothead Wookie jedi.

Minus the pothead jedi part, yeah, you kind of got my character. He was willing to fight, but he preferred talking. Which as a wookie was, well, difficult.


I was playing warhammer fantasy RP last winter. This is a "roll low" system, so you are trying to roll under a given percentage (for example, my current highest skill is perception at 58%, so if I roll under 58% I perceive). We had arrived at a friendly inn, had a nice dinner, discussed with a traveling doctor selling tonics. Of course, he ended up being a Chaos cultist, who set up brew from the top floor that ejected a fog that turned humans into beastmen (after failing 3 rolls). The WHOLE FNING SESSION I DID NOT ROLL UNDER 60! It was a really frustrating session where I ended up loosing 2 fate points (and regaining one).

Although I do tend to get very attached to my characters, which can lead to some anger when I'm very unlucky.

I also got pissed at the (same) WFRP DM last week. He likes running the game late, but I have to get up early to work. I've been asking for months to start a bit earlier so that we could end earlier, and when he finally did start earlier, guess what? He decided to end even later than usual! I was already tired when the game started, and I could barely think and had a nasty migraine by the end. Luckily it did not lead to anything too nasty to my character, but I did make a number of very poor tactical decisions in retrospect. I am growing to hate late-night gaming.

Shadow Lodge

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I had a DM that let the party gang rape my character's cohort. The idiot couldn't quite understand why I quit after that. Kept pushing to know why I quit coming to the game (I had made a polite excuse as to why I wouldn't be back). He was terribly upset when I explained what a douchbag move it was for the DM to ignore evil actions in a game where he had specifically outlawed evil characters. Most of his players thought it was hillarious. Honestly, 3 twenty-something guys couldn't figure out why rape isn't fin or funny.

Pretty much ruined gaming for a year as I wasn't even interested in role-playing because of that.


A couple of years ago I decided to get back into gaming after quitting with the introduction of third edition. I bought a few of the pathfinder books and fell in love with the setting and wanted to start running my own games using it. I read the rules but I had no real experince with the third edition system whatsoever and for me the best way to learn is by doing so I started looking for some local games going on at the gameshops to get a little experience before setting out on my own. I found one that was getting ready to start and got in touch with the GM. He sent me his houserules and other than being more restrictive with classes and races than I normally am I saw no real issues and told him I was willing to play as long as he had no problems with a rookie. He welcomed me aboard and said the group needed a cleric I had no problem with that and got started rolling my character. The next day I got an email from him with a cleric that was rolled up and ready to go complete with backstory. I assumed that since I told him I was new he thought I meant no experience gaming at all so I just went with it. Game day gets here and I meet up with him and the other players at the gameshop and we start playing. Every decision, every action of every player was decided by the GM. In a dungeon he told us where we were going. Every round of combat he told us what our characters were doing. We were just there to roll the dice. We somehow lasted for two months but on the plus side I did manage to pick up enough rules knowledge to be confident enough to start running my own games for my friends.


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I had a 1e character once say OUT OF CHARACTER a word that would cause instant death. The DM said it didn't matter, that it "transcended realities" and no matter who said the word would die, even if someone in another dimension said it, such as my "alter ego in this universe". I believe that was the last game I ever played with him as DM.

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My first or second trip to Origins. I signed up for a 3.5 D&D game with pregens delving into the old S3-Expedition to Barrier Peaks module. I loved the module, had a ratty old copy with a torn cover, and wanted to see how someone updated it for 3.5. Got to the game, and for a half hour, the DM ran through the software he was using to project the game map on a big screen behind him, and how we each could take turns moving the mouse to move our tokens on the screen, and how we'd roll the dice on the program, and how we'd reference our sheets, which didn't exist in hardcopy, only on the screen. Finally we started to play, but when he dropped us off at the door of the ship entrance, I realized we weren't playing D&D, we were sitting in a demo of the software. There had been no mention of the software in the game blurb when I signed up.

An initiative roll and 3 rounds of combat, and about an hour later, it was at the 2-hour mark, and my presence at the table wasn't really necessary for most of the stuff my character did. I was enraged that I was sitting through the most boring game I'd ever attended, and been hoodwinked into watching a software demo for a product I had no use for. The only thing that would make the session worse is if the DM started trying to sell me a timeshare in the spaceship.

About that 2-hour mark of a 4-hour session, the game took a 15-minute break. I used it to take a 2-hour break and visit the vendors' exhibit hall.


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Angry? That is a harsh emotion.

I guess there is one time a game during my college years. It was TORG. My character was an elven wizard from the fantasy realm. BUT during an adventure against the Cyber-Papacy there was some sort of reality test. I failed my save and lost everything on my character connected to any realm other than the Cyber-Papacy. That was everything about my character... I was reduced to the status of an unequipped child with no hope of recovery. So when the session ended I told the GM I was retiring her (she would go join a convent and serve god the rest of her days - fitting considering the effects were that now to her the Cyber-Papacy is the only true reality). And I was going to generate a new character... The GM said NO. She refused to let me just quit and make a new PC just because I lost everything. I asked how I was supposed to adventure with no skills, powers, or equipment? She would hear none of it. So I wandered through the next adventure not caring if I lived or died. Enemy vehicles and soldiers intent on slaughtering us would go out of their way to avoid harming me... It was absolutely absurd. The GM turned her own game into a joke just to anger me. Because somehow I was cheating to retire?


DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I had a 1e character once say OUT OF CHARACTER a word that would cause instant death. The DM said it didn't matter, that it "transcended realities" and no matter who said the word would die, even if someone in another dimension said it, such as my "alter ego in this universe". I believe that was the last game I ever played with him as DM.

Something campaign-specific? Or the old Call of Cthulhu standby Hastur?


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Usual Suspect wrote:

I had a DM that let the party gang rape my character's cohort. The idiot couldn't quite understand why I quit after that. Kept pushing to know why I quit coming to the game (I had made a polite excuse as to why I wouldn't be back). He was terribly upset when I explained what a douchbag move it was for the DM to ignore evil actions in a game where he had specifically outlawed evil characters. Most of his players thought it was hillarious. Honestly, 3 twenty-something guys couldn't figure out why rape isn't fin or funny.

Pretty much ruined gaming for a year as I wasn't even interested in role-playing because of that.

Okay, that is one of the stupidest things I've ever heard. Are you sure they were 20-something and not 12 year olds? I'm glad to see that you do not find that type of thing funny.

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I went to a PFS game at a local game store, playing a 2nd-level character. The GM is a young man (possibly under 20?) who announces up front that he's only recently started PFS (just a few games under his belt) and this is his first time GMing but he wants to help out; he courteously apologizes in advance for whatever errors he might make in his first run. Two seats to my left is a guy I hadn't met before (I think he was new?) who seemed excited to play his new rogue. Then there's this guy sitting immediately to my left (between me and the rogue player). Your typical middle-aged playing-for-decades type.

During the first combat, our brand-new GM makes his first error of the session, accidentally skipping one of the players' turns—an error that no GM ever stops making. The skipped player was the guy to my left, between me and the rogue newbie. He has apparently been keeping an eye on the GM's combat pad, as he catches the error immediately (before the first round is over) and is instantly on his feet and waving his arms around and rolling his eyes and letting out heavy sighs as he points out the error and physically reaches across the table to adjust the GM's combat pad for him.

After a bit of effort, the first-time GM manages to get combat back on track and the grognard back in his chair.

Not long later (can't remember if it was the same encounter or not), it becomes apparent that the newbie rogue player has misunderstood Sneak Attack and thinks he adds 1d6 to his attack roll. "Mr. Helpful" is quick to jump in with corrections and a hands-on tour of the rogue player's own character sheet, and continues to basically "parent" him for the rest of the session—during which time the previously eager/smiling/talkative rogue player is spending most of the session silently casting a look of irritated resignation down at his own folded arms.

I'm not sure he ever came back for another session.

Meanwhile, the session goes on, with Mr. Helpful making additional irrelevant corrections to the GM ("No, the PCs come in through this door; I've run this before"). In one fight, I have my squishy caster who found himself ambushed in melee withdraw to a safe distance. Mr. Helpful asks if I have a spiked gauntlet, I tell him no, and I then get an animated lecture about how I could be more of a team player by helping his monk get a flank.

----------------------------------

On the bright side, the newbie GM wasn't scared away from PFS forever and seems to still be enjoying himself (and even still GMing sometimes).


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I'm really feeling lucky right now. I've never had that type of an experience in a game. The last RPG I quit was due to personality conflicts with a player not due to the DM. I really liked that DM but I couldn't handle the personal hygiene of the player in question and I was volunteered to give the player a ride there and back.


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Jiggy wrote:

I went to a PFS game at a local game store, playing a 2nd-level character. The GM is a young man (possibly under 20?) who announces up front that he's only recently started PFS (just a few games under his belt) and this is his first time GMing but he wants to help out; he courteously apologizes in advance for whatever errors he might make in his first run. Two seats to my left is a guy I hadn't met before (I think he was new?) who seemed excited to play his new rogue. Then there's this guy sitting immediately to my left (between me and the rogue player). Your typical middle-aged playing-for-decades type.

During the first combat, our brand-new GM makes his first error of the session, accidentally skipping one of the players' turns—an error that no GM ever stops making. The skipped player was the guy to my left, between me and the rogue newbie. He has apparently been keeping an eye on the GM's combat pad, as he catches the error immediately (before the first round is over) and is instantly on his feet and waving his arms around and rolling his eyes and letting out heavy sighs as he points out the error and physically reaches across the table to adjust the GM's combat pad for him.

After a bit of effort, the first-time GM manages to get combat back on track and the grognard back in his chair.

Not long later (can't remember if it was the same encounter or not), it becomes apparent that the newbie rogue player has misunderstood Sneak Attack and thinks he adds 1d6 to his attack roll. "Mr. Helpful" is quick to jump in with corrections and a hands-on tour of the rogue player's own character sheet, and continues to basically "parent" him for the rest of the session—during which time the previously eager/smiling/talkative rogue player is spending most of the session silently casting a look of irritated resignation down at his own folded arms.

I'm not sure he ever came back for another session.

Meanwhile, the session goes on, with Mr. Helpful making additional irrelevant corrections to the...

I'm always happy to have someone give me advice as a player or as a GM but I hate people like that guy who feel they have to be an a$$ about it.


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Triphoppenskip wrote:
I'm always happy to have someone give me advice as a player or as a GM but I hate people like that guy who feel they have to be an a$$ about it.

While I obviously wasn't there, it sounds less like he was trying to be ass (to the rogue) And more like honestly trying to help and f+@+ing it up. And honestly, I'm probably guilty of that same infraction.


Trigger Loaded wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I had a 1e character once say OUT OF CHARACTER a word that would cause instant death. The DM said it didn't matter, that it "transcended realities" and no matter who said the word would die, even if someone in another dimension said it, such as my "alter ego in this universe". I believe that was the last game I ever played with him as DM.
Something campaign-specific? Or the old Call of Cthulhu standby Hastur?

It was campaign specific. We ran a "shared" campaign world and it was his turn to DM. We stayed friends, but I made it clear I wouldn't play when he DM'd ever again.

Liberty's Edge

@ Arranna

Torg is a fun rpg. Yet if one botched a reality skill check it can have some serious consequences. In one game a Tharkold Techno Demon botched a reality skill check in the Living Land. His character died. ThT being said your gm was being a very bad one. If it was me I would have allowed you to make a new character.


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We'd just started Rune Lords recently. I had my Magus. A friend of mine who has always been a bit confrontational also played a Magus. I should have know this wasn't going to turn out well when he wanted to trade spells when I really had everything all planed out.

My GM started to tell me how I didn't know what I was doing though I was pretty sure I knew how the magus worked (I got most from guides and from the boards here). I got the distinct feeling he didn't know much about the Magus and he was the type who read rule books for fun (kind of strange that way).

Anyway, I got to second level and I started using that Arcane Mark TWF thing and I got strange looks and questions but otherwise everything was fine. I noticed the other guy was not counting his Arcane pool correctly though.

Later at 3rd level, I decided to use spellstrike again and this time with shocking grasp. I hit. I followed the rules as I was told. Then he jumped like a cat (the other guy playing a magus) "NO THAT'S NOT HOW IT WORKS" (yes, he yelled). He claimed the spell strike worked with both of my attacks not with just the one. I tried to argue with the guy but he has this method where he gets louder with his argument. And then the GM was agreeing with him. I KNEW I was right but I was getting so frustrated and I didn't want to deal with these two and I blew up. I told them I had enough of the character and I didn't want to play the Magus anymore. (I was good enough to at least finish the session)

The other player told me he was sorry the next time we played and that the only reason he blew up was that we were playing the same class.

I ended up creating the one class that everyone said I should play that I promised I wouldn't, a bard (it's an Arcane Duelist)

I have seen yelling going on every so often at our game; mostly from the GM. But this was the first time (hopefully the last time) it came from me.


My invasion of Asia failed due to to lucky rolls from my friend. I punched the table and quitted in puff. aargh!

I understand it's not a role-playing game session, but nothing gets to me like a game of Risk.

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Laurefindel wrote:

My invasion of Asia failed due to to lucky rolls from my friend. I punched the table and quitted in puff. aargh!

I understand it's not a RPG, but nothing gets to me like a game of Risk.

Never get involved in a land war in Asia.

Liberty's Edge

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Well NGC unless your enjoying the game alot I would have probably left. It's one thing to get yelled at by a player. But the reason given was poor even if he apologized. That's like a date that goes bad because both people order a coffee at the end of their dinner.

Silver Crusade

Angry, more frustrated. My friends and I were starting to play Rune Lords, and I wanted to play a wizard, but I played a wizard in a our last gaming session, and I am playing a wizard in my solo campaign. He told me no, because I have to try a different class, so I chose a witch, which I liked, but this move was in conjunction so that our third compatriot could play a druid because our druid friend loves having animal companions. My friend, who was organizing the game, but I end up GMing the game, tells me that I should choose a spellcaster class that doesn't have all the umph of attack spells that a wizard has, so I should let our druid friend cast all the umph spells, but our druid friend rarely casts spells, he only cares about his giant pet ant. He doesn't know his spells, doesnt' prepare spells, and most of the time is drawing great art, but not paying attention. My friend who organized the game, decides to create three characters, though one character has a character trait from each of the sections, he claims he has a great story reason for this, I don't know what the reason is. Finally, when I get to play, though I GMing and playing my witch at the same time, and I only have 15mins to prepare and my friend gets upset that we don't enjoy all the games at the Swallow Tail festival. Then, my friends encourage me to roll dice for every ick factor I see in combat which will induce vomiting, such as seeing bitten off heads from goblins, which I thought was fun at first, I felt my character became the joke of the campaign. My friend said that my character was the foible of the group, showing all the failings of the other characters, but I think my character is a joke. I am going to kill off my character and start a new if we ever get to play again. Between, two jobs, my masters work on Latino Literature as well as my beautiful wife who is pregnant with our third child, I am too busy to play.


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Usual Suspect wrote:

I had a DM that let the party gang rape my character's cohort. The idiot couldn't quite understand why I quit after that. Kept pushing to know why I quit coming to the game (I had made a polite excuse as to why I wouldn't be back). He was terribly upset when I explained what a douchbag move it was for the DM to ignore evil actions in a game where he had specifically outlawed evil characters. Most of his players thought it was hillarious. Honestly, 3 twenty-something guys couldn't figure out why rape isn't fin or funny.

Pretty much ruined gaming for a year as I wasn't even interested in role-playing because of that.

Wow, that's an asinine group. The DM wouldn't have had to push me to know why I left...

Rape is something that the heroes kill villainous NPCs for doing, not something that PCs do because lolz the evulz!
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The Indescribable wrote:
Triphoppenskip wrote:
I'm always happy to have someone give me advice as a player or as a GM but I hate people like that guy who feel they have to be an a$$ about it.
While I obviously wasn't there, it sounds less like he was trying to be ass (to the rogue) And more like honestly trying to help and f!@@ing it up. And honestly, I'm probably guilty of that same infraction.

Yeah, few asses realize that they're being asses; they think they're being helpful, and just don't recognize subtle social cues like crossed arms and monosyllabic mutters.

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ngc7293 wrote:
Later at 3rd level, I decided to use spellstrike again and this time with shocking grasp. I hit. I followed the rules as I was told. Then he jumped like a cat (the other guy playing a magus) "NO THAT'S NOT HOW IT WORKS" (yes, he yelled). He claimed the spell strike worked with both of my attacks not with just the one. I tried to argue with the guy but he has this method where he gets louder with his argument. And then the GM was agreeing with him. I KNEW I was right but I was getting so frustrated and I didn't want to deal with these two and I blew up. I told them I had enough of the character and I didn't want to play the Magus anymore. (I was good enough to at least finish the session)

"I'm sorry, could you repeat that? I couldn't hear you over all the shouting."


My story involves a college games club, and the first Geek Social Fallacy.

So I had been part of my school's games club for a while, making periodic efforts to start a regular D&D game together. It never lasted because of different class schedules, conflicting personalities, and most club members being like cats that had to be herded. I decided to give DMing at the school one last go, and to run the game outside of the club room in order to avoid the distraction of other games and people, and so that I wouldn't be obligated to welcome just anyone who wanted to play.

Game day comes, and I show up at the club room to lead the players to the building I had planned to for the game. In addition to the players I knew would be coming, one very loud and obnoxious guy wants to join. I told him straight up that he wasn't welcome because I knew I wouldn't be able to deal with his personality. He insisted that he could tone himself down, but he has some kind of disability -- ADD, ADHD? -- so I knew he couldn't for long, despite his best efforts. So I told him I'd be happy to play a shorter game like Magic with him, but not a lengthy game like D&D.

At this point, a couple of the other players say they want to play at the club, despite my planned game area being literally one building over. One of these players is the club's president. I tell them that one of the reasons I want to get away from the club is so that we're not obligated to game with Mr. Obnoxious, who I knew they didn't want to game with either. But then one of the club officers, who I suspect has a similar disability, tells me that if we give Mr. Obnoxious a chance for one game session, we can then game without him on games club turf if he doesn't work out. The club president hears her tell me this, without commenting on it. Remember this; it comes up later.

The players not wanting to leave the games room were still complaining, so I grudgingly agreed to run the game just outside the games room, and to give Mr. Obnoxious his chance. He manages to keep himself almost calm for about thirty minutes, and then sure enough, he spirals into all-out nails-on-chalkboard mode. By the time the game session was over, the stress of running the game and dealing with him had literally given me a stomach ache. So I told him sorry, we'd be playing without him next time. At which point he and the club officer told me "Well then you can't play on games club turf."

To which I replied, "But you told me not four hours ago that we could game on games club turf if we gave Mr. Obnoxious his chance."

To which she replied "Yeah, I meant you can play elsewhere after giving him a chance. Thems the rules." There was more, but she never admitted to misleading me -- "A lie of omission isn't a lie" sort of thing -- and the club president never admitted to tacitly supporting her lie by saying nothing at the time. So that was the last time I gamed at or near that games club, or had much of anything to do with any of them.

Because, remember folks: No gaming is better than bad gaming!

Shadow Lodge

True dat.

My own story involves Roll20 and PFS. I signed up a table of the new hotness and happened to get a player who had run it before. No problem, it happens in organized play.

Come the first encounter said player begins correcting me on tactics, across the open G+ hangout. And begins arguing with another of the players at the table. Escalating to "why don't you stop backseat GMing" responded with "why don't you suck it".

This caused the only loss of temper I can remember having at the table when I told them to stop f+@#ing with each other or walk away with zeroed out chronicle sheets.

I'm still amazed to have had such a thing happen.


memorax wrote:

@ Arranna

Torg is a fun rpg. Yet if one botched a reality skill check it can have some serious consequences. In one game a Tharkold Techno Demon botched a reality skill check in the Living Land. His character died. ThT being said your gm was being a very bad one. If it was me I would have allowed you to make a new character.

Thanks.

I did quit that GM and her drama... Oh, and I stole her players away when I did too. :)

As Tequila Sunrise says "no gaming is better than bad gaming" Except when you can seize good gaming from the jaws of bad gaming. I don't think she ever forgave me for stealing her thunder. But really she did deserve it. Never underestimate just how much power players actually have in a game.


TOZ wrote:

True dat.

My own story involves Roll20 and PFS. I signed up a table of the new hotness and happened to get a player who had run it before. No problem, it happens in organized play.

Come the first encounter said player begins correcting me on tactics, across the open G+ hangout. And begins arguing with another of the players at the table. Escalating to "why don't you stop backseat GMing" responded with "why don't you suck it".

This caused the only loss of temper I can remember having at the table when I told them to stop f~#~ing with each other or walk away with zeroed out chronicle sheets.

I'm still amazed to have had such a thing happen.

What does zeroing out the character sheet mean?

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Kelsey Arwen MacAilbert wrote:
TOZ wrote:

True dat.

My own story involves Roll20 and PFS. I signed up a table of the new hotness and happened to get a player who had run it before. No problem, it happens in organized play.

Come the first encounter said player begins correcting me on tactics, across the open G+ hangout. And begins arguing with another of the players at the table. Escalating to "why don't you stop backseat GMing" responded with "why don't you suck it".

This caused the only loss of temper I can remember having at the table when I told them to stop f~#~ing with each other or walk away with zeroed out chronicle sheets.

I'm still amazed to have had such a thing happen.

What does zeroing out the character sheet mean?

Chronicle sheet, not character sheet. It's the organized play record of having completed that adventure, and contains your XP, gold, and so forth that you get to apply to your character. Having it zero'd out means you got nothing from that scenario.


It's easier for me to repost this rather than retype this.

Liberty's Edge

Aranna wrote:
memorax wrote:

@ Arranna

Torg is a fun rpg. Yet if one botched a reality skill check it can have some serious consequences. In one game a Tharkold Techno Demon botched a reality skill check in the Living Land. His character died. ThT being said your gm was being a very bad one. If it was me I would have allowed you to make a new character.

Thanks.

I did quit that GM and her drama... Oh, and I stole her players away when I did too. :)

As Tequila Sunrise says "no gaming is better than bad gaming" Except when you can seize good gaming from the jaws of bad gaming. I don't think she ever forgave me for stealing her thunder. But really she did deserve it. Never underestimate just how much power players actually have in a game.

The sad part she blames and probably will always blame you for "stealing" away her players and ruining her game. After all it's not her fault.

Liberty's Edge

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Another story to add to the topic:

The DM was warned by the two female members of the group if he added shall we call him X to the group they would leave. The rest of the players and myself knew something was wrong. Both members reasons was that X was a male chauvanistic pig with a very low opinion of womenT. he DM was either oblivious or did not care. Or one of those "he can't possibly be that bad" types. Who knows.

Much to the horror of myself and the DM X was as bad as can be. Every female npc he either yelled at. Demanded answers and when they refused X said his character slapped some sense into them. Yes you heard right. We were stunned as a group. The DM reaction was priceless. I think the DM tried talking to X yet he refused to change or alter the way he played at the table.

Next game X shows up again. Our mission was to track a vampire to her nest and remove th threat. So we get to the vampire lair. A abandoned castle or was it keep. We enter were trying to find the vampire when we come across someone doing some housekeeping. X seeing it's a woman decides to interrogate her his way. X also had a way of ignoring everyone at the table as well. So he demands to know where the vampire is. She refuses to tell him. He gets angry and removes his gauntlet to hit the female npc. He does and promptly loses two levels. X is stunned and angered he hits her again and again losing four levels. At this point we were either all laughing or trying hard not to. X finally releasing what's happened rage quits and leaves. Never to be seen again.

Liberty's Edge

Another angry moment:

As a DM seeing the player running the Gunslinger unable to simple math. He had a hard time totaling both his to hit bonuses and damage. Getting nervous and breaking out into a sweat and everything. Both myself and the rest of the players are shocked and looking at each other having a WTH moment.

His brother who is the spitting image of the "Lump" from the GMG. Does not roleplay or very little at the table. Has his brother write up his character sheet because he can't learn the system for "reasons". Then has the stones to complain that he does not get enough roleplaying time at the table. No offence if I put in a npc love interest for a player and he does nothing in terms of roleplaying well then they lose the npc.

It all came to ahead recently with both players kicked out of the game. One time the were not able to show up for a game session because of a BBQ. It happens players have lives outside the game. I usually hold my games Saturdays and they let me know about it on Friday at 8 pm. They knew about it the Monday of the week. Were unwilling to let me know earlier in the week because they have "designated" internet days. But they can play mmos online for hours on end. Angered some of my players at the table and myself to a lesser extent. They could or would not understand why the players were less than impressed with their "designated" internet day reason.

Second time which angered us all and was the final nail in the coffin for them as players and maybe even friends. It was a long stretch between games. I wanted to run my game on a rare Friday night. Stuff kept happening on Saturdays. Some players could not show some could. The above brothers well thought they would try their usually BS. Brother A almost had the nerve to tell me that I told him at the last minute. He realized what he was going to say and stopped short of saying what he wanted to say. He was unable to show. Brother B has a habit of not showing if A will not go. Out of sheer laziness. As I know when it's something he wants to do he is willing to climb everest in a pair of shorts if need be. Tried to give me a maybe answer and finally said yes.

Game day comes around out of the four players who were able to show only two did. One had to do overtime at work and let me know ahead of time. Brother B also does not show up. Does not call or text or even email. We had a short game with something I made up on the fly. Then and there we had become fed up with both. Brother A calls me on Saturday asking if the game was on. In 48 hours he was somehow able to forget the conversation we had. It's to be expected after all as when we last spoke he could not pull himself away from playing a MMO.

Enough is enough they are blacklisted from my games and as friends.

Shadow Lodge

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Liranys wrote:
Usual Suspect wrote:

I had a DM that let the party gang rape my character's cohort. The idiot couldn't quite understand why I quit after that. Kept pushing to know why I quit coming to the game (I had made a polite excuse as to why I wouldn't be back). He was terribly upset when I explained what a douchbag move it was for the DM to ignore evil actions in a game where he had specifically outlawed evil characters. Most of his players thought it was hillarious. Honestly, 3 twenty-something guys couldn't figure out why rape isn't fin or funny.

Pretty much ruined gaming for a year as I wasn't even interested in role-playing because of that.

Okay, that is one of the stupidest things I've ever heard. Are you sure they were 20-something and not 12 year olds? I'm glad to see that you do not find that type of thing funny.
Tequila Sunrise wrote:


Wow, that's an asinine group. The DM wouldn't have had to push me to know why I left...

Rape is something that the heroes kill villainous NPCs for doing, not something that PCs do because lolz the evulz!

The DM was (is?) a Lieutenant in the Army Reserves here in Ohio. The rest of the group was between the ages of 24 and 30 at the time (except me, the old man who was just over 40). They tended to play like a group of drunken frat boys; but at that time it was the only game I could find. Now I have found a whole lot of other gaming opportunities here; thankfully.

And by the time the DM stopped pushing me about why I was dropping from the game I told him to ask his wife (it's still stunning that he has one with his additude) about exactly how funny raping somebody's partner is. Then I think I told him to get F%^*&ed himself; but it's been about 7 years so I can't be sure I remember the specifics.


Odraude wrote:
It's easier for me to repost this rather than retype this.

That, is one of the most asinine and horrible experiences I've ever read. And if my remembrance is correct, his history is so f~%~ing wrong I can't even begin to describe it so I'll start with this. IIRC, the slave trade as it's known now started because rich immigrants to the new colonies kept bringing indentured servants. For those who don't know what that is, for paying their way, an indentured servant would be a legalized slave for a set period of time, but because they were white they could just take off and go somewhere else without fulfilling their contracts. I'm sure the slave trade still existed at the time, but it picked up because black people weren't able to go and live their lives elsewhere like a white person could.

Shadow Lodge

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Odraude wrote:
It's easier for me to repost this rather than retype this.

My sympathies for the loss of your brother, Odraude. I am a retired Air Force member and am always crushed when I hear about the guys that come back, but don't really come back whole on the inside. We lose too many good people that way.

To your brother; SALUTE!

Grand Lodge

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Tequila Sunrise wrote:
Usual Suspect wrote:

I had a DM that let the party gang rape my character's cohort. The idiot couldn't quite understand why I quit after that. Kept pushing to know why I quit coming to the game (I had made a polite excuse as to why I wouldn't be back). He was terribly upset when I explained what a douchbag move it was for the DM to ignore evil actions in a game where he had specifically outlawed evil characters. Most of his players thought it was hillarious. Honestly, 3 twenty-something guys couldn't figure out why rape isn't fin or funny.

Pretty much ruined gaming for a year as I wasn't even interested in role-playing because of that.

Wow, that's an asinine group. The DM wouldn't have had to push me to know why I left...

Rape is something that the heroes kill villainous NPCs for doing, not something that PCs do because lolz the evulz!

I feel like even THAT has to be handled with tact, shouldn't be introduced until you've properly gotten to know the vibe at the table, and still should be used very, very sparingly. (Aside from any other offense it may cause, rape to establish that this is a 'dark' campaign is cliche.)

But what Tequila Sunrise described is just sick. Even if they were evil characters, even if the DM enforced that and made them rewrite all of their character sheets --- some things are just so beyond the pale of human decency I couldn't imagine how anyone would want to play it out in a board game in the first place.


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In all my years of gaming rape or even consensual sex between PC's and or NPC's has yet to come up at the table and I've DMed and played in some pretty gritty campaigns. We've just never felt compelled to work it in, even if there is a romance subplot.

Shadow Lodge

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Even if the DM had slammed the rest of the players for going beyond any boarders of reasonable gaming conduct at that point, I was done with that group. It only got that bad because despite any comment from me that party actions went past CN the DM never even tried to enforce any type of consequences for PC actions. Ever.

Stealing horses from peasants because buying them would cost money; CN.
Stabbing random peasants because they didn't want their horse stolen; CN.
Burning down a building because the bartender didn't give you free meals; CN.

These guys defined murder hobo years before Pathfinder. I had a three hour argument with the DM about the horse theft and peasant murder thing; and the DM just ret-conned it and gave the PCs free horses. Should have left then. But I'd been so lucky to that point. I don't think I really realized that I'd finally found a bad game.


Yeah, yeah, I disagree with you, We're far past chaotic neutral territory when you get to the stabbing. Any decent party could have knocked them out pretty well without the murder. it is still somewhat understandable, but burning down the bartenders business because no free meals, that's just evil. No ifs ands or buts about it.


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I think you mean you agree. Usual Suspect was saying that the DM and players were calling those actions CN but Usual was saying that they should have been classified as evil, yet the DM refused to act on it.


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Hmm, yes, i might have misunderstood, though the horse theft I might agree with.


While ill in Mexico some years ago, I realized (as did my husband) just how ticked I was about him killing characters offboard to "yard trash" in a campaign that, to this day, was probably one of the best he's ever run.

As in *screamed at him* angry. Apparently being delirious can let loose all sorts of random stuff you'd thought you'd buried.

On the upside, it was the start of our own persistent world storytelling style, leading to several campaigns that result from that one, and dealing with the aftermath of things that occurred from it.

I can only imagine what the upstairs neighbors thought I was ranting about at the top of my lungs nearing midnight. The free booze at dinner probably didn't help.

Incidentally: If you must go to an all inclusive, try the Dominican instead.

Shadow Lodge

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Liranys wrote:
I think you mean you agree. Usual Suspect was saying that the DM and players were calling those actions CN but Usual was saying that they should have been classified as evil, yet the DM refused to act on it.

Yes, exactly this.

The Indescribable wrote:
Hmm, yes, i might have misunderstood, though the horse theft I might agree with.

As as for stealing the horses being CN, I guess you could say it was situational. The character than started the horse theft scam put real effort into it despite having plenty of coin. And he wanted to make sure that there were no possible witnesses; so he always planned to kill any peasants or commoners that saw him. Plus he specifically sought out horses from peasant farmers because they were less likely to have guards or know how to fight back. It was a real case of an abusive brute stealing from those that had no way to defend themselves or their property. It might not be the most evil thing you could do; but there was certainly enough thought in it to not be neutral.


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Stealing horses because you don't have money and you need to get somewhere quick: CN.

Stealing horses because you don't have money or don't have time to negotiate a sale and if you don't get to a place soon the BBEG will conquer the world: CG

Stealing horses because you'd rather not pay even though you could: CE.

Grand Lodge

Paladin of Baha-who? wrote:
Stealing horses because you'd rather not pay even though you could: CE.

I think you could still argue the last one is CN, depending on the circumstances. In the circumstances he described, yes, I'd say so. But what if the person you're stealing from is an enormous jerk? Stealing because someone mistreated you seems more along the L/C axis than G/E to me. And what if it was someone who could afford it? I probably wouldn't cause anyone to rewrite "E" on their sheet because they stole a bunch of horses from a stuffy nobleman. It's not good per se, but it creates an inconvenience rather than doing lasting harm. I might make a Paladin answer for it, but the CN Rogue would be safe.


EntrerisShadow wrote:
Paladin of Baha-who? wrote:
Stealing horses because you'd rather not pay even though you could: CE.
I think you could still argue the last one is CN, depending on the circumstances. In the circumstances he described, yes, I'd say so. But what if the person you're stealing from is an enormous jerk? Stealing because someone mistreated you seems more along the L/C axis than G/E to me. And what if it was someone who could afford it? I probably wouldn't cause anyone to rewrite "E" on their sheet because they stole a bunch of horses from a stuffy nobleman. It's not good per se, but it creates an inconvenience rather than doing lasting harm. I might make a Paladin answer for it, but the CN Rogue would be safe.

Right, in the instance being described I believe there was some murderhoboing involved which is definitely more on the evil axis.


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Adventure Path Charter Subscriber
Trigger Loaded wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I had a 1e character once say OUT OF CHARACTER a word that would cause instant death. The DM said it didn't matter, that it "transcended realities" and no matter who said the word would die, even if someone in another dimension said it, such as my "alter ego in this universe". I believe that was the last game I ever played with him as DM.
Something campaign-specific? Or the old Call of Cthulhu standby Hastur?

Appearance Check: 1d100 ⇒ 58

Whew!

I actually do make rolls when my players say that name regardless of what game system we're running and the context. It's been a running joke for some years now. Or so they think...

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