So my pirate PC just made an engine for thier boat.


Advice

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I am running skull and shackles and my PCs decided that they want their boat to go faster.

They just hit 5th level. They found a dire croc and killed to make a fast zombie of it. This fills the clerics bucket for animate undead but the damn thing can carry the boat. Once they get the muleback cords and a heavy lift belt for the thing it can carry a ship plus its 100 tons and still be below light load.

For the record I think this is better then them making a bunch of 5 HD skeletons and bring them into combat with them. This is almost entirely narrative control.

They can now go in any direction at a speed of 120 (always running) and that should be enough to make catching ships easy. It can also tow a ship that has no crew with no problems.

Just wondering what I should do at ports and such.

They paid a lot of money to find they thing and went to a lot of trouble to make it so they can have it. Just want ideas of what to do with that is interesting.


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They are refused docking rights at any harbor because no one wants a zombie croc. Now and then, they have to fight off some Pharasma inquisitors who want to destroy the abomination. Maybe the croc gets loose and goes around eating fishermen while the players are in town.


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Off topic, but I think something like this should provide some kind of Infamy bonus.

Dark Archive

I doubt they would be refused at all ports. The best thing you could do is have other people start copying them. Maybe not to as great an effect, but it would add an in universe arms race that would come from a fresh new idea. Some other boat hires a necromancer to make their boat move, and he can start hiring himself out to the PCs rivals.


Pathfinder says you can't do overland movement at a full run, with no nods to con scores or the tireless nature of the accursed undead. D20 used to rule that creatures without con scores could move up to x3, but x4 wasn't allowed because they couldn't make the endurance checks. It is up to you if that matters. Also I don't know the rules for sailing, but it stands to reason that using both their "engine" and sails (with a favorable wind) should at least partially stack.

As for ports, if the croc stays fully submerged reactions will be mixed. Quite often people won't even see it at first, and might freak out when some wandering urchin or dock guard happens to make his perception check and starts raising the alarm. As Eakratz mentioned it provides infamy which the players can take advantage of. Some harbormasters might angrily demand (or nervously beg, perhaps even offering a bribe) that the PCs drop anchor away from other ships and offer the services of a rowboat to deliver the PCs and their goods if they'll just keep the big monster away from their nice, semi-sanitary piers.

As the infamous Croc Boat Corsairs they'll get offers for certain kinds of work and the interest (good and bad) of evil characters. Perhaps in the same day your boys will be approached by a necromancer looking to make a name for himself (and steal a nice minion), an evil blackguard looking to ride in style, and a goodly (cleric/paladin) trying to remain incognito/slip past good detection spells by riding with scary evil monsters because even the people HUNTING her find the PCs ship "creepy."

Necromantic pollution might cause trouble for local fishing. The negative energy might somehow attract (or drive away) water ghouls. It's long swimming tail could cause problems with other boats that get too close just by accident. All the attention the party's boat gets will make certain brands of sneaky and low-key impossible, but you don't HAVE to sneak into the governor's mansion if he invites you in to make himself look brave by meeting with the captain of the infamous and terrifying zombie-ship.

Finally, depending on the port it is entirely possible that EVERYONE else in town is worse, and they will barely even notice the PC's ship next to the ship crewed by skeletons, the ship that hovers above the water on columns of hellfire, the submarine strapped to a giant sea turtle, and the relatively normal ship that has enough heavy weapons to face all of the above and win.


I foresee issues with maintaining control over the zombie, particularly while the PCs are away. People will do stupid things like play "poke the zombie on a bet" and then the zombie responds without the PCs to keep things in check.

And whether it happens or not, some NPC will likely expect it and confront the PCs about the danger.


Don't fast zombies only get a land speed increase? How is it getting a base swim speed of 30ft? Remember that zombies lose all feats of the base creature so it does not get Run. Zombies also lose all skill ranks, so no bonus to swim from that. Plus there are several ships that can still go faster than 120ft. This doesn't seem like a real problem to me, I might even consider it a hindrance.

However, a fast zombie dire croc carrying a ship ON LAND, now that is something I would be worried about.


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Okay so a dire crocodile has a strength score of 37 and is a gargantuan quadruped.

Str 27 is 346 lb for light load. So str 37 is 1384 lb. For being a gargantuan quadruped you multiply by 12, 16608 lbs.

Mule back cords - Str 45 effective - 51072
Heavy lift belt - 153216 lb

So, patently the idea that they can put their ship on this crocodile's back and carry it along with 100 tons of cargo is false, seeing as 100 tons would be 200000 lb.

An example of 56 ft long boat I found had a weight of 60-70 tons. Or 120,000 - 140,000 lbs. I believe the common length of the ship in Skull and Shackles is 90 ft. So maybe 180,000. Even with everyhting the crocodile has, it is more than his light load.

Also, crocodiles only have the following slots: armor, belt (saddle), chest, eyes, headband, neck. So you could deny the muscleback cords on those grounds (shoulder slot). Also the belt slot should only be usuable for a saddle, not actual belts like the heavyload belt. Again, your decision.

I'm mean sure, it might work okay...if you ignore the rules.


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Mergy wrote:
I doubt they would be refused at all ports. The best thing you could do is have other people start copying them. Maybe not to as great an effect, but it would add an in universe arms race that would come from a fresh new idea. Some other boat hires a necromancer to make their boat move, and he can start hiring himself out to the PCs rivals.

Mergy, this is so good. It puts in all the fun extra encounters you may want and adds consequences without wrecking the story.

As an added suggestion, Pathfinder seas are filled with many aggressive territorial creatures of vast size. Add a % die to your wandering monster encounters while at sea. 1 and 100 draw a hostile kraken or something that attacks the motor only.


Don't forget the +2 str from zombie.

Dark Archive

Claxon wrote:

Okay so a dire crocodile has a strength score of 37 and is a gargantuan quadruped.

Str 27 is 346 lb for light load. So str 37 is 1384 lb. For being a gargantuan quadruped you multiply by 12, 16608 lbs.

Mule back cords - Str 45 effective - 51072
Heavy lift belt - 153216 lb

So, patently the idea that they can put their ship on this crocodile's back and carry it along with 100 tons of cargo is false, seeing as 100 tons would be 200000 lb.

An example of 56 ft long boat I found had a weight of 60-70 tons. Or 120,000 - 140,000 lbs. I believe the common length of the ship in Skull and Shackles is 90 ft. So maybe 180,000. Even with everyhting the crocodile has, it is more than his light load.

Also, crocodiles only have the following slots: armor, belt (saddle), chest, eyes, headband, neck. So you could deny the muscleback cords on those grounds (shoulder slot). Also the belt slot should only be usuable for a saddle, not actual belts like the heavyload belt. Again, your decision.

I'm mean sure, it might work okay...if you ignore the rules.

I'm not sure if the rules account for this, but it is much easier to lift something submerged in water than it is to lift something off the ground. It's also easier to pull a boat than to drag a wagon due to far less friction.

Lastly, item slots relate to animal companions and familiar. There's also nothing stopping them from changing the item's slot.


Nawtyit wrote:

Don't fast zombies only get a land speed increase? How is it getting a base swim speed of 30ft? Remember that zombies lose all feats of the base creature so it does not get Run. Zombies also lose all skill ranks, so no bonus to swim from that. Plus there are several ships that can still go faster than 120ft. This doesn't seem like a real problem to me, I might even consider it a hindrance.

However, a fast zombie dire croc carrying a ship ON LAND, now that is something I would be worried about.

Actually, a fast zombie keeps movement speeds, and a dire croc has a base swim spd of 30'.

Further, the bonus to swim from having a swim speed isn't removed as that is a bonus, so it's swim skill is reduced but not entirely.

--------------------------
An advantage here over other ships,

the zombie croc doesn't need wind, nor does it need to tack at an angle to go against the wind, so in the case of pursuit by an enemy ship, the PCs can go directly against the wind and the pursuers will have to tack to follow, which slows them down and forces them away from the PCs ship.

(for the ininformed, tacking is the zigzagging motion [about 45 degrees to the wind] that sailing ships need to do in order to travel up-wind)


Mergy wrote:

I'm not sure if the rules account for this, but it is much easier to lift something submerged in water than it is to lift something off the ground. It's also easier to pull a boat than to drag a wagon due to far less friction.

Lastly, item slots relate to animal companions and familiar. There's also nothing stopping them from changing the item's slot.

The rules don't account for it, but I agree that it would be easier for the crocodile to pull the boat in water so that the ability to lift isn't really the issue there, the water is supporting the weight. This part isn't really what I was trying to prevent. It was mostly the "crocdile walks onto land with a boat strapped to it's back" part.

However, the items slot rules do not necessarily just apply to animal companions and familiars, in fact there is nothing to suggest that a crocodile animal companion should have any different magic item slots available to it (without the extra slot feat) than a normal crocodile would. Further, reslotting something is purely the purview of a GM, which can be used to deny the actions the players want to take.

If he is looking for legal grounds to deny the player these actions I am attempting to provide them.

Edit: It does occur to me I didn't actually mention that my focus was mostly on denying them the ability to get the boat onto land and not towing the boat with the crocodile in my original post, so now I can see where that would be confusing. Mea culpa.

As far as interesting things to do with an undead crocodile towing the boat...

Kraken?


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Another problem will be all of the creatures that eat dead things in the sea. Sooner or later the only thing that will remain of the croc will be bones. Which are not much good for swimming by themselves.


GM DarkLightHitomi, sorry, read the wrong listing. 30 ft swim is correct.

Shadow Lodge

Savage GM wrote:

Another problem will be all of the creatures that eat dead things in the sea. Sooner or later the only thing that will remain of the croc will be bones. Which are not much good for swimming by themselves.

Savage has definitely got a point. Small fish and a lot of aquatic vermin would eat the body. Though the party's necromancer could regularly channel negative energy to heal it.


Savage GM wrote:
Another problem will be all of the creatures that eat dead things in the sea. Sooner or later the only thing that will remain of the croc will be bones. Which are not much good for swimming by themselves.

Eh. Undead skeletal dragons can still fly, despite not having skin attached to their wings anymore, so the undead skeletal croc should still be able to swim just fine.


The croc will rot and be eaten by small scavengers. In fact in the ocean that will take a surprising short period of time. Crabs are really good at that.

Dark Archive

I think a zombie's natural armour would probably prevent most small fish from munching. There are certainly no rules for zombies decomposing, neither in air nor water.


Tarantula wrote:
Savage GM wrote:
Another problem will be all of the creatures that eat dead things in the sea. Sooner or later the only thing that will remain of the croc will be bones. Which are not much good for swimming by themselves.
Eh. Undead skeletal dragons can still fly, despite not having skin attached to their wings anymore, so the undead skeletal croc should still be able to swim just fine.

At that isn't there a skeletal whale in one of the bestiaries that can still swim.

Edit* if i remember right its the bakekujira


Quote:
Skeletons: A skeleton can be created only from a mostly intact corpse or skeleton. The corpse must have bones. If a skeleton is made from a corpse, the flesh falls off the bones.

If they made the skeleton from the croc, the flesh is already gone, it is just bones.

The Exchange

Mergy wrote:
I think a zombie's natural armour would probably prevent most small fish from munching. There are certainly no rules for zombies decomposing, neither in air nor water.

There are no rules for defecation either, but that doesn't mean the GM is not within his or her rights to assume that the characters poop.

Returning to the subject - if I were a PC, I'd be a little leery of relying on this form of propulsion. Sooner or later I'm going to run into an enemy with the Command Undead feat, halt undead, or Smite Evil. Or one of the big sea monsters attracted by their "engine". I understand that Mathius doesn't really want to "punish" the PCs, but this croc is a big flashy obvious thing - it's only plausible that their enemies in the S&S path are going to hear about it and start packing anti-giant-undead-croc measures.


And if you take the croc on land with the ship, and the party looses the croc somehow, your ship is now stuck inland. NOT GOOD.


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Lincoln Hills wrote:
Mergy wrote:
I think a zombie's natural armour would probably prevent most small fish from munching. There are certainly no rules for zombies decomposing, neither in air nor water.
There are no rules for defecation either, but that doesn't mean the GM is not within his or her rights to assume that the characters poop.

There aren't rules for any non-dead creatures decomposing. Undead are not dead, and so they don't decompose. Assume the magic of the spell is holding them together, the same way that it makes them capable of acting.


I'd say have imitators come about as has been previously suggested, and have potential incidents where Little Timmy got too close to the big scary lizard and ended up as lunch.

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

Honestly, I would applaud the PCs for finding a unique approach to the game and compliment them on it.

Second, I would have an out of character conversation with the group about possible real-game-world ramifications of this choice both positive and negative. So that if they do get targeted by any anti-undead groups they don't feel like they are being punished for being creative.


Yeah, a brief OOC congratulations, and discussion that reactions both good and bad will follow is a good idea.


Tarantula wrote:
Lincoln Hills wrote:
Mergy wrote:
I think a zombie's natural armour would probably prevent most small fish from munching. There are certainly no rules for zombies decomposing, neither in air nor water.
There are no rules for defecation either, but that doesn't mean the GM is not within his or her rights to assume that the characters poop.
There aren't rules for any non-dead creatures decomposing. Undead are not dead, and so they don't decompose. Assume the magic of the spell is holding them together, the same way that it makes them capable of acting.

Decomp or not, it's not gonna stop crabs, etc from eating it.


Kieviel wrote:

Honestly, I would applaud the PCs for finding a unique approach to the game and compliment them on it.

Second, I would have an out of character conversation with the group about possible real-game-world ramifications of this choice both positive and negative. So that if they do get targeted by any anti-undead groups they don't feel like they are being punished for being creative.

Indeed. There's a certain Rule of Cool appeal here. But there ought to be game-world consequences for using a Dark Powers as a motorboat.


DrDeth wrote:
Tarantula wrote:
Lincoln Hills wrote:
Mergy wrote:
I think a zombie's natural armour would probably prevent most small fish from munching. There are certainly no rules for zombies decomposing, neither in air nor water.
There are no rules for defecation either, but that doesn't mean the GM is not within his or her rights to assume that the characters poop.
There aren't rules for any non-dead creatures decomposing. Undead are not dead, and so they don't decompose. Assume the magic of the spell is holding them together, the same way that it makes them capable of acting.
Decomp or not, it's not gonna stop crabs, etc from eating it.

Unless the players liberally apply crabs medicine to affected areas. :P


Maybe I missed seeing this already, but ant haul could make this situation even more ridiculous.

Also, in terms of the zombie roc rotting away, it would cost almost nothing for the necromancer to learn restore corpse. Cast that once or twice a day and the thing should be fine. That combined with natural armor should hopefully prevent it from rotting too much.


Westphalian_Musketeer wrote:
DrDeth wrote:
Tarantula wrote:
Lincoln Hills wrote:
Mergy wrote:
I think a zombie's natural armour would probably prevent most small fish from munching. There are certainly no rules for zombies decomposing, neither in air nor water.
There are no rules for defecation either, but that doesn't mean the GM is not within his or her rights to assume that the characters poop.
There aren't rules for any non-dead creatures decomposing. Undead are not dead, and so they don't decompose. Assume the magic of the spell is holding them together, the same way that it makes them capable of acting.
Decomp or not, it's not gonna stop crabs, etc from eating it.
Unless the players liberally apply crabs medicine to affected areas. :P

You need special soap and a tiny comb.


"DrDeth wrote:
Decomp or not, it's not gonna stop crabs, etc from eating it.

The fact that its an animated dead creature that could chomp the crabs back (protecting itself) sure does.

Assuming the crabs can even get through its DR/5 bludgeoning. A giant crab only does 1d4+2. So 25% of the time it hits it could do 1 damage to the dire croc skeleton(DCS). And its at a +4, while the DCS AC is 27. So a giant crab has a 1.25% chance to do 1 damage per attack.

Meanwhile DCS has 95% chance to hit doing 16-31 damage, meaning 80% of the time it 1 shot knocks out/kills the crab. Oh, and the crab is medium, so the croc gets a free AoO on its way in.

So what exactly is going to be eating the DCS again?


Name of Doom wrote:

Maybe I missed seeing this already, but ant haul could make this situation even more ridiculous.

Also, in terms of the zombie roc rotting away, it would cost almost nothing for the necromancer to learn restore corpse. Cast that once or twice a day and the thing should be fine. That combined with natural armor should hopefully prevent it from rotting too much.

Target: corpse touched

The DCS is not a corpse, it is a skeleton dire crocodile. It would have to be killed in order to have restore corpse cast on it.


Oh, hahaha. I kept reading dire ROC. I was a little bit confused from this thread XD Thanks for clearing that up Tarantula.

But still, ant haul would allow for an even easier time with the carry weight I'm pretty sure.


Y'all are missing the point, the GM doesn't want to take away the PCs toys, s/he wants ideas for interesting reactions (good, bad, and in-between) regarding it.

Critters eating away at the zombie could be an issues, but most undead are "tainted and toxic" as part of the whole blasphemous unliving horror thing. This is also how aquatic ghouls, once INSANELY common, stick around for more than a week. But just because you aren't using this to destroy the party's toys doesn't mean you can't have other things happen, like tainting water supplies, poisoning fish, and/or activating weird curses from the Necromantic Pollution of a big leaky waterlogged zombie floating in the area for extended periods.

It probably can't carry the ship (~100 Imperial tons is a light load) on land but it can drag it (1500 tons) anywhere, especially if it misinterprets an order to keep following something or heading in a direction that has an island in the way and the only guy on watch fell asleep/couldn't wake the captain.

Imagine waking up with your ship halfway up a mountain. Might be good for a laugh and a diplomacy/genocide meeting with a local tribe.

The aforementioned copycats might just want to steal the lovely necromantic motorboat, but an equally-entertaining plot twist is having a boarding party cut the beast loose at full speed into the wind, causing the boat to slowly drift further away from an engine that is swimming away at top speed. Does the party try to chase it down while still fighting the boarding party? Does the Cleric cut it loose in hopes he can wrestle it back under his command if/when it turns about? Do they just let it go? Kind of a jerk move, so the potential reward for fighting the boarders should be high.


Its not inconceivable for an apl5 party to defeat a cr9 dire crocodile...
I'm on board with that so far...
But if I'm reading the zombie template right, a zombie dire croc has 18 hit dice...
I generally have a personal distaste for necromancy but i'm the kinda gm that allows ludicrous so long as the rules support it, and there's at least one member of our current 5th level skulls and shackles group who would probably be very interested in it.

So how exactly does a 5th level character take reliable control of an 18 hit dice zombie?


Vincent Takeda wrote:

Its not inconceivable for an apl5 party to defeat a cr9 dire crocodile...

I'm on board with that so far...
But if I'm reading the zombie template right, a zombie dire croc has 18 hit dice...
I generally have a personal distaste for necromancy but i'm the kinda gm that allows ludicrous so long as the rules support it, and there's at least one member of our current 5th level skulls and shackles group who would probably be very interested in it.

So how exactly does a 5th level character take reliable control of an 18 hit dice zombie?

Under animate dead: "Regardless of the type of undead you create with this spell, you can't create more HD of undead than twice your caster level with a single casting of animate dead. The desecrate spell doubles this limit.

The undead you create remain under your control indefinitely. No matter how many times you use this spell, however, you can control only 4 HD worth of undead creatures per caster level."

5 times 4 is 20, and the cleric had to be 5th level to cast animate dead, so...technically he's still got another 2 HD, in theory.

And command undead is permanent unless the target undead is intelligent, if memory serves, though I don't remember if that shares the same control-cap as animate dead or has a different track and a different cap. PF tried to do away with a lot of "infinite undead army" methods, though I recall hints of people theorycrafting past that. I could be wrong, as much as I like promoting necromancy as "the ultimate in recycling" I don't actually get much use out of it.


There could be a necromancer that decides to jack the corpse since one of that strength is hard to come by unless they kill it themselves. Depending on where you go it could fetch a high price for the sheer strength.


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What was that other idea? Oh yeah, a jet engine made with a magically heated ring and a decanter of endless water.

Have some other pirates in a jet powered pirate ship pull up beside them and challenge them to a race.


How much does an empty ship weigh anyway?
So what happens if command undead hits this thing and then is dispelled?

Thanks for all the ideas. I really like the idea of ports demanding/begging them to please dock way over there.

A sea monster trying to protect territory will also happen.

They are good is skullport because they found a high mucky muck and paid him 1000 GP to waive all future port fees and allow the croc in.

I think decomp will not be an issue since it is so easy to heal him up.

Necrojacking will be an issue.

On the OOC side they have agreed that it will not be be used in combat much. They just want a cool drive for their ship.

Like the idea of boatload (literal) of pharasma's inquisitors dropping by.

Also definitely going to get them and infamy bonus.

Silver Crusade

Perhaps put a metal screw attached to the back of the ship. Have several strong skeletons turning the screw with a handle. It would propel the ship. Perhaps use this to augment sailpower. What's the best power-to-HD ratio achievable by a 5th level caster? How fast will this propel a ship via various mechanical contrivances? Anyone want to do it as a Physics problem?

If you put your skeletons in a box, and tie their limbs to the handle, no one need even know how your 'engine' works. It turns the screw on the back of the boat, when plugged in to this socket. Also, there's no way to see inside, so no trouble in harbour. Every now and then you'd need new skeletons, when the old ones 'wear out'. Negative channeling handles that problem.

There's always the old 'skeletal galley slaves' approach. Again, done properly no one need know. But a lot less subtle.

My ex-partner once played a misunderstood necromancer who harnessed undead to help farm and build things. Used a lot of undead animals, rather than humanoids.


Magda Luckbender wrote:

Every now and then you'd need new skeletons, when the old ones 'wear out'. Negative channeling handles that problem.

You know what handles it better? Bloody bone skeletons. They can never die on their own, they reform after an hour. And fast healing to boot!

Silver Crusade

Can Pathfinder Necromancy accomplish as much as steam power? Anyone care to run the numbers?


Magda Luckbender wrote:
Can Pathfinder Necromancy accomplish as much as steam power? Anyone care to run the numbers?

Doubtful. Even without running the numbers, just compare what can be done with a locomotive steam engine vs. how much muscle power it would take to pull a train of the same weight. Mind you, the skeletal horse doesn't need fueling, so it's an issue of compact over fuel-efficient.

In terms of top speed, a trireme is estimated around 7 to 8 knots (all oars a-rowing and favorable winds), the very first steamship (much larger and therefore slower, also no sails) could average that without going all-out.

Any deeper and we start doing torque equations, so no thank you.

Mathius wrote:

How much does an empty ship weigh anyway?

So what happens if command undead hits this thing and then is dispelled?

REAL quick'n'dirty wiki-walk suggests using 1.5 times the max cargo as the weight of the empty boat. But there are a lot of different kinds of boats.

Command undead may not actually work. First cap for holding up your holy symbol and chanting is cleric's caster level. There are ways of boosting this but I don't remember what they are or how far they go.

If it does and if it then goes away, the text says "like Control Undead spell" which in turn says "revert to previous behavior" (i.e. back under the control of the cleric that made 'em).

The Exchange

could just have someone take control of the undead croc and make them sail into a storm


That reminds me. My GM came to realize that a Goblin Alchemist with a fixation on finding a way to get things to burn underwater is terrifying. I ended up creating a system using potassium to propel our ship at waaaaay beyond safe speeds. It was glorious.


Downright stunning amount of power for a level 5 character. And they say the summoner is broken. Pfft.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

This is an awesome idea, your players are awesome and you are an awesome GM for allowing it. Next pirate themed game I run will certainly have a group of crocodile-riding pirates in it. Legend! :D


*shrug*
So if they get ant haul on the beast the numbers go like this.
47 carry cap(boosted from 39 by +8 due to muleback cords)
so 27 str carry= 1040 max load x4=37 4160 X4= 16640
Gargantuan quadrupeds get a x12 multiplier
So 199680 and Ant haul triples that.
So 599040 pounds
just under 300 U.S tons or 271 Tonnes if we are talking metric.

Thats lifting. Push pull or drag is at least 5 times that. So more like 1400 tons. That swiftly goes out of the realm of reasonable numbers and simply becomes a statistic. But suffice to say that quite a bit of freight.

The creature gets Auto-dropped by the L2 spell Command undead (which has no save for unintelligent undead and its higher level brother Halt undead (which also has no save)
Its motions will likely stir up bigger ocean monsters and due to it being a fast zombie rather than a bleeding skeleton they will need to defend their creation to ensure it survives.

Basically they would be trading one problem for several others with this.
They dominate at ship to ship combat due to not needing a sail to move as they please.
They can knock holes under the water line of boats by having the croc bite them.
So they murder in ship to ship.
Trouble is Monster attacks on their boat would likely become much more frequent and they would need to ensure a method of commanding the crocodile when it is under the ocen waves as necromancers and their creatures do not share a telepathic link.
So if someone were to for example sever the lines between their ship and the crocodile then the crocodile would keep on swimming without them until they fond a way to get it to stop.

Seems amusing and an endless source of plot hooks due to people either disliking, coveting or desiring to smite the gigantic undead crocodile.
Might also cause issue with either the hurricane king (who has a rather powerful druid as an advisor)
Along with Besmara herself being that she has the sphere of influence of sea monsters in the shackles and she really dislikes sharing.

TL:DR Lots of easy methods to disable or remove, provides lots of plot hooks. Passes rule of cool, I'd allow it.

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