How many is too many?


Advice

Lantern Lodge

Is 7 PCs too many for an evil campaign? Can I realistically expect 6-7 NE and CE murder-hobos to cooperate with one another? Looking for advice from a fellow DM that has ran an evil campaign. How did you handle in-character conflict (say conflict of interests, vying for power, etc.) PVP?


Ban CE. Ask your players nicely to try to cooperate with each other.

Problem solved.


PvP may sound cool, but, unless it's very planned and very intentional, its bad. Game-ruining, friendship-ruining bad. Promise.

Even in the best circumstances, bruised relationships are at a high likelyhood.

Shadow Lodge

chaotic evil is by nature attempting to dominate one and other. CE will eventually turn into some form of pvp to decide who is "top dog"

chaotic evil:
A chaotic evil character does what his greed, hatred, and lust for destruction drive him to do. He is vicious, arbitrarily violent, and unpredictable. If he is simply out for whatever he can get, he is ruthless and brutal. If he is committed to the spread of evil and chaos, he is even worse. Thankfully, his plans are haphazard, and any groups he joins or forms are likely to be poorly organized. Typically, chaotic evil people can be made to work together only by force, and their leader lasts only as long as he can thwart attempts to topple or assassinate him.

you need a strong main PC to force the others in line for a CE group to function. usually a CE group should be controlled be a strong LE character, whos code and unwavering adherence to punishing misbehavior will keep the others in check. just make sure they actually want CE and not NE or LE.

NE will be easy to control, as long as they feel the group is a necessity to their own means they will work as a group. once they feel that is no longer the case that NE character will slaughter the lot of them, most likely.

NE is my favorite alignment to play other then LN, because you're Mr. smiles until you don't need to be anymore. the entire campaign that NE alignment should be creating contingency plans and counter measures to "order 66" the group lol.

man NE is fun to play!!

but back to the main question. you can run it as a normal 6-7 person game IF you have a strong main PC, usually LE, to guide them and keep them in check. this PC would need to be the most powerful in combat to function as the leader and be played smart enough to counter their attempts for usurping them. if you can accomplish that it takes a major load off your shoulders.

if every session will be them trying to kill each other it will get old, and taxing on you the gm, fast. so my advice is work with one of your players to be an in game leader and out of game GM aid to ease your burden.

now if you don't have that central PC gluing the chaos together, herding cats i call it, then you may get over your head with GMing.

Sovereign Court

Side Kick, I sort of disagree. A lot of CE people are impulsive and violent and hate-filled. But they still don't murder hobo 100% of the time. If so, they'd be immediately arrested or killed. It's the difference between CE and "Chaotic Stupid" in my opinion.

It's the same thing where LG becomes a trope of a Paladin being a moralistic douche and shoving his alignment down the throats of humanity. CE, at least intelligent CE, realizes that the world is rather hostile to it's intentions and even mere existence.

It hides itself and cooperates with like-minded individuals. My 2 copper at least, based on the PRD... The 3rd party SRD site is using the old material I think (it also isn't sourced to a book and page, ergo I trust it very little)

"Chaotic Evil
If I want something, I take it. Might is right. The strong rule the weak. Respect me or suffer. Fear me. There is only today, and today I take what I need. Anger brings out the best in me. I am the stronger one.

Core Concepts: Anarchy, anger, amorality, brutality, chaos, degeneracy, freedom, profaneness, violence

A chaotic evil character is driven entirely by her own anger and needs. She is thoughtless in her actions and acts on whims, regardless of the suffering it causes others.

In many ways, a chaotic evil character is pinned down by her inherent nature to be unpredictable. She is like a spreading fire, a coming storm, an untested sword blade. An extreme chaotic evil character tends to find similarly minded individuals to be with—not out of any need for company, but because there is a familiarity in this chaos, and she relishes the opportunity to be true to her nature with others who share that delight."

There *is* a strongman NPC (level 9) and the PCs are level 1. I think in time they'll deal with him, but I want the players to realize that CE doesn't mean they turn on each other and murder hobo. I mean heck even CE Goblins and CE Orcs don't murder their young or own kind, right?

Shadow Lodge

taldanrebel2187 wrote:

Side Kick, I sort of disagree. A lot of CE people are impulsive and violent and hate-filled. But they still don't murder hobo 100% of the time. If so, they'd be immediately arrested or killed. It's the difference between CE and "Chaotic Stupid" in my opinion...

..."Chaotic Evil
If I want something, I take it. Might is right. The strong rule the weak. Respect me or suffer. Fear me. There is only today, and today I take what I need. Anger brings out the best in me. I am the stronger one.

Core Concepts: Anarchy, anger, amorality, brutality, chaos, degeneracy, freedom, profaneness, violence

A chaotic evil character is driven entirely by her own anger and needs. She is thoughtless in her actions and acts on whims, regardless of the suffering it causes others.

In many ways, a chaotic evil character is pinned down by her inherent nature to be unpredictable. She is like a spreading fire, a coming storm, an untested sword blade. An extreme chaotic evil character tends to find similarly minded individuals to be with—not out of any need for company, but because there is a familiarity in this chaos, and she relishes the opportunity to be true to her nature with others who share that delight."

There *is* a strongman NPC (level 9) and the PCs are level 1. I think in time they'll deal with him, but I want the players to realize that CE doesn't mean they turn on each other and murder hobo. I mean heck even CE Goblins and CE Orcs don't murder their young or own kind, right?

but here is the issue, your own opinion of CE is not the same as the definition as written in the book. the book has a clear concise definition of CE. if it doesnt match that definition then it isnt CE. you may choose to alter that as a GM but that doesnt change that fact.

and yes orcs do kill there own kind. they are like lions, they exist in a pride, or society, but once the opportunity presents it's self the male lions will attack and kill, if necessary, to be the top male of that pride. that specific mentality or set of actions is exactly as written in the CE descriptor.

and no im not saying male lions are CE, im saying male lions have a instinct to usurp each other. if lions raped, pillaged, and tortured other lions for fun or profit then they would be CE.

Liberty's Edge

Chaotic Evil is "doing what I feel like" (Chaotic) and "not caring about innocents while doing it" (Evil).

It does not force the player to have his PC act like a jerk. No alignment does this in fact. Jerkitude is always a (bad) player's choice.

Belkar in OOTS is a good example of CE able to work with a party (even with LG guys).

Liberty's Edge

TheSideKick wrote:
but here is the issue, your own opinion of CE is not the same as the definition as written in the book. the book has a clear concise definition of CE. if it doesnt match that definition then it isnt CE. you may choose to alter that as a GM but that doesnt change that fact.

If RAW alignments were so clearly and undisputedly described, we would not have that many alignment threads, I believe ;-)

Shadow Lodge

The black raven wrote:
TheSideKick wrote:
but here is the issue, your own opinion of CE is not the same as the definition as written in the book. the book has a clear concise definition of CE. if it doesnt match that definition then it isnt CE. you may choose to alter that as a GM but that doesnt change that fact.
If RAW alignments were so clearly and undisputedly described, we would not have that many alignment threads, I believe ;-)

alignment threads stem from personal morality and opinion. people view alignments in this game not in a RAW mentality like they should, but in a abstract personal view(RAI). thats where alignment threads turn into philosophical debates that span pages.

remember that alignments are black and white in this game, there is no grey unless they gm decides to bend away from that system, which then becomes a "home rules" territory.


I follow the just because we are different alignments doesn't mean we can't be friends...or just because we are evil doesn't mean we can't be friends.

CE folk are basically bullies. We have all known bullies. Are they constantly hitting each other? No, they are grouped together and hitting the non-bullies. Are they doing this all of the time? No, they are doing it when the authorities aren't watching.

Every alignment is playable as a sane character that acts in its own interest which usually doesn't involve behavior so extreme as to be suicidal.


Discuss beforehand

This is what I do with my kingslayer AP for CE pc's

How evil do they wish to be
Do they really wish to have PvP
Give them all a common goal/master that ties to them together, at least initially

It's odd and I don't know why but 6 pc's is fine to GM but 7 always seem really hard work. It may just be an issue of space, seating arrangement etc.


I've only run a full evil party 3.5 campaign once at the request of my group who wanted to give it a shot. I told them at the start that I wasn't interested in running a PVP free for all. There would be campaign goals to accomplish like any other campaign, and I'd expect them to work together. However, the tactics of accomplishing those goals could be as unsavory as they desired.

To ensure this, I also created a NPC benefactor who proved not only to be much more deadly than the party, but also ruthless in his expectation of them to work together. He was also apparently immortal (like Gemma Himuro from Ninja Scroll) after making some kind of bargain with Nerual. Early in the campaign, an avatar of Nerual arrived to soul bind the PC's to one another. While they still thought and acted independently, mortal pain was shared by all. I intentionally left the details of the connection vague, but it allowed them to know when another was in danger or pain and helped to keep them working on shared interests. Eventually, it would be up to the party to research the nature of the NPC's immortality and assassinate him if the cared to be free from his influence, but they never did.

The ultimate goal of the campaign was to start a second rebellion in Hell, but the campaign dissolved well before that. My players decided they didn't care for the dark and dirty side of their alignments (missions to assassinate children, human sacrifices, making deals with devils they knew were going to double-cross them, etc.) so we moved on to other campaigns.

As with any game, make your expectations as a GM clear from the start.


It can be amazingly awesome.
I played one by our usual GM, and we became the biggest crime ring in Varisia. Composed of Norgorber worshiping sociopaths and other suitably evil deities, we had a blast.
My Angelkin Aasimar Weapon Master devoted to Ajids. Was fond of taking the hands of my victims in combat, and their scalps out of it. I garnered a rather foul reputation in Magnimar and Korvosa, but was more than welcome in Kaer Maga and feared in Riddleport. In Urglin, I was ignored.
We had half-elf Inquisitor of Norgorber who was the unofficial party boss.
We also had a Demon-Spawn Tiefling cavalier and his goblin squire (took the leadership feat, got a goblin feral gnasher who, for some reason, couldn't stop biting his pony mount), and finally a human necromancer wizard.
We mostly dealt in the slave trade, and in time we took to leading raids on Shoanti tribes for fresh meat, unloading our captures in Kaer Maga. We had decent contacts all around, especially in that ancient city as well as contacts in Urglin for Orc and half-orc mercenaries and all sorts of work.
We actively managed to destabilize Korvosa further through rather vicious acts of terror, allowing our partners to raid further into Korvosa's holdings, basically forcing them to choose either Magnimar or Riddle Port for protection.
We attacked again and again the Hellknights, wiping out several raiding parties that came for us, and finally managed to take over a crime ring in Riddleport, all the while keeping Kaer Maga as our base of operations, though we did visit on occasion the ancient city of Xin Shalast, mostly to do work for the Rune giant king there.
Overall, we had a ton of stuff to do and had a blast being bastards.


Hi bob_the_monster.

I find that my ability to GM, in a way that I feel satisfactory, slips at around 8 players. However it is my belief that how many players you can handle depends on the GM and how well your players cooperate and leave room for their fellow players.

If you can expect them to realistically cooperate? Well, I'd say yes, if you lay the groundrules at the beginning. At my table I usually (depends on the story, but usually) tell my players that they can make whatever character they like, I just want them know that I expect as many compromises and slight breakings of "what their character would do" as needed to keep the story flowing, keep the party together, and the fun going.

To me, it does not matter if your players make Lawful, Neutral or Chaotic characters. It will certainly define alot of their behavior, but as long as everyone agrees to the above, there should no real complications.

Hope you have fun :)

-Nearyn

RPG Superstar 2011 Top 16

Players are going to come into conflict, and in most normal circumstances they are prevented from acting violently on these conflicts by alignment or local law or personal morality. However, in an evil game where these things aren't present things are going to get bloody. If the human supremacist slaver wizard doesn't come to blows with the orc barbarian warlord than something is going seriously wrong.

As many above have said, if you are going to play an evil game you need to lay down some basics. Lets not say "ground rules", but rather a baseline that you need to make all your players aware of. If they want to kill each other, fine, but then they need to be aware that some of them are going to die, and if you don't want to die then don't piss each other off. I've literally had a long running evil campaign for 7-10 players where we all know that the orc barbarian and the human wizard are going to fight. After a few sessions when the situation was ideal and one jumped the other we sat back, watched the fight and everyone had fun placing bets. When one of them was dead they shook hands and the vanquished moved to a side table to begin drafting a new character.

Bad guys draw power from all manner of dubious sources, pacts with demons, terrible dragons, cursed items etc. Use this to your advantage. As the DM you are that terrible dragon, and if your players can't handle being evil like adults then be the angry dragon and punish them like children! There is always a learning curve when a group starts playing in a new style for the first time, and as the DM you need to lay down your expectations with the same fervor that they are trying to take to it.

The problem with being the villain is that it entails doing something villainous. This is something you need to do to someone, and the other players in the group make juicy targets. You need to make other aspects of the game seem juicier. This doesn't mean a valley of peaceful unicorns for them to slaughter so much as it means someone for them to gain power/control over. I have found that this type of thing works best when the PC's start out as elites under a more powerful figure. Having plenty of other NPCs of their power level to interact with and screw over really helps to steer things away from pissing each other off. And having a terrifying boss to keep them in line forces them to work together until they actually want to.

Present them with things they know they are going to regret, but won't be able to help but doing anyways. Giving the party the Monkey's Paw basically says "ok guys, here's five wishes. EACH.", "but if you use them it will be terrible and you will regret it." Now, you as a DM need to be aware that they are most definitely going to use them, but who uses them first and which player the rest of the party is actually afraid of getting the 'Paw will surprise you. As the party begins to learn that as they become more free to do the things their cruel hearts desire, so to will the consequences of these things become more severe. Eventually you will reach a point where the players are making these decisions not to hurt each other, but to invite your retribution onto themselves, because they know they deserve it and it will make for fun story. The best evil campaigns are the ones where the players hate their characters (but still love playing them) and steer them towards ruin because it's what they deserve. The best evil campaigns drive themselves.


Quote:

Evil characters and creatures debase or destroy innocent life, whether for fun or profit.

Evil implies hurting, oppressing, and killing others. Some evil creatures simply have no compassion for others and kill without qualms if doing so is convenient. Others actively pursue evil, killing for sport or out of duty to some evil deity or master.
Quote:

Chaotic characters follow their consciences, resent being told what to do, favor new ideas over tradition, and do what they promise if they feel like it.

Chaotic characters follow their consciences, resent being told what to do, favor new ideas over tradition, and do what they promise if they feel like it.

Reading these I can see a group of CE creatures getting along and going on adventures. This is why Orc, Goblins, ect are all CE. They might fight with each other, but outsiders are a killed, butcher, deep fried and shared with their group.

Quote:

A chaotic evil character does what his greed, hatred, and lust for destruction drive him to do. He is vicious, arbitrarily violent, and unpredictable. If he is simply out for whatever he can get, he is ruthless and brutal. If he is committed to the spread of evil and chaos, he is even worse. Thankfully, his plans are haphazard, and any groups he joins or forms are likely to be poorly organized. Typically, chaotic evil people can be made to work together only by force, and their leader lasts only as long as he can thwart attempts to topple or assassinate him.

Chaotic evil represents the destruction not only of beauty and life, but also of the order on which beauty and life depend.

This description I wouldn't be able to understand how they could get through a week without killing each other. This makes CE sound like mindless killing machines. It sounds like they couldn't team up even to make fire, much less be a real threat to anyone.

This is why there is no good RAW when it comes to alignments, their descriptions don't work well with themselves.

I would go with the first descriptions. A group of free thinkers who don't want to be kept down by the 'man' and don't have any moral compunctions about what they do (the ends justify the means).
The party might be a democracy where everyone's vote counts, and are allowed to speak their mind. They could even care and help one another. People outside the group however are cattle. They will kill someone for looking at them wrong and eat children (beardless goat).
---
Just because you're evil doesn't mean you don't have family.
Just because you're evil doesn't mean you don't have friends.
Just because you're evil doesn't mean your not popular.
Just because you're evil doesn't mean your not fun.

Sovereign Court

PRD says:

"An extreme chaotic evil character tends to find similarly minded individuals to be with—not out of any need for company, but because there is a familiarity in this chaos, and she relishes the opportunity to be true to her nature with others who share that delight."

Seems cut and dry to me. Chaotic Evil !== Murderhobo. They are not mindless killing machines, and even evil dragons are not entirely feral. There's a cognitive dissonance we employ when imagining 'evil', in my opinion. We tend to imagine evil like a saturday morning cartoon show, rather than methodical, organized or in groups.

CE might be low on the empathy scale, but I think that these sorts do have genuine motives. Or even people they actually love or care about. There are CE characters in various novels that cooperate with good PCs because they want to destroy a natural enemy (good example being the Vampires in Carrion Crown) or preserve their own interests. Heck if some of these liches and dragons wait centuries for their plots to unfold, doesn't that sort of imply that CE isn't just murder hobos?

If evil were so blatantly self-destructive, why did entire nations have to ally to bring down their plans?


bob_the_monster wrote:
Is 7 PCs too many for an evil campaign? Can I realistically expect 6-7 NE and CE murder-hobos to cooperate with one another? Looking for advice from a fellow DM that has ran an evil campaign. How did you handle in-character conflict (say conflict of interests, vying for power, etc.) PVP?

To keep combat moving at a pace where participants don't lose interest or wander off and to allow me to write in subplots for each character over the course of the campaign, I won't GM a group bigger than five. Four is preferable, but five or less is where I draw the line.

I honestly can't imagine how these 7, 8, 9 and even 10 groups ever get anything done. Kudos to you guys.


The game I primarily focus on (and enjoy most) at the moment is Way of the Wicked. We have 6 players and a cohort in our party all of varying evil alignments. In that campaign we had any and all concerns assuaged right out of the gate after escaping the prison we all met in whilst awaiting our much deserved executions at the hands of the “holy rollers” that had apprehended us. The main Plot Device villain/Overseer, an Asmodean Cardinal forced us all to sign a Fiendish Pact that all but ensured that there’d be no whacked out wolves-falling-upon-one-another antics out of us as a whole. It covered everything from the usual back-stabbery and double dealing to fair and equal loot distribution. No one has tested it so far.


Aazhog wrote:
The game I primarily focus on (and enjoy most) at the moment is Way of the Wicked. We have 6 players and a cohort in our party all of varying evil alignments. In that campaign we had any and all concerns assuaged right out of the gate after escaping the prison we all met in whilst awaiting our much deserved executions at the hands of the “holy rollers” that had apprehended us. The main Plot Device villain/Overseer, an Asmodean Cardinal forced us all to sign a Fiendish Pact that all but ensured that there’d be no whacked out wolves-falling-upon-one-another antics out of us as a whole. It covered everything from the usual back-stabbery and double dealing to fair and equal loot distribution. No one has tested it so far.

I'm running that AP myself, though with four. I chose to do away with the 'contract' - the group I'm playing with all know one another well and want to work together to accomplish great and exciting things, not engage in one-upmanship, so I didn't feel it was needed. I just sat them down ahead of time and told them that the AP would primarily involve serving a high-ranking Asmodean cleric in a grand scheme. They were all for it and off we went.

Similar scenario when we ran through Skull n' Shackles - everyone agreed ahead of time that they wanted to be pirates working together aboard a ship engaging in piracy. That they'd choose a captain and follow him or her for as long as was reasonable. That was all it took. If you're running a party - especially a big one - where you have players who are more likely to start trouble with their fellow PC's for kicks than pursue the common goal of the story at hand, you (the generic you) might want to reconsider your membership.

I appreciated the mechanism of the contract, but it seemed unnecessary to me - of course it probably helped that two of my four PC's were already a Cleric and a Paladin of Asmodeus. The way in which Way of the Wicked kicks off is the very definition of 'rail road', and I'd rather set the party up for success ahead of time than enforce game mechanics that run roughshod over their free will.


Wiggz: It's an awesome AP, I have probably had more fun playing that than any other in recent memory. I don't have any doubt that a co-operative party with mature players that understand that playing together regardless of alignment is the way to go. And ultimately that's why we all game together with our regular friends. But if you ever had a worry, not much beats the legalese handcuffs of Devil's and their paperwork. ;)

To quote the Asmodean cleric in our party when presented with the contract, "No problem, I've been drinking the kool-aide for years."


Oh and use the infamy rules as well


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Aazhog wrote:

Wiggz: It's an awesome AP, I have probably had more fun playing that than any other in recent memory. I don't have any doubt that a co-operative party with mature players that understand that playing together regardless of alignment is the way to go. And ultimately that's why we all game together with our regular friends. But if you ever had a worry, not much beats the legalese handcuffs of Devil's and their paperwork. ;)

To quote the Asmodean cleric in our party when presented with the contract, "No problem, I've been drinking the kool-aide for years."

LOL - that's great.

Where in the campaign are you (without spoiling anything for innocent bystanders)? It'd be interesting to exchange note - I've rewritten many parts of it, adding a little here, taking away a little there. I've had to work to challenge my party, but its a pretty powerful foursome:

Dwarven Cleric of Asmodeus (Madness, Glory-Heroism) playing as a fanatic and leader of the group through bullying and devotion more than his Charisma of 5. Powerful as he is, he'd still be on the run and hiding in ditches if not for his young protege...

Tiefling Paladin of Asmodeus built as a straight up Paladin, merely transpose any 'good' abilities for 'evil' and vice versa. High charisma and serves as the group's face but was all but raised by the Dwarf and feels beholden to him - or would if not for...

Half-Elven Master Summoner, a seductive bon vivant who summons devils and fiendish creatures to serve her capricious whims. There was doubt that she would ever love anyone until she met our Tiefling anti-hero over whom she's become quite infatuated with - much to the dismay of...

Half-Elven Summoner, a brutish woman, half-elven and half-orc, half sister to the Master Summoner above and the one whom determined their course unquestioned before she met the Tiefling. She is all but devoid of humanity, and her closeness with her eidolon goes beyond intimate.

Its been a really great dynamic, the Cleric and the Summoner both classic alphas in their play while the Paladin and the Master Summoner have bonded in such a way that each has found the courage to stand up to their mentors from time to time. Role-play aside, I'm sure you can see how potent those race/class combinations might be if well-built. FWIW, in our games Summoners don't get the Summon Monster SLA and Master Summoners don't get an eidolon. Goes a long way towards balancing the classes.

EDIT: The Tiefling took a level of Oracle when they made their oaths to the Cardinal, choosing the Legalistic curse to go with the Lore mystery to reflect his education at the hands of the Dwarf. The Summoner eventually took a level of Dragoon and often fights astride her eidolon when the terrain favors it.


Quote:

LOL - that's great.

Where in the campaign are you (without spoiling anything for innocent bystanders)? It'd be interesting to exchange note - I've rewritten many parts of it, adding a little here, taking away a little there. I've had to work to challenge my party, but its a pretty powerful foursome:

Dwarven Cleric of Asmodeus (Madness, Glory-Heroism) playing as a fanatic and leader of the group through bullying and devotion more than his Charisma of 5. Powerful as he is, he'd still be on the run and hiding in ditches if not for his young protege...

Tiefling Paladin of Asmodeus built as a straight up Paladin, merely transpose any 'good' abilities for 'evil' and vice versa. High charisma and serves as the group's face but was all but raised by the Dwarf and feels beholden to him - or would if not for...

Half-Elven Master Summoner, a seductive bon vivant who summons devils and fiendish creatures to serve her capricious whims. There was doubt that she would ever love anyone until she met our Tiefling anti-hero over whom she's become quite infatuated with - much to the dismay of...

Half-Elven Summoner, a brutish woman, half-elven and half-orc, half sister to the Master Summoner above and the one whom determined their course unquestioned before she met the Tiefling. She is all but devoid of humanity, and her closeness with her eidolon goes beyond intimate.

Its been a really great dynamic, the Cleric and the Summoner both classic alphas in their play while the Paladin and the Master Summoner have bonded in such a way that each has found the courage to stand up to their mentors from time to time. Role-play aside, I'm sure you can see how potent those race/class combinations might be if well-built. FWIW, in our games Summoners don't get the Summon Monster SLA and Master Summoners don't get an eidolon. Goes a long way towards balancing the classes.

EDIT: The Tiefling took a level of Oracle when they made their oaths to the Cardinal, choosing the Legalistic curse to go with the Lore mystery to reflect his education at the hands of the Dwarf. The Summoner eventually took a level of Dragoon and often fights astride her eidolon when the terrain favors it.

Lol isn’t it? Oh yeah you have some interesting player development there. Love it. I probably can’t exchange too many notes as I’m actively playing in the AP myself, otherwise I would have loved to!

Our game has our nefarious group of villains only just having reclaimed the Horn and busied themselves with all that entails. I’m being intentionally vague here with that to spare anyone any spoiler moments. But the party consists of:

Elven Cleric, Holy Vindicator of Asmodeus, (Fire, Devil - Evil) A severe and manipulative woman by all accounts with a penchant for uproariously funny quips she doesn’t intend (at least to us as players). She is nothing short of a zealot in her dedication to the Church of Asmodeus. And may or may not (depending upon which day and who is discussing it with her) have cut herself a deal for a stay of execution in exchange for damning information about certain other PCs guilt/crimes at the outset of the AP. Her claim to fame aside from the kool-aide commentary was during the party’s flight from Brandescar she whilst - employing a captured shortbow she wasn’t proficient with - immediately crit a tower guard and ended him with a neck shot, to which she offered, “That was just a warning shot!”

Half-orc Wild Shape (Lion Shaman) Druid/Cleric of Ayrzul, (Earth – Metal, Destruction – Rage, Strength – Ferocity) A massive “man” completely unconcerned with social interactions beyond “Can we kill this now?” sorts of engagements. It was heinous banditry and murder that landed him in chains. The only member of the group that truly holds little to no real invested companionship for his Knot-mates whom he considers weaklings by orcish standards (to the exclusion of the Ninja who’s efficiency at murder at least bears his grudging respect), he was pressed into indentured servitude to the Church when he refused the offered contract, was summarily pounded into unconsciousness by Tiadora, and his life spared only at the behest of his now companions who admired his combat resilience during their escape. He considers himself to owe them some convoluted life debt, and he’ll crack skulls for the Asmodeans until he manages to repay it. Then he plans to plot his escape from the pact.

Human Anti-paladin of Asmodeus, The only real obvious shock trooper in the bunch. He has some sort of weird, hedonistic lust-affair with the party Witch and the Asmodean Cleric that no one else in the Knot can seem to understand. Not that the women reciprocate, unless it’s to manipulate him to their collective whims with a dangling, romantic promise they never intend to fulfill. He was duped into Fall by that same Witch and used in an arson attempt upon a Mitran Cathedral that didn’t succeed as planned. The bulk of the group believes and justifies his obsession as being elf-struck.

Aasimar Wizard/Sorceror, Part-time Pyromaniac, full-time ladies man in his own mind. Except it is somewhat hard to argue with his many conquests. Sadly, most of his play-things don’t survive the trysts. The face of the party largely because he can’t seem to let anyone else get a word in edge-wise. When he’s not extolling his many virtues and insights, as seen by himself, he is jealously cloistered away with his books, or his concubines. One of which is the party cohort. He’s a schemer and over-planner and almost compulsive OCD micro-manager. His strategic plan A’s might actually bear fruit, if only the Anti-paladin and Druid’s thirst for glorious blood-letting didn’t continually shatter his complex efforts at puppet-mastery brand evil.

Sylph Witch, In a party where Divine magic is so prevalent you wouldn’t expect her to be the most active healer in the Knot. But she is. She abhors placing herself in harm’s way, all too happy to let her heavy armor wearing “Lovelies” handle the rough stuff while she hangs back tossing Hexes and Cackling away to maximize the brutes’ efforts at slaughter. Her ultimate goal is to establish and keystone a Coven where she can freely work her foul magics to her little black heart’s content. She has a very particular and intense hatred for the Mitran theocracy, for reasons she refuses to indulge. Likely it has something to do with stakes and firestarters. Quick to answer threats, real or imagined, with the might of her boy-toy “love interest” she thirsts insatiably for power in all its many forms.

Drow Elven Ninja, A master of both poisons and the bow, she’s the haunt in the night when direct frontal assault isn’t possible or recommended. Every party needs its scout, reconnaissance, and assassin and this quiet woman plays the part with frightening efficiency. She has no particular qualms about why’s or whatfors – only murder for hire and profit. She was a remorseless slave trader before she was brought low. And while she was only posing as a soldier to complete an assassination they tacked Desertion onto her list of many sins. Not that she needed it.

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