101 Inn names


Homebrew and House Rules

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164. The trap door, A tavern which resides directly over a dungeon... but noone gets the reference

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165. Dorsia. A high-class establishment, nearly impossible to get in unless you know the owner. Apparently, the sea urchin ceviche is outrageous.

Interesting side effect: if the maitre d' refuses your reservation, you get rage powers as a Barbarian.

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Dustyboy wrote:
164. The trap door, A tavern which resides directly over a dungeon... but noone gets the reference

Don't you open that trap door!

You're a fool if you dare!
Stay away from that trap door!
'Cause there's something down there...


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3 generated with the GMG:

166. The King's Cat Tavern Despite the name this is a simple establishment however it only opens on public holidays honoring old King Azhivan's honored lion. Fortunately the mad monarch named hundreds of these during his brief reign. Nevrik Spigg and his wife Hegla run the establishment with a few barmaids besides; Hegla is known throughout the town for her soups and her oxtail is a favorite. Besides that and watery grog patrons come to the King's Cat for the bard Velathynn and his lute.

167. The Sign of the Fearsome Storm Clouds This place created and operated by Gimlek Gandynagg the dour Halfling sorcerer is as strange as it is loved. Built into the side of a hill the inn has surprisingly low ceilings; adequate for Gimlek but most of his patrons keep a wary eye up. According to local rumor the sorcerer angered an elemental of some power and created the place with certain design aesthetics to ward the creature off but Master Gandynagg has always flatly stated he wanted to get in out of the weather which is notoriously stormy in these parts. Still the wine cellar he keeps is extensive and rich so most of his customers ignore his eccentricities. Food includes simple peasant fare like fried cow heel with a mint jelly. The perk of the place however are the suites - customers wishing to spend a night have eight tunnels leading into the hill in various places; each one is a suite with sleeping accommodations for 2, a dressing room, a parlor and separate lavatory and bathing room.

168. The Yellow Pipe Alehouse legend has it that the wisened half-elf sage Zitifur the Pale sat every day under the eaves of gnarled old oak deep in thought and smoked his pipe. One day a young woman from the town asked him what he was doing; he was so startled by the question he screamed twice before vanishing in a puff of smoke, leaving behind nothing but his smoldering yellow calumet. The woman, you see, was a powerful witch and she'd taken a shine to both the tree and old Zitifur. He was a mad old codger and had rebuked her on several occasions saying that she could have either the tree or him but not both. On the day in question she arrived holding a heavy length of rope in her hands.

Mylda Oakbinder settled on the tree.

This is the story folks tell at the hearth of the Yellow Pipe Alehouse. The celebrated pub and inn winds around the great living trunk of the very tree in the story though the proprietors take care not to injure the arbor. There is an extremely old length of rope bound around the tree that is similarly unmolested. Aside from these points the Yellow Pipe is just a fine neighborhood inn.

The taproom is roughly circular with a bar, scattered tables and a robust hearth on the far wall. A grand staircase leads up into the tall second story which is woven across the boughs of the oak. Patrons are served fine but hearty ales, beers and lagers in the taproom paired with favorites like the fried sausages and marrow dumplings in gravy. The rooms upstairs are quaint common quarters sleeping between 4 - 10 in each. The one complementary service of the house is that any gear left in the common room will be stitched, sewn, tinkered or otherwise repaired by morning. Though these repairs are often whimsical in appearance they are appreciated by the road-weary guests brought in by the frequent caravans and adventuring parties alike.

GM's note:
A group of faeries have had Mylda and her mortal lover, Zitifur the Pale trussed up inside the tree for nearly a century. They operate in collusion with the inn; they mend the gear by night but their repairs bear faerie marks that may have strange consequences later (spread good or bad luck; guide travelers to buried treasure; cause inexplicable dancing or flatulence, etc). They bound up the lovers in the first place because it was gross and its gone on so long even they don't remember why. At the GM's discretion the tree may send sleepers weird dreams that represent the partners within attempting to contact someone to free them.


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169: The Crossroads Inn Set at a prominent crossroads in the kingdom, every time the party stops there it is being run by a different group of people.


170: Fisherman's Folly This largish inn in a coastal town shows a sign hanging out front that depicts a fisherman in a rowboat about to be swallowed by the huge fish he is catching. In the common room, mounted to the wall behind the bar, is an unbelievably huge fish, comparable to the one pictured on the sign out front. However, no one knows who caught it. Anyone asked denies any knowledge of the original fisherman, and the innkeeper says repeatedly when asked, "It was here when I bought the place, and the last owner told me the same thing."


171: The WyverInn-
The center supporting pillar of the large tavern is in the shape of a wyvern with is large wings creating the supporting eves of the vaulted ceiling.


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172. The Skullbreaker Tavern: Named for the heavy, highly intoxicating dark ale that is brewed here, the Skullbreaker is run by a family of dwarves. Each member of the family spends 20 years of their life adventuring before coming back with tales and to take part in the family business. There are never less than a dozen family members on staff at any one time, and since most members of the staff are retired adventurers, trouble tends to be put down quickly.


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173. Vindegard Hall This austere brick lodgehouse is the chief meeting place of the Vindegard league; a men's league where business is strictly prohibited (and subsequently transacted frequently). It features oak-panneled rooms; private meeting chambers; magically treated glass so that light and sound are conducted in, but not out of the building. There are numerous amenites offered to members such as access to libraries, bathing facilities, free room and board as well as meals and fine libations. Membership fees are steep and women are not allowed. There is an expectation of tipping the help, the rare performers allowed in and other paid guests. Finally members may bring up to 3 guests with them to use the facilities however the member is liable for all activities of said guests and these guests may not stay onsite longer than 72 consecutive hours.

174. Leaves of Autumn Teahouse run by the herbalist witch Lady Autumn Moonbottle this quaint respite is meant for civil discourse and libations. The teahouse is contained within the first floor of Lady Autumn's rambling 3-story manse; a gothic victorian in one of the darker ends of town. There is a dining hall, parlor and veranda serviced by an enclosed winter kitchen; though there is access upstairs this is strictly prohibited. Lady Autumn maintains a quiescent and soothing atmosphere through magic and serves only tea, pastries and other modest fare suitable for sober consumption. A few times each month, coinciding with lunar cycles the teahouse is closed to a select few; at this time all doings inside the buildings are held at night and kept absolutely secret though rumors abound; everything from animal sacrifice to blood tea to worship of dark gods.

175. Moonstag's This is a chain of small taverns scattered across the land. They are non-alcoholic, serving only coffee, tea and other daytime libations as well as small foodstuffs. The sign hanging above each one has nothing to do with their name and features a merman silhouetted against a lunar halo. Inside the bartenders or "Bar-Misters" brew up the orders of the patrons inside of massive, clockwork machines fueled by magic. These generate intense heat and steam is frequent, hence the nickname of the workers. The seating area is made up of dozens of small tables and counters along the walls; the chairs here are eclectic and encourage long, restful sits. Patrons ues these coffe-houses to meet and discuss daytime business, read scrolls or speak on magical devices clipped to their ears while feeling important.


176. La muerte de la razón- A top shelf establishment that includes alcohols that are mixed with mild hallucinogenics. The owner is addicted and usually allows bound summons to run the bar.


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177 - 195
Inn Nomine Patris An inn run by a former adventuring paladin.
Inn Discretion Inn and Brothel, run by a married couple with an "open" marriage.
The Pig and Whistle A classic for those who have read the Dragon Lance books.
The Raging Bull Run by a retired adventurer. Renamed after a group of minotaurs tried to ransack it. The heads are mounted on the wall.
Easy 8 Brothel run by a wizard who has 8 bound succubi.
Days Inn Normal looking, but is secretly the HQ of group of vampire hunters.
The Double Tree An inn run by a druid with 2 Ent guardians in back.
Inn and Sweets A modest inn with an attached pastery shop.
The Hilton A rather large and nice kept inn. But the daughter of the inn keeper is an embarassment to the family as she works downtown at the brothel.
Inn Decisive Run by a retired military tactician.
The Horney Toad A brothel run by a Grippli.
The Busty Naga I just like the name
Boars Head Inn
The Sleeping Dragon
Roc's Nest A large inn built on the site of a fallen Roc.
The Gilded Dragon
Fairy Tail A brothel run by Nymph sorceress. She can shrink you so you can make it wth a pixie.
Treasured Chests A brothel run by a retired Pirate.
The Crow's Perch Named for the nearby tree that attracts a murder of crows.


Mark Hoover wrote:

173. Vindegard Hall

175. Moonstag's This is a chain of small taverns scattered across the land. They are non-alcoholic, serving only coffee, tea and other daytime libations as well as small foodstuffs. The sign hanging above each one has nothing to do with their name and features a merman silhouetted against a lunar halo.
"Bar-Misters" brew up the orders of the patrons inside of massive, clockwork machines fueled by magic. These generate intense heat and steam is frequent, hence the nickname of the workers. The seating area is made up of dozens of small tables and counters along the walls; the chairs here are eclectic and encourage long, restful sits. Patrons use these coffe-houses to meet and discuss daytime business, read scrolls or speak on magical devices clipped to their ears while feeling important.

While the large is tiny, it has as much caffeine and flavor as an actual large. Huge is served in a normal cup. Colossal is serves in a mug. Gargantuan is in a stein but it is still coffee. The lama's milk latte has a 5% per caster level chance of giving the drinker true visions of selected historical events.


196: The Unwelcome Bastard. Not a fine liquor establishment, but a venue of political foment and can occasionally suit those looking for mercenary hire. EIther named for an unwanted king with tenuous claim to the throne or a dwarf proprietor with a chip on his shoulder the Unwelcome Bastard is not for the fainthearted.

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