Reflavoring the O-Yoroi


Advice


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

I am playing a female half-elf paladin of the Eagle's Watch in our Wrath of the Righteous adventure path, and I really, really want to get the O-yoroi since it mechanically fits my character perfectly.

However, my paladin isn't at all Eastern and her current portrait doesn't match up at all. What's more, I just can't envision her in O-yoroi armor.

However, I am not at all above reflavoring the armor to something similar. I've even done it with past characters, turning kikko armor into the European equivalent (brigandine).

With O-yoroi though, I can't think of how I might change the flavor. Does anyone know of a real armor that is not mentioned in the game already and that is roughly equivalent to O-yoroi, but more closely resembles a suit of European armor?

Hoping to get a brainstorm of concepts.


Via Wikipedia articles on "o-yoroi" and "lamellar"Byzantine Armor


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Perfect! Thanks!

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Well, also, it's a fantasy setting.

Your design could be, well, fantastical.

Liberty's Edge

While the basic lamellar design of parts of the O-Yoroi armor are similar to the Byzantine, just remember that the O-Yoroi is the entire kit, not just the pieces, and it is almost equal parts style as it is functional design, unlike a suit of full plate or some such.

I think BBT has the right of it in this case, perhaps design a functionally similar, yet fantasy themed armor style that is also all encompassing.

Perhaps a particular style of leaf scale styled Elven combat armor that the elven knights of your game setting wear, which would kind of make sense with their connections to the natural world and their lower constitution and higher dexterity, they are more likely to wear armor that is more flowing, mobile and lightweight, providing it's protection in artistic layers of materials with a decorative flourish... just think of what the elven versions of the helm and masks would be like?... rather than bulky steel plate armor.

This way you can have the functionality and basic design style that you are looking for, but also have a cultural flare and vision that blends the armor into your game setting and concept.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Sometimes, we try too hard to equate something in a fantasy setting, to something in the real world.

It's understandable, but we need to allow ourselves some leeway, and accept that some things will simply not be equatable, at least, not wholly, and remain mostly fantastical.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
blackbloodtroll wrote:

Sometimes, we try too hard to equate something in a fantasy setting, to something in the real world.

It's understandable, but we need to allow ourselves some leeway, and accept that some things will simply not be equatable, at least, not wholly, and remain mostly fantastical.

Or just not use the completely fantasy stuff. Like the manga greatsword which looks like it should weigh 50 pounds. Or armor made out of lollypops.

Sarasmancer's suggestion is spot on. Re-flavoring game mechanics is good.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Friend of the Dork wrote:
blackbloodtroll wrote:

Sometimes, we try too hard to equate something in a fantasy setting, to something in the real world.

It's understandable, but we need to allow ourselves some leeway, and accept that some things will simply not be equatable, at least, not wholly, and remain mostly fantastical.

Or just not use the completely fantasy stuff. Like the manga greatsword which looks like it should weigh 50 pounds. Or armor made out of lollypops.

Sarasmancer's suggestion is spot on. Re-flavoring game mechanics is good.

No need to crap fire ants.

Both are valid suggestions, of ways Re-flavoring game mechanics.


Friend of the Dork wrote:
blackbloodtroll wrote:

Sometimes, we try too hard to equate something in a fantasy setting, to something in the real world.

It's understandable, but we need to allow ourselves some leeway, and accept that some things will simply not be equatable, at least, not wholly, and remain mostly fantastical.

Or just not use the completely fantasy stuff. Like the manga greatsword which looks like it should weigh 50 pounds. Or armor made out of lollypops

If the table lets it fly, then it's all good.


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

How would you describe an all-encompasing O-yoroi-like fantasy armor on a character sheet, BBT?


I'm not BBT, but no reason you can't call it 'full plate' or 'custom full plate'.


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

For some reason, calling it "full plate, but not" seems like a cheap cop out to me. Surely we can find something short and sweet.


Why not just use the literal translation: "Great Armor" or "Lord's Armor"?

Liberty's Edge

Elven War Armor if you want to "flavor" it.

Or just some sort of Field armor.

Personally, I would think of what you envision it to look/function like and then make a name based on that.


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
JoeOutside wrote:
Why not just use the literal translation: "Great Armor" or "Lord's Armor"?

I considered it, but I didn't much like the fit. Seemed a bit too generic I guess.


Just call it O-Yoroi on the character sheet to keep the audit side of things happy, and describe it as you needed to.

As long as you are happy that everyone is across the 'mechanics' of your armour you should be fine - just none of this 'it looks like its made of soft plush toys, but protects like steel' chicanery etc - it must be blatantly clear you are wearing heavy armour.


Ravingdork wrote:
JoeOutside wrote:
Why not just use the literal translation: "Great Armor" or "Lord's Armor"?
I considered it, but I didn't much like the fit. Seemed a bit too generic I guess.

Aren't all the armor names essentially generic?


Zhayne wrote:
Aren't all the armor names essentially generic?

Entirely.

I'm not sure why a mundane suit of armour needs some funky name.


"Embossed plate"? "Lacquered plate"? "Heavy brigandine"? It's a tough concept to convey pithily, I'll give you that.


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Sarcasmancer wrote:
"Embossed plate"? "Lacquered plate"? "Heavy brigandine"? It's a tough concept to convey pithily, I'll give you that.

Those aren't bad suggestions.

Shifty wrote:

Just call it O-Yoroi on the character sheet to keep the audit side of things happy, and describe it as you needed to.

Even when I change the flavor, I make sure I have the original name listed so as to avoid confusion.

For example, I might have "Falen's firebird (as fireball)" listed on a character's spell list. It conjures a flaming bird which flies to the area and detonates, but it's really just a fireball and things like Spell Perfection (fireball) affect it normally.

Or I might have something like "brigandine (as kikko armor)" listed on a character's equipment list.

Or I might have the "Attune Gem" feat listed in place of a wizard's Scribe Scroll feat and also have the following written under Special Abilities:

Gem Mage You are a rare and gifted arcanist skilled at attuning precious gemstones with your magic. You gain the Attune Gems feat as a bonus feat (which functions identically to the Scribe Scroll feat). Instead of placing your spells on paper, you imbed them in valuable gemstones for later use. Attuned gems work in every way like arcane spell scrolls (the cost of the gem is subsumed in the cost to make it attuned).


What was the name used for the Heavy Lorica Segmentata that was used by Cavalry?

Though even Lorica could be worked into it?

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Ravingdork wrote:
How would you describe an all-encompasing O-yoroi-like fantasy armor on a character sheet, BBT?

We have things like Hellknight Plate.

So, maybe "Dragon Armor", named after the Dragon empires, or go for "Azlanti Great Armor".

I would take region of origin in Golarion, and go from there.

Maybe "Numerian Riding Plate".

Find what fits your backstory, and feel.


Greatwood Plate? Iron Leaf Plate?


I'd simply call it Lamellar Plate, as it consists of both of those elements. Or come up with an elven name for Iron Forest Armour.
Or you could name it Laminar Plate, after it's cousin Laminar, the type of armour which the Lorica Segmentata and some of the other Japanese armours belong to.
Something different, Plated Mail, a persian armour type.

If I wanted to match the classic bushi helm iconography with a mechanic, I'd try and get the Steelskin trait,though the helm would probably shaped like a powerful beast or plant, like gryphon, dragon or treant.


Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Thank you all for the wonderful suggestions. Are there any others?

Does anyone know the answer to Azaelas Fayth's question?

Liberty's Edge

Lorica Squamata was the scale version of the Roman armor often warn by cavalry, standard bearers, musicians and the like. Not sure if that was what he was looking for.


I was thinking of a Late Byzantine Armour not one of the Loricas... Sorry...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

All I was saying, is that all the armor/weapons don't need real world equivalents for flavor.

The Dire Flail, Orc Double Axe and Battle Ladder, all have no real world equivalents.

That's fine.


There was a Threshing tool that was similar to the Dire flail though without the Mace Heads...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Azaelas Fayth wrote:
There was a Threshing tool that was similar to the Dire flail though without the Mace Heads...

Oh?

Do you have an idea what this tool is called, or do you have picture of it?


It is just a Type of threshing flail though thinking back it is mainly a Handle strapped to the back with two long lengths of chains used for threshing without harvesting. Apparently it was used for the wheat and oats that would be used exclusively for Livestock Feeding...

Really I guess it would be more of a Spiked Chain than a Dire Flail...

Community / Forums / Pathfinder / Pathfinder First Edition / Advice / Reflavoring the O-Yoroi All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.