Starting gear for PFS Wizard?


Advice

Dark Archive

This is my first time playing any kind of spell caster in PFS. I have no idea what gear I should be getting for him, especially when it comes to weapons, and armor. (should I even be using any armor?) I mean I'm going to need to do something when my spells run out, right?

Keep in mind only starting with 150 gold.


EVERY caster should have armor. Buy a Haramaki for 3gp for +1ac. It has no armor check pent so anyone can wear it.

Weapons? Cast a cantrip every round. Repeat. If you have a Str with positive bonuses, feel free to pick up a staff or dagger but you don't want anywhere melee so most times it'll only be there to look pretty.

Silver Crusade RPG Superstar 2014 Top 16

graystone wrote:

EVERY caster should have armor. Buy a Haramaki for 3gp for +1ac. It has no armor check pent so anyone can wear it.

Weapons? Cast a cantrip every round. Repeat. If you have a Str with positive bonuses, feel free to pick up a staff or dagger but you don't want anywhere melee so most times it'll only be there to look pretty.

Or to at least take an AOO or provide a flanking bonus.


Zahir ibn Mahmoud ibn Jothan wrote:
graystone wrote:

EVERY caster should have armor. Buy a Haramaki for 3gp for +1ac. It has no armor check pent so anyone can wear it.

Weapons? Cast a cantrip every round. Repeat. If you have a Str with positive bonuses, feel free to pick up a staff or dagger but you don't want anywhere melee so most times it'll only be there to look pretty.

Or to at least take an AOO or provide a flanking bonus.

An AOO is why I said "If you have a Str with positive bonuses" pick up a melee weapon. As far as flank, the wizard should be getting away from combat instead. Even with armor and an good dex, melee isn't their friend.

If for some reason wolfear WANTS to charge in with a weapon, I'd suggest a bonded object (weapon) to get the masterwork +1 to hit and the extra spell. Though it still ends up with him not spending any cash on a weapon. ;)

Dark Archive

graystone wrote:
Zahir ibn Mahmoud ibn Jothan wrote:
graystone wrote:

EVERY caster should have armor. Buy a Haramaki for 3gp for +1ac. It has no armor check pent so anyone can wear it.

Weapons? Cast a cantrip every round. Repeat. If you have a Str with positive bonuses, feel free to pick up a staff or dagger but you don't want anywhere melee so most times it'll only be there to look pretty.

Or to at least take an AOO or provide a flanking bonus.

An AOO is why I said "If you have a Str with positive bonuses" pick up a melee weapon. As far as flank, the wizard should be getting away from combat instead. Even with armor and an good dex, melee isn't their friend.

If for some reason wolfear WANTS to charge in with a weapon, I'd suggest a bonded object (weapon) to get the masterwork +1 to hit and the extra spell. Though it still ends up with him not spending any cash on a weapon. ;)

I'm good with hanging out in the back and messing stuff up as much as possible for the bad guys.


So for 3 gold you have a staff and some armor! Time to buy adventuring gear with the other 147gp!


You can buy access to spells for 5g, and inscribe them for another 10g. If you have max ranks in spellcraft, you auto succeed the check to learn them by taking 10.

Add spells to your book with your extra change.


I favor a light crossbow & 50 bolts (35G & 5G) for starting magic blasters, for the range (at level 1 the damage cantrips have a 25' range, ) and the damage (1d6/1d8 versus 1d3 for cantrips). You can sell it off when you get some levels but at the beginning of a blaster's career, when spells are scarce and magic item non-existent, the light crossbow should see considerable use. If not a blaster wizard it isn't as essential but is still a good idea.


Well the minus for that crossbow is you are hitting normal AC while cantrips hit touch ac. That d6/d8 is MUCH less impressive when it misses much more often. Not to say you couldn't have one for long range, but spells should be your go to thing. If I'm a crossbowman, why did I pick wizard?

Silver Crusade

Does PFS use the expanded components rules? Flask of acid or the elemental Ice vial thingee would be good if you can use those rules in PFS.


"Everything in this book is legal for play with the following exceptions: a pseudodragon is not legal for purchase unless you're a wizard with the Improved Familiar feat, elephants are never legal for play, and armored kilts are not legal." So it's a thumbs up for power components.

I have a winter witch right now doing d3+1 piercing damage and 1d4+1 cold from a Ray of Frost. If you focus on cantrip buffs, you can end up with around a +15 damage on a cantrip.

Scarab Sages

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I feel that EVERYONE, no matter whom, ought to have a melee weapon and a ranged weapon, just in case. If you're a Wizard of a race that doesn't get bonus weapon proficiencies (i.e. not an Elf, Dwarf, Tengu, etc.), that would probably mean either a club or quarterstaff (since ordinary versions of either are both free, and even if what you really want is a dagger, why not just wait to purchase a masterwork version at the end of your first or second adventure and save yourself 1 gp in the long run?), and either a light or heavy crossbow (your choice as to which, really), as well as 10 or 20 bolts. Unless you've taken either Eschew Materials or False Focus, you also need a spell component pouch (5 gold, 2 lbs.).

Beyond that, I recommend for all but the strongest characters a masterwork backpack, which costs 50 gold, but treats your Strength score as 1 point higher for purposes of carrying capacity - it will serve you in good stead until that distant day you buy yourself a handy haversack (or possibly a bag of holding, though that's a much less likely option for wizardly sorts). If you don't want to spend the 50 gold, you should still get a regular backpack (2 gold).

I second alchemical power components if you have the Adventurer's Armory - depending on your preference/opposition schools if any, get a flask of acid or liquid ice and use it in its capacity as a focus rather than material component for a lasting +1 to your acid splash or ray of frost damage. On the other hand, if you choose to take the False Focus feat, as mentioned above, you should go all-out and make one that's worth 100 gold - I have a Razmiran Priest Sorcerer with such a treasure, and he can use it to instantly mock-up nearly any power component described.

I also recommend general adventuring equipment - if you have Ultimate Equipment, that includes a Grooming Kit (1 gold, 2 lbs., and includes soap, which has potential uses beyond hygiene), a Mess Kit (2 silver, 1 lb.), flint and steel (1 gold), trail rations (5 silver each, 1 lb. for medium-sized characters, I'd keep 1 or 2 days' worth on hand), a bedroll and/or blanket (the former costs less by itself, the latter weighs less) and maybe things like a ball of twine, chalk, candles and a candlestick, a mirror, a magnet, earplugs, smoked goggles, a scroll case, and even a bag of marbles (I witnessed long ago the remarkable utility of a simple, 1-silver bag of marbles as a weapon against trundling sorts like clerics, warriors, and zombies). As the party brains, it might behoove you to carry writing equipment around: an inkpen (1 silver) or an entire Scrivener's Kit (2 gold, 1 lb.), a 1-oz. vial of black ink (8 gold), and however many sheets of paper (4 silver), parchment (2 silver), or rice paper (5 copper) you care to keep on hand and can afford (between 2 and 6 sheets is good).

Finally, if you happen to have 55 gold left over after everything else and have invested in a Craft skill (an especially good idea for a Wizard), why not pick up a set of Masterwork Artisan's Tools? I just DM'ed a game that was one character's first adventure, and because he'd started with one, he managed to get a '30' on his first Day Job roll, earning him an extra 75 gold right out of the gate. Also, bear in mind that Craft, Perform, and Profession skills can do more for you than just your Day Job. My flagship character, a Witch, is a sculptor. In his first adventure, his faction mission (back when that was a thing) involved him stealing the figurehead off a ship. While it wound up being unnecessary to do this, our initial plan was for me to sculpt a replica so nobody would notice the original was missing.


Haramaki!(Armor), Crossbow!(Ranged), Dagger(Melee), and rope(Towel)! Fantastic, for a small amount your already prepped and ready to adventure with some spare change!

Think about improvements later. I love getting armor with armor spikes myself, and some special materials can be pretty cheap and come in handy even if your not using them. There are also a lot of useful materials such as Alchemical Grease and Bombs that can be really useful for mundane problem solving. Can't tell you the number of lives I've saved with a folding ladder or rope! Masterwork tools can be great for flavor, and a +2 doesn't hurt.

Crossbow has quiet a bit over ray attacks. Rays hit touch, but sometimes a foe actually has a touch about the same as their regular AC, and you can use the crossbow for targets at a longer range and for the grappling arrow! Its about utility and being prepared, and for pennies that's not so bad.


graystone wrote:
Well the minus for that crossbow is you are hitting normal AC while cantrips hit touch ac. That d6/d8 is MUCH less impressive when it misses much more often. Not to say you couldn't have one for long range, but spells should be your go to thing. If I'm a crossbowman, why did I pick wizard?

touch AC versus regular AC isn't a big difference at starting levels, a common circumstance is AC 10 touch versus AC 14 normal. once normal ACs start reaching for the 20s the spread between touch AC and normal AC widens to the point where using the crossbow becomes a bad idea, but at starting levels the crossbow's increased damage outweighs the lower hit chance. At AC 14 (10 touch) with +1 to hit the cantrip hits for an average of 2 damage on a 9+ while the crossbow hits for an average of 4.5 damage on a 13+, advantage crossbow. Once a wizard has a few levels and the opponents being faced have higher ACs the crossbow becomes a poor choice, but for the first few levels the crossbow is great (although I have learned to keep a crossbow handy until I get a wand or a few scrolls with decent range, there are few feelings worse than being sniped at and not being able to respond because your only memorized spells have a range of close).


cnetarian wrote:
graystone wrote:
Well the minus for that crossbow is you are hitting normal AC while cantrips hit touch ac. That d6/d8 is MUCH less impressive when it misses much more often. Not to say you couldn't have one for long range, but spells should be your go to thing. If I'm a crossbowman, why did I pick wizard?
touch AC versus regular AC isn't a big difference at starting levels, a common circumstance is AC 10 touch versus AC 14 normal. once normal ACs start reaching for the 20s the spread between touch AC and normal AC widens to the point where using the crossbow becomes a bad idea, but at starting levels the crossbow's increased damage outweighs the lower hit chance. At AC 14 (10 touch) with +1 to hit the cantrip hits for an average of 2 damage on a 9+ while the crossbow hits for an average of 4.5 damage on a 13+, advantage crossbow. Once a wizard has a few levels and the opponents being faced have higher ACs the crossbow becomes a poor choice, but for the first few levels the crossbow is great (although I have learned to keep a crossbow handy until I get a wand or a few scrolls with decent range, there are few feelings worse than being sniped at and not being able to respond because your only memorized spells have a range of close).

I find a few reasons to go cantrip vs crossbow.

#1 I find that +4 to hit HUGE. The extra 20% for me more than makes up for the lower average damage as you hit more. Better to deal 2 damage this round than 5 points next.

#2 It's much easier to add damage to the cantrip. With a little effort the crossbow overtakes the crossbow in damage. For a single feat you can add +2 damage to your ray of frost and ignore components up to 100gp (though you do have to spend 100gp. You've got plenty of money though.)

#3 the light crossbow takes up your move action every round.

#4 My wizards tend to be weak. 5 extra pounds is a tough sell. I like adventuring gear more.

#5 Casting spells every round just feels more like... you know a wizard! 'I pull out a crossbow and fire it' sounds more like a martial character. Also the +4 to hit just makes me feel more useful. A hit with less damage feels much better than a miss with larger damage.

There ARE reasons to have a crossbow for some.
#1 Range: If you find you run into a lot of foes outside of close range (@30'), snag a crossbow.

#2 Items: Good chance you'll run into a magic/special crossbow or bolt. If you find one, pick it up.

#3 Disguise: Sometimes you don't want to look like a caster...


graystone wrote:
Well the minus for that crossbow is you are hitting normal AC while cantrips hit touch ac. That d6/d8 is MUCH less impressive when it misses much more often. Not to say you couldn't have one for long range, but spells should be your go to thing. If I'm a crossbowman, why did I pick wizard?

If you've got a good dex score the difference between you and a martial class is very slight for the first 2 levels, even without the feats. If you plan on getting pbs and precise, and you can get them at first level, you're golden.

A wizard has to struggle through the first 4 levels for ways to conserve spells, and the crossbow is an excellent way to do so. If you don't have dex however go cantrip, you will need the edge on accuracy

Shadow Lodge

Buy a cheap pack animal. Stand behind it.

+4 soft-cover AC, and breaks charge-lanes.

Liberty's Edge

Remy Balster wrote:

You can buy access to spells for 5g, and inscribe them for another 10g. If you have max ranks in spellcraft, you auto succeed the check to learn them by taking 10.

Add spells to your book with your extra change.

How does one buy access to spells for 5gp?


I actually recommend a couple scrolls of one of your spells in your spellbook. I had started up a conjuration wizard with opposed schools of necromancy and enchantment, but included one enchantment spell in my book. Sleep. Then I bought two scrolls of sleep for 25 gold apiece. Note that I could cast them without having sleep prepared for the day at all. That gets you around some of your limited spell slots per day, and any opposition school restrictions you'd otherwise have.

Other spells you might want scrolled at first level are Mage Armor, Grease (if only so you don't have to carry sticks of butter everywhere), Color Spray, Endure Elements, and Comprehend Languages. Naturally this depends on what type of wizard you're playing and what spells you've learned.

Liberty's Edge

Kalvit wrote:

I actually recommend a couple scrolls of one of your spells in your spellbook. I had started up a conjuration wizard with opposed schools of necromancy and enchantment, but included one enchantment spell in my book. Sleep. Then I bought two scrolls of sleep for 25 gold apiece. Note that I could cast them without having sleep prepared for the day at all. That gets you around some of your limited spell slots per day, and any opposition school restrictions you'd otherwise have.

Other spells you might want scrolled at first level are Mage Armor, Grease (if only so you don't have to carry sticks of butter everywhere), Color Spray, Endure Elements, and Comprehend Languages. Naturally this depends on what type of wizard you're playing and what spells you've learned.

Okay and is there a way to add spells to your spell book besides leveling or buying scrolls and using them to copy?

Dark Archive

If you're lucky you can copy spells from other wizard's spellbooks into you're own. The easiest way to do this is coordinate with another wizard in the party, but since this is for PFS you have two things to worry about. A) You are not assured to have another wizard hanging around and B) You are not assured the downtime to do this. This can also be done if you happen to come across a filled spellbook somehow, such as finding one in a library or defeating an enemy wizard and taking his spellbook, though, again, I am not sure PF society has any scenarios where such things occur.

As for gear, I echo the sentiments of the above posters, though I will say that before buying the armor everybody's been mentioning that you should check it's legality in PFS. I remember reading somewhere that the Haramaki was not PFS legal, though it was an old thread and the information may have been inaccurate or changed since the time it was written, so don't take my word for it and look up the legality yourself.

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