What are YOUR houserules?


Homebrew and House Rules

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TriOmegaZero wrote:
On a natural 20, the first damage die is maximized. If the confirmation roll is a natural 20, the second damage die is maximized.

We use this at our table and I loved it... until I got one-shotted by that power attacking x3 scythe wielding Golem living in the Shadow Clock in the Rise of the Runelords adventure path.

Started at full health...ended up dead before I got to swing my weapon.

-MD


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I've always hated trap finding/removal in 3.5/PF; reason being is that it centers around the rogue repetitively rolling a die while everyone else zones out or refills their drinks. Imagine if combat was settled the same way; "OK, everyone sit back while the fighter rolls a D20 to determine whether you win or lose this fight." 4th ed's solution was a little better, but did not fit in with the more "organic" mechanics of PF at all. I came up with this back in 3.5 (still tuning it for PF). It keeps the rogue as the "point man" for overcoming trap challenges, but it also really engages the rest of the group; allowing them to contribute their abilities to help resolve the challenge.

Kinda lengthy...

Show:

Rogues have an improved trap detection ability. The "disable device" skill, however, is actually more of a "knowledge" skill unique to rogues. Using this skill, the rogue can identify different means of overcoming or getting around the trap. At this point, the rest of the party can assist the rogue in various skills, challenges, spells, and tools necessary to overcome or avoid the trap. In a sense, traps are now challenges for the entire group, with the rogue acting as the point person throughout the challenge:

Alternate Traps Mechanic

Traps have two basic components, each of which has a separate search DC and disable DC; the trigger and effect. A trap’s trigger is the mechanism that defines the condition for what sets the trap off. A trap’s effect is what happens when it gets triggered. For example, a trap is set up in a hallway, so that when a tripwire is stretched or snapped, a series of loaded crossbows are set to launch a volley of bolts into the area. The tripwire would be the trigger, and the crossbows would be the effect. Note that a trap might have multiple triggers and/or effects. The effect of one trap can also be the trigger for another trap.

As a standard action, a rogue (and only a rogue) can use their search skill to detect traps within 15’ plus 5’ for every three levels of rogue, to a maximum range of 40’. A 10th level rogue could attempt to detect traps within 30’. Note that a rogue must be able to see whatever area they are searching. The rogue must roll equal to or better than either the trap’s trigger or effect search DC to identify it exists.

Search Roll:Result
Passed: The rogue senses a trap
Passed by 5: The general location of the trap is identified (within d4 x 5’)
Passed by 15: The exact location of the trap is identified

Once a rogue identifies that either a trap trigger or effect (or both on a good enough roll) exists, they may attempt a disable device roll to gather information on the trap. This requires a full-round action. Note that if both the trigger and effect are discovered in a search, they should be rolled separately in the disable check.

Disable Roll: Result
Failed by 15 or more: The trap is accidentally triggered
Passed: The location and type of the trap is identified
Passed by 5: Identified the mechanics of the trap
Passed by 10: Identified a means of bypassing the trap
Passed by 15: +5 to all skill rolls required to overcome the trap.

On a failed search or disable roll, a rogue may re-try, but in order to do so they must move five feet closer towards the trap. In some cases, the location of the trap will be unknown; in which case the character must still move five feet, but the ensuing roll will automatically fail, if they moved in the wrong direction.

Example: Ripley’s Roughneck Rangers is advancing down a dark, dungeon corridor. Unbeknownst to the group, a pressure plate halfway down the hall is set to trigger off a descending ceiling trap when stepped on. Carl Cutthroat, the group’s rogue, is on the lookout for anything suspicious. (Rolls a 22 on a search, which is enough to beat the 20 DC of the trap’s effect, but not the 25 DC for the well-hidden pressure plate) Carl senses that something is not quite right with this corridor. Motioning for the party to halt, he scrutinizes the area more carefully. (Rolls a 21 for disable device. The cave-in’s disable device DC is 25.) At this point, Carl senses that a the hallway is trapped, but can’t quite determine the location or type of the trap. He moves in a little closer to investigate, and attempts another disable device check. Fortunately for Carl, he is still about 15 feet away from the pressure plate, so he does not set it off. (Rolls a 32 for disable device). This time, Carl notices the ceiling appears to be webbed with a symmetrical design of minute cracks. A brown stain on the ceiling combined with some bone fragments in the corners make Carl realize that the ceiling is probably rigged to descend under the right circumstances. Now, if he could only figure how it is triggered…

Another example: Gloria Glitterdust moves stealthily into the bandit king’s burial chamber. Before moving through the threshold, she pauses to take a quick look around. (Rolls a 31 on a search check, which is enough to locate both the DC 25 trigger and DC 20 effect.) Something about the area ahead of her makes the hair stand up on her arms. Her attention is drawn to the massive stone statues lining the tomb walls. Something about the way they are positioned…

Gloria scrutinizes the floor ahead. (She rolls a 28 for disable device; the tripwire has a DC 25) She can’t quite make out what it is, but the lack of any footprints at all in a band of dust that spans the width of the room alerts her that perhaps one or more tripwires are strung across the room in that area. Looking at the statues (rolling a 28 for disable device, beating the statues 20 DC) she notices that they do not seem to be anchored to the floor. This is surprising, because they also appear to be rather top-heavy; which makes her wonder why they have not already fallen over…

At this point, Gloria could move in to examine the room a little more closely. If she makes a better disable check, she can potentially determine the locations of three tripwires placed at varying heights, requiring a DC 15 balance check to negotiate without triggering. She could also investigate the statues more closely.

Example traps:

CR 10:

Delayed Blast Fireball (resets in 5 rounds)

Trigger: "detect thoughts" spell is active, search DC 31, disable DC 31
Some possible trigger bypasses: mind blank, dispel magic
Effect: Fireball, search DC 15, disable 20
Some possible effect bypasses: Need to shield from around 70 hp fire dmg, remote discharge
Bad stuff: 20d6 fireball, DC 22 reflex for 1/2

CR 7:

Trapped Lock with Insanity Mist

Trigger: Spring in the lock; search 25, disable 20
Some possible trigger bypasses: Add +5 to DC to pick lock
Effect: Mechanism squirts poison gas; search 25, disable 25
Some possible effect bypasses: Extreme cold to gum up the misting mechanism
Bad stuff: DC 15 Fort save: 1d4 wis/2d6 wis, 10x10 area.

Trapped Lock with Poison Mist

Trigger: Spring in the lock; search 25, disable 20
Some possible trigger bypasses: Add +5 to DC to pick lock
Effect: Mechanism squirts poison gas; search 25, disable 25
Some possible effect bypasses: Extreme cold
Bad stuff: DC 15 Fort save: 1d4 con/2d6 con, 10x10 area.

Magic Spell Trap: (Tentacles, chain lightning, summon monster VI)

Trigger: proximity; search 31 or detect magic, disable 31
Some possible trigger bypasses: silence spell, dispel magic, move silently (DC 22)
Effect: spell; search 25, disable 25
Some possible effect bypasses: Move around any telltale marks (e.g. scorch blasts), dispel magic, resistance-type magic (depending on spell)
Bad stuff: effects of spell (DC of 6th level spell is 19)

CR 6:

Flame strike trap (auto reset)

Trigger: proximity, search DC 35, disable DC 35, detect magic
Some possible trigger bypasses: DC 20 balance check to skirt around area, teleport past.
Effect: Flame strike. Search DC 25, disable 25
Some possible effect bypasses: dispel magic, resistance spells
Bad stuff: 9d6 fire damage, DC 17 reflex for ½

Compacting Hall (resets in 5 rounds)

Trigger: pressure plate, search DC 25, disable DC 25
Some possible trigger bypasses: DC 20 jump to clear the plate, don’t touch plate, levitate, fly
Effect: Ceiling and walls close in, search DC 25, disable DC 25
Some possible effect bypasses: Brace walls with steel bars or stone, three consecutive DC 25 strength checks.
Bad stuff: Compaction in two rounds for 12d6 damage.

Collapsing ceiling

Trigger: Opening a door, search DC 30, disable DC 25
Some possible trigger bypasses: Don’t open door, knock spell
Effect: Ceiling collapses, search DC 20, disable DC 25
Some possible effect bypasses: Web spell on ceiling, wall of force, wall of stone, ice.
Bad stuff: 10d6 damage from falling ceiling (DC 17 reflex save for ½).

CR 5:

Spiked Pit Trap

Trigger: Location trigger, manual reset. Search DC 21, Disable DC 20
Some possible trigger bypasses: DC 20 balance check around pit, 10’ jump
Effect: Spiked pit; search DC 35, Disable DC 35
Some possible effect bypasses: feather fall, climb down
Bad stuff: 40 foot fall (4d6), 1d4 spikes per target; att +10 for 1-4+5. DC 25 reflex save avoids falling in.

CR 4:

Ranged ballista (resets in 1 round)

Trigger: Movement within 100 feet, search DC 35, disable DC 25
Some possible trigger bypasses: Stay out of range, invisibility
Effect: ballista, search DC 23, disable DC 25
Some possible effect bypasses: Ranged attack on firing gears; AC 30, hardness 5, 10 hp (if fail by 10 or more, triggers)
Bad stuff: Attack +20, dmg: 3d8


critical spit wrote:

I've always hated trap finding/removal in 3.5/PF; reason being is that it centers around the rogue repetitively rolling a die while everyone else zones out or refills their drinks. Imagine if combat was settled the same way; "OK, everyone sit back while the fighter rolls a D20 to determine whether you win or lose this fight." 4th ed's solution was a little better, but did not fit in with the more "organic" mechanics of PF at all. I came up with this back in 3.5 (still tuning it for PF). It keeps the rogue as the "point man" for overcoming trap challenges, but it also really engages the rest of the group; allowing them to contribute their abilities to help resolve the challenge.

Kinda lengthy...

** spoiler omitted **...

Interesting.

I still remember the days when the rogue found and tried to disable a trap, the rest of the party stood WAY BACK in case he screws up and set it off.

Grand Lodge

Dot

Dark Archive

Abyssal Lord wrote:
critical spit wrote:

I've always hated trap finding/removal in 3.5/PF; reason being is that it centers around the rogue repetitively rolling a die while everyone else zones out or refills their drinks. Imagine if combat was settled the same way; "OK, everyone sit back while the fighter rolls a D20 to determine whether you win or lose this fight." 4th ed's solution was a little better, but did not fit in with the more "organic" mechanics of PF at all. I came up with this back in 3.5 (still tuning it for PF). It keeps the rogue as the "point man" for overcoming trap challenges, but it also really engages the rest of the group; allowing them to contribute their abilities to help resolve the challenge.

Kinda lengthy...

** spoiler omitted **...

Interesting.

I still remember the days when the rogue found and tried to disable a trap, the rest of the party stood WAY BACK in case he screws up and set it off.

You mean that thing parties still do to this day because rogues are inept at everything?


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Speaking of traps...

For higher level dungeons, I will sometimes trap a trap. As in, the disarm components have a trap attached to them... and that trap, in turn, may have a trap set off by attempting to disarm it. Sometimes, there's even more than one trap attached to each trap. And setting off the main trap also sets off all of the auxiliary traps.

This can get ridiculous when someone doesn't even bother to check for traps. Or pay attention to the sign that says, "Door of Execution."

And if I want to really mess with a rogue's head, sometimes the traps they discover are already deactivated; their disable roll reactivates the trap.

Silver Crusade

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I put into practice an initiative system, that my players were at first skeptical about, but later liked after using it for a few sessions. Initiative was rolled with a d20 still, but initiative modifiers subtracted from that roll. Results of 0 or less indicated that that party member or monster got a surprise action. Then the count began 1, 2, 3, ... When each person's initiative came up, I took their declaration of intent, and told them how long their declared action would take to reach its resolution. That is when that action would resolve, and their next action could be declared. I set values to each type of action, that was the initiative modifying cost of that action, and had the chart laid openly on the table, so no changes could be made mid combat. This initiative system opened up combat chases, people evading by moving out of area targeted AoEs. Declared movements causing two individuals to run into each other. (I gave party members a reflex save to move in a coordinated fashion past one another.) I also began seeing players coordinate their attacks/actions to help one another. I also had to alter duration of spells into initiative factors as well, especially combat buffs, damage over time spells etc...I had each round equal to 10 initiative count, thus a two round duration spell would last 20 initiative count. Issues like attacks of opportunity, guarded actions, held actions, and the like brought up some debate, but we worked our way through them. I also allowed players to use feats like improved initiative to buy off some initiative costs, and hasten the resolution of their declaration. Haste also effected the initiative costs of certain actions, etc...


The ones I am currently using:
•At every level, every character gains +1 skill point, which may be spent on a Craft, Profession, or Knowledge skill of the player's choice.
Detect Evil and the other three spells only Detect an alignment if the source is magical (a spell or item), or if the creature is an Outsider or Undead. I wasn't happy with the party's Inquisitor spending every social scene mapping out every NPC's alignment and making judgments based off that.
•Players may not choose to play a Human. This is as much a setting rule as a house rule (humans died out many years ago). Half-orcs, half-elves, etc. are still valid. I did this to encourage a bit of creativity in my players, who have tended to be mono-human parties in the past.

Liberty's Edge

I have a house rule which is no house rules. Even though the rules can be too much they are pretty much perfected. At the same time I have moments of rules hate because of all the work it takes to run it.


Strength checks can be made with the players Ability Score, and assisting a player in a strength check adds in the relevant ability modifier. (Example: 17 strength fighter and a 16 strength fighter: the 17 strength fighter attempts the strength check and the 16 str fighter assists by adding 3 from the ability modifier bringing the total up to 20) - Choosing to do this is considered taking that score on the die roll, just as one would take 10 on a check.
(Reasoning: it never did make sense to me that one could fail to break down a door by simply being 'not strong enough' and yet manage to do it 6 seconds later. Also if a wizard with 8 strength in the party assists, how much are they actually contributing?)

Triple Crit: If the first attack is a nat 20, and the confirmation is a nat 20, then roll a third time to see if it is an instant kill.

Diplomacy and Bluff checks can be used in combat to deter enemy aggro, and Intimidate checks can be used to gain enemy aggro.

Leveling up + health: If you roll less than half on your HD then assume half OR health is locked in at your max die - 2 (Classes that have d10 would give 8 hp, and classes with d8 would give 6hp per level, no rolling)


Whirlwind Attack's requirements are now: Bab +4, Great Cleave


Eldrad wrote:
I have a house rule which is no house rules. Even though the rules can be too much they are pretty much perfected. At the same time I have moments of rules hate because of all the work it takes to run it.

It's ironic because I am one of those GMs who cannot leave the system alone; no system is good enough as is. I always screw with the rules, at least in theory, and day dream about launching the perfect campaign. Lol.

But, it is so much work to get to the point where I am happy with the rules, that recently I've been looking at it the opposite way; use the CRB only. It is a very tempting prospect, to only flip through one book instead of needing an open browser to d20PFSRD or a freakin book caddy.

But then....I start looking through it, and inevitably I start thinking what to change...sigh.


DanceSC wrote:

Strength checks can be made with the players Ability Score, and assisting a player in a strength check adds in the relevant ability modifier. (Example: 17 strength fighter and a 16 strength fighter: the 17 strength fighter attempts the strength check and the 16 str fighter assists by adding 3 from the ability modifier bringing the total up to 20) - Choosing to do this is considered taking that score on the die roll, just as one would take 10 on a check.

(Reasoning: it never did make sense to me that one could fail to break down a door by simply being 'not strong enough' and yet manage to do it 6 seconds later. Also if a wizard with 8 strength in the party assists, how much are they actually contributing?)

I am seriously going to ninja this!

I am getting tired of having our strongman in the group fail to open a door only to have a stampede of players all rolling to try and aid or play the percentage game until the wizard gets lucky with a high roll and opens it.

Just seems cheesy. Your house rule is nice and clean.

-MD


-We don't role to confirm criticals. If you roll a nat 20, or any number your weapon needs to critical threaten, you get the damage bonus. I think we will be confirming for vorpal sword beheading later on though.

-When you tie an enemy's AC, your weapon locks with theirs. Aka, you got a sword lock. Both combatants then roll a d20, and whoever gets a higher nat roll, gets the attack. It really makes the combat interesting if you tie an enemy's AC, then he rolls better than you on the sword lock roll. That's when he attacks you instead of you attacking him. If you tie the AC when doing a ranged attack, we still have both player and enemy roll a d20. But, if the enemy rolls better it's just a miss for the PC. This rule works when the enemies attack too however.

-We do not have armor checks or have armor slow your movement. But encumberance can still happen if you have a ton of stuff.

Grand Lodge

Seems very cinematic but wouldnt that sword lock rule sort of slow things down, and what about if someone gets sword lock twice... are sword lock counter attacks counted as free attacks or AoO?


As to the actual topic of the thread:

My group has many little house rules, mainly common sense things, developed over the 13 1/2 years of d20. In fact, several of the most basic ones are part of Pathfinder. For instance, unrestricted multiclassing for Monks and Paladins; multiclassing without xp penalties; Mithral weapons treated as silver for DR penetration.

Others are common enough:

-When rolling ability scores, we roll 4d6, take the best 3, re-rolling all ones. Though lately, we've taken to using point buy...with 25 points of course.

-When rolling hit points, you roll once (re-rolling ones), then you may challenge the roll, by rolling again (re-rolling ones). You must take the second roll, even if it is less (except for ones). Personally, I think rolling hit points is the last dinosaur of the silly randomness of character creation and development. I advocate the max -2 rule, cited by DanceSC above.

-Feats that apply to a specific weapon, instead apply to a weapon group as defined in the Fighter class.

Then there are the type of house rules that fuel endless debate on class balance. I must say, in thirteen years, we have seen none of the anguished, nail-biting, balance drama that goes on here daily:

-Clerics do not receive the bonus domain spell slots, and instead may spontaneously cast any of their domain spells just as they do with cure or inflict spells.

-Feats that require levels in certain classes are adjusted as appropriate. In effect, this is only the Fighter exclusives like Weapon Specialization, our prereqs for which are +4 BAB and weapon focus in the chosen weapon.


DanceSC wrote:
Strength checks can be made with the players Ability Score, and assisting a player in a strength check adds in the relevant ability modifier.

A sign I shouldn't be reading the message board this late: the visual of you telling your players to walk over to a weight bench so you can properly assess the player's ability score about made me snarf my drink...

Neat house rule, though, assuming I read that as "character" rather than "player", may have to try it...

-TimD


1) GM bribes must be in the form of small, unmarked bills. Or chocolate.

2) The "Cook People" hex is banned. The GM finds it creepy.

3) I use plot twist cards. Each player draws 2 plot twist cards at the beginning of the session. Cards are shuffled back at the end of the session. GM rewards Plot Twist creativity with bonus experience points.

4) Certain classes are sometimes banned for story reasons. In my current campaign, ninja, samurai, and gunslinger were taken off the table because they did not fit with setting.

5) If breaking out books to look up a rule would take too much time and break the flow of action or story, GM will rule an on-the-fly penalty or bonus to a certain action (usually +2 or -2) and move on.

6) GM disfavors laptops, tablets, and phones at the table unless they are being directly used as a game aid.

7) At low levels, magic to raise the dead is hard to come by.

8) IF player misses a session, his character does not gain XP.

9) New characters start at the beginning of the level of the lowest-level person in the party.

10) Before you crack a pun, remember the GM controls the lightning.


New one I thought of: As a move action that can only be done once per turn, you may take all the extra attacks beyond the first that you would get in a full attack routine. Including all relevant penalties such as for two-weapon fighting.

For example, a 6th level fighter with Haste cast on him can take one move to close with an enemy, then take another move action to perform the -5 Bab attack and the extra attack granted by haste.

Another example: A 6th level Ranger with two-weapon fighting. He may make his attack with his offhand weapon and his second attack with his main weapon, both suffering the penalty for two-weapon fighting, then use his other move action that turn to close with another enemy.


Just thought of one myself: Instead of having the Toughness Feat give an additional Hit Point/level, let the players roll for Hit Points on the next higher die. Barbarians can opt to take the standard +1 HP or use d8+d6 instead.


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

After a lot of mistakes, my last group more or less came to this:

TOUGHNESS
Benefit: Your hit points per die increase by 1.
Special: You may take this feat as often as you want, but it has an upper limit of the die's maximum result in each Class.
d4 classes max at 4 per level, gaining no benefit from a second selection.
d6 classes max at 6 per every level, gaining no benefit from a third selection.
d8 classes max at 8 per every level, gaining no benefit from a fourth selection.
d10 classes max at 10 per every level, gaining no benefit from a fifth selection.
d12 classes max at 12 per every level, gaining no benefit from a sixth selection.


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I have too many house rules to list. But my group has house rules for house rules that are worth mentioning.

1.) House rules are never added mid-session. If we think something needs to be changed we make note of it but play it straight. Between sessions we'll talk it out.

2.) House rules are voted on democratically. Every ones input matters.


Not at home and I haven't run a game in years due to work so I can't call them all to mind but the three I do remember using regularly.

1) Magic retards aging the more powerful the mage the slower they age from just having delayed penalties up to living 10 times as long as a normal person of their race.

2) Skills don't auto fail/succeed a masterful crafter (+25) on a natural one can produce something better than an apprentice (+2) on a natural 20. Of course if you fail to meet a dc that's different and can carry penalties but these are skills and the training can pay off. I remember one game where the scout got a guards interest and rolled a natural one total three to pretend to be a rabbit. The guard also got a natural one total 2 on his opposed check and believed his "tooki tooki bacaw bacaw" was just a rabbit much to his delight.

3) Natural 20's cause extra effects. On the first roll it doesn't make much difference just giving you a chance to critical but if that second roll is also a natural 20 you roll a third time and if you confirm the hit again do maximum damage no rolling. A third natural 20 (very unlikely) and you roll a 4th time if you confirm that hit its either an auto kill (say by beheading) regardless of hp or if they have some form of regeneration/other protection drops them to 0 hp.

First roll: Critical roll again.
Second Roll: confirm critical, natural 20 roll again.
Third roll: Confirm do max damage no need to roll, natural 20 roll again.
Final roll: Confirm insta kill or drop to 0 hp.


Liam Warner wrote:


2) Skills don't auto fail/succeed

That isn't a house rule, that's the way it works RAW.

Liberty's Edge

The Sweater Golem wrote:
Your character's gender has to match your own.

I've used this one in the past, but it was really just a reaction to too many idiot dudes playing junior-high fantasy lesbian characters. I think now I'd allow cross gender, but I'd have a conversation with the player about my expectations for the game.

----

Anyhow, for my actual house rules:

- My players roll their hit dice out in the open. I roll a die at the same time behind the screen. After they see their results, they can ask to take whatever I rolled, but after they opt for my roll they have to keep it (even if it's worse).

- Once per campaign per character, you get a "god call". Roll a D% and if you roll lower than your level, you get to ask for just about anything. They are usually used to try to keep a PC from dying. It started as a joke by one of the players whose favorite part of D&D is the randomness, and it's just stuck.

- I still use weapon proficiencies a la second edition. I hate charging a feat to allow players to pick up non-class weapons.

Scarab Sages

Every level a character gains a 1 build point and then use the point system to increase their abilities. Points can be saved and spent at later level, so it you want to move from 20 to 22 that will take 9 levels.

The point of this rule is to give a leg up to MAD classes and promote more well rounded characters.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Just a couple of the more relevant ones.

1. In addition to the standard requirements, magic item creation requires a formula for the final item, something that needs to be either obtained, stolen, or researched. There are some subsidiary rules relating to this, but they're not important now.

2. I have two classes of simulacra. Lesser simulacra which can be created by spell or magic item effect. They have no magical abilities, nor any knowledge not put into them by their creator and their physical abilites are limited.

Greater Simulacra, which require a piece of the original creature, have more ability, but the chance of breaking from their creator's control becomes greater the more of the original they possess. Anything that gains the power of wish granting automatically becomes free-willed.

3. I allow characters to take up to 2 ranks in trivia skills, such as a non-standard Knowledge, Perform, or Craft skill.


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DanceSC wrote:

Strength checks can be made with the players Ability Score, and assisting a player in a strength check adds in the relevant ability modifier. (Example: 17 strength fighter and a 16 strength fighter: the 17 strength fighter attempts the strength check and the 16 str fighter assists by adding 3 from the ability modifier bringing the total up to 20) - Choosing to do this is considered taking that score on the die roll, just as one would take 10 on a check.

(Reasoning: it never did make sense to me that one could fail to break down a door by simply being 'not strong enough' and yet manage to do it 6 seconds later. Also if a wizard with 8 strength in the party assists, how much are they actually contributing?)

that reminded me of another house rule I use.

In any situations where the party is able to freely communicate, they may use aid another on skills checks. The way this works is that everyone able to make the check rolls. Take the highest result then add +2 for every other player whose roll beats a 10.
Good examples of where this works:
1. Knowledge checks, the players are pooling their knowledge on the subject.
2. Finding traps, the more sets of eyes looking, the better.
3. Strength checks, every player you can get against the door gets to participate.

Overall, it is a good rule to getting the entire group involved in activities that are usually one person jobs.


Quote:
3. I allow characters to take up to 2 ranks in trivia skills, such as a non-standard Knowledge, Perform, or Craft skill.

What's the thinking in this? Also, do you mean non-class skill when you say non-standard?


How do you guys feel about a Strength based 'Break' skill. Some people are much better at kicking down doors than others. Or should the act of breaking stuff never be more than a vanilla Strength check?


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

I may have mentioned a few of these before, but can't remember.

1) Feats that work with a single weapon work with weapon groups instead. Exotic is also a group (Weapon Proficiency (Exotic Heavy Blades)), must have Weapon Proficiency (Heavy Blades) to take.

2) Each class get's X weapon proficiencies (by group). All classes get Simple Weapons. All races with Natural Attacks get Natural Attack Group. Number of groups is based on BAB. Full BAB = 4 groups, 3/4 BAB = 2 groups, 1/2 BAB = 1 group. Multiclassing gives half that number of groups (round down). Classes that usually get full martial have less proficiency, but, they can take Exotic Proficiency at level 1 without spending a feat (Proficiency (Heavy Blades), Proficiency (Exotic Heavy Blades)) so it balances out.

3) Every new player get's a 'Hand of God' freebie to save their bacon, or someone else's. One time only. God's hand reaches out of the clouds, finger thumps the bad guy before he can kill you, and done. :)

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Buri wrote:
Quote:
3. I allow characters to take up to 2 ranks in trivia skills, such as a non-standard Knowledge, Perform, or Craft skill.
What's the thinking in this? Also, do you mean non-class skill when you say non-standard?

Skills like Knowledge(Astronomy) or Craft (Basket-Weaving, Origami) skills which are not generally targets for munchkins. Craft is generally a class skill for all classes, whether the knowledge is class is going to be a case by case. They're meant mainly to give flavor to characters not provide a significant advantage.


Cool!


LazarX wrote:
Skills like Knowledge(Astronomy) or Craft (Basket-Weaving, Origami) skills which are not generally targets for munchkins.

You clearly underestimate the power of Craft (Origami). Excellent, excellent...

*taps fingers together*


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Little animate origami figures that deliver, say, a powder poison, or themselves are the message, in that they unfold after reaching their destination might be extremely cool.


Teleporting into an area of less than Strong Magic* (7th+) or Strong Environmental Effects adds up to +50% on the error chart. *Defined by Detect Magic

Starting characters ability bonuses add up to +10 before racial modifiers, with a maximum and minimum of +4/-1.

Players can make a new character at -1 Average Party Level or have to get their character brought back to life somehow.

Starting gear can only be 25% crafted through skills and feats.

I highly enforce light levels: Dark, Dim, Normal, and Bright, but inexpensive mundane sunshades exist to negate the dazzled effect.

Characters must keep up with their carry weight, especially water and rations.

Writing a page of background story will net you a CR=Your Level in extra xp once per level.

Every session the players vote for two people who did a good job Roleplaying, highest tally wins a CR Xp award, DM doesn't vote.

Skill checks of natural 20 add an additional +20 to the roll.

Failing a skill roll by 5 or more always causes a minor problem. Failing on a 1 causes the worst possible scenario, often leading to unforseen consequences.

Teleport doesn't work while in a Rope Trick.

While sleeping characters are taking 0 on Perception.

Good descriptions of your actions can net a +1 Circumstance Bonus.

Lead blocks most magical effects, it cannot be crafted into armor.

"Coat of Paint" you can reskin items and races so long as they have the same mechanical effects. Ie. The bow looks like an automatic steampunk crossbow, it still requires two hands.

Players cannot reveal their hitpoints to other players without Status, also Players do not reveal their hitpoints to the DM.

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Muad'Dib wrote:
TriOmegaZero wrote:
On a natural 20, the first damage die is maximized. If the confirmation roll is a natural 20, the second damage die is maximized.

We use this at our table and I loved it... until I got one-shotted by that power attacking x3 scythe wielding Golem living in the Shadow Clock in the Rise of the Runelords adventure path.

Started at full health...ended up dead before I got to swing my weapon.

-MD

That is a risk, but I believe the damage dice actually mattered very little in that calculation. Scythe crits kill with or without maximum damage rolled.


A few big ones ...
All classes (except INT-focused ones like Wizard, Magus, Psion) get at least 4 skill points per level.

Racially-restricted mechanics are only racially restricted if they apply directly to a race's mechanics. Stabbing Shot, foe example, can be taken by anybody, not just elves. Applies to traits, feats, favored class bonuses, prestige classes, whatever.

The 1/20 auto fail/success rule is removed.

Divine Magic out, Psionics in. Clerics and druids are wizard archetypes. Paladins are banned. Rangers are arcane casters (That can cast in up to Medium Armor w/o penalty). (In progress)


Zhayne wrote:
Paladins are banned...

Personal dislike or practical reason?

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Being that divine magic is out...


Jaelithe wrote:
Zhayne wrote:
Paladins are banned...
Personal dislike or practical reason?

Yes.


Great thread. A lot of you use some of the stuff we do. Stat rolling. HP system.

Generally we accept a lot if we like the character and the concept first. If your concept is to "do X amount of damage" and they are otherwise personality-less, our group makes you go back and try again. That's not to say you can't make a good character concept that is also good a killing things.

One thing that helps with power creep is to adopt the 2E model where after level ten you just get a fixed number of HP every level, usually on the small end.

We also brought back the concentration skill because we use it for a lot of things. Archers, mages, monk's being able to glean some extra oomf from their meditations, etc.

Shadow Lodge

Coarthios wrote:
We also brought back the concentration skill because we use it for a lot of things. Archers, mages, monk's being able to glean some extra oomf from their meditations, etc.

I tend to use the Autohypnosis skill from 3.5/Dreamscarred's Psionics stuff for this.

Sczarni

My groups house rules are as follows

1. Monks can be any alignment
2. Every 4 levels you gain a +1 to two ability scores, instead of just one ability score.
3. The Racial Heritage Feat can be taken by any race not just human.
4. Dwarves gain the bonus from Fast Movement even if wearing heavy armor or carrying a heavy load.
5. If it is printed by Paizo then it is always allowed.

I think there are more but off the top of my head I can not think of anymore.


Zhayne wrote:

A few big ones ...

All classes (except INT-focused ones like Wizard, Magus, Psion) get at least 4 skill points per level.

I've noticed this a lot. Is there a reason that wizards et al, shouldn't benefit from those 2 extra skill points?

It's a bit like saying that you won't enforce encumberance rules for classes except barbarians, fighters etc. Or that eve ryone gets lightning reflexes for free except classes with evaision.

Is there a reason that classes who benefit naturally from high Int shouldn't actaully know more skills when classes that don't do?

My aplogies if this comes across as agressive. I am genuinally curious.

Sovereign Court

@Zodin:

I've been considering increased skill points as well. It generally goes like this:

- Fighters, Paladins, Clerics, Sorcerers have 2+Int skill points, and generally don't have high Int. But ~2 skill points per level is just not enough; skills are a HUGE part of having exciting stuff to do besides combat. So these classes NEED an increase.

- Wizards and Witches also have 2+Int skill points, but usually have Int 16+, so they get 5+ skill points. That, combined with their out-of-combat spell possibilities, is quite enough for them to have a good time.

- Rogues justify their miserable existence by having lots of skills, but if they want to do something in combat as well, can't afford a huge Int score, so they'll be at ~8 skill points.

No class should regularly get more skill points than the class that justifies its existence with skills. If Wizards and Witches got 4+Int skill points, there'd be trouble.

TL;DR: Int-based classes don't NEED more skill points. Non-Int based 2+ skill classes do NEED the skill points.


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
The Terrible Zodin wrote:
Is there a reason that wizards et al, shouldn't benefit from those 2 extra skill points?

Back when we were first interrogating the 3.0 writers, one said that they did that to encourage a party to be more 'interdependent' to each other. If everyone had 'level+3' in ALL their skills, there would be neither a spotlight moment for X player to shine nor ultimately any reason for Skills beyond just basing them on your level.

"Hey, Joe, what's your bonus to that check? Why I'm level 5, so 5!"

Ascalaphus does have several interesting thoughts, some of which are depressingly possible, but then I'm not a real Witch fan. But they are intriguing...

Sovereign Court

Fighters and Paladins often sit twiddling their thumbs outside combat, because everyone else is just better at the noncombat stuff. With a very small selection of class skills, fighters really have a tough time of it.

Sorcerers and clerics are supposed to have some social game - Diplomacy, Bluff etc, but with the few skill points they get, they can't afford to be both a good Face and still keep up the Spellcraft and Knowledges expected from them.

So the 2+Int/non-Int-based classes need a bit of help. As a Wizard player, sure, I always WANTED more, but I didn't quite NEED it.

Dark Archive

One house rule I like throwing in is removing the component cost of animate dead. The things you make with it aren't all that powerful, and charging a character that's already having to spend valuable spells on these castings is kinda silly to me.


The Terrible Zodin wrote:
Zhayne wrote:

A few big ones ...

All classes (except INT-focused ones like Wizard, Magus, Psion) get at least 4 skill points per level.

I've noticed this a lot. Is there a reason that wizards et al, shouldn't benefit from those 2 extra skill points?

It's a bit like saying that you won't enforce encumberance rules for classes except barbarians, fighters etc. Or that eve ryone gets lightning reflexes for free except classes with evaision.

Is there a reason that classes who benefit naturally from high Int shouldn't actaully know more skills when classes that don't do?

My aplogies if this comes across as agressive. I am genuinally curious.

Another thing worth pointing out is simple mechanics. If you are a typical Wizard or the like, you'll automatically have an extra +3 skill points or so more than another class with 2 per level. You can say that you can play a character with combat expertise but that is rather limiting and there are only so many points you have to spend on secondary and tertiary stats.

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