Craft Selection for Wizard


Advice

Lantern Lodge

Having played fighters or rogues (or variants thereof), I have decided to change things up with a new wizard character. I've got the build done, except for one small thing. Craft skill. What would be the best specialization to pick for Craft? I figure basketry is out (although there could be some comedy in enchanted baskets...or even a market. Not knowing what wizards can do at higher levels, and given the plethora spells out there, what would work best? Thanks for any suggestions you folks are willing to give.
Keith


Does a wizard need a craft skill?


Most magic item creation can be done using Spellcraft, so you are probably best to put your ranks in that. Other than that, it depends if you think you will make more wands, potions or other things. Craft Jewellery can be quite handy for things other than making magic items since you can increase the value of some found gems (although you might want to start holding on to gems to be used as spell components later).
have a look at the sort of magic items you think you would like to be making. Most will have the required skill listed in their description.

Edit: Surrounded by Ninjas.

Liberty's Edge

If you are planning to go into item crafting such as wonderful items, armor and weapons, or the like you only need spell craft. You can substitute it for those rolls. However if you want to make a plain sword with no magic you need the feat.

Lantern Lodge

Not necessarily, I suppose, but it is in their Craft Skills list. I'm kind of looking at it from the idea that later on they could use the craft to create items that could then be imbued with some magical quality. Like, making jewelry that they could then work into a magical item or whatever. Not knowing the magic system , or the (extensive yet fun) spell list all that well, I'm just kinda looking for suggestions that others might have used in a build.


As a wizard, my answer would be, whatever suits the character. However, wizards are skill-starved, even with their high Intelligence, and your skill points may be better spent on things like Perception (everyone needs it), the Knowledge family (unless your party has a bard), and perhaps Escape Artist (unless you're a Teleporter).

If you really want to focus on your out-of-combat skills, may I suggest Profession (merchant) and perhaps some kind of smithing.

Lantern Lodge

Thanks. This has given me a little bit to think about. Man, being a newbie is HARD !!


Of course Craft (Alchemy) is useful. It allows you to make Alchemist's Fire and useful stuff like that. Although it takes a ridiculous amount of time compared to true magic items.


mcv wrote:
Of course Craft (Alchemy) is useful. It allows you to make Alchemist's Fire and useful stuff like that. Although it takes a ridiculous amount of time compared to true magic items.

Our GM allowed the product Making Craft Work to combat that problem.

After all, why should it take 10 times as long to make an object out of solid gold as it would to make the exact same object out of solid silver?


Don't bother putting skill points into Craft as it can be performed untrained. Furthermore, with a few simple spells (Crafters Fortune) and your naturally high INT you'll be fine without any ranks. (Also, Masterwork Transformation and Fabricate will let you make a non-casting crafter look like a lazy layabout.)


Craft Gemcutting :)

Make your own Diamond Dust for Wishes.

Scarab Sages

OK, here's the trick with crafting. Craft is a INT based skill that works untrained.

So a 10th level wizard with:

26 Int (Base 20 INT + 2 level bonus + 4 Headband of vast int) = +8
Masterwork tools = +2
Crafter's Fortune = +5

Grants you a craft bonus in ALL CRAFT SKILLS of +15

You may now cast the fabricate spell, and take 10 on the craft roll and make anything with a DC of 25 or lower (including masterwork weapons!) instantly.

Why take a crafting skill at all?

If you REALLY want to get good, spend 2 skill points, and you can push any one skill up to a +30 while taking 10.

I usually put a point into craft alchemy though. This lets me make alchemy skill rolls as knowledge checks to identify chemicals and whatnot. This is a house rule, but I've never seen a DM who didn't use it.

By the way, this is a great way of making money: Use fabricate to craft a spyglass. Cost = 333.33 gold to make, Price = 1000. Sold at half price = 166.67 profit. Sell them to your friends for oh, say, 750 gp, and make even more money.

There are many other items to do this with.


PSusac wrote:

OK, here's the trick with crafting. Craft is a INT based skill that works untrained.

So a 10th level wizard with:

26 Int (Base 20 INT + 2 level bonus + 4 Headband of vast int) = +8
Masterwork tools = +2
Crafter's Fortune = +5

Grants you a craft bonus in ALL CRAFT SKILLS of +15

You may now cast the fabricate spell, and take 10 on the craft roll and make anything with a DC of 25 or lower (including masterwork weapons!) instantly.

Why take a crafting skill at all?

Because all Wizards start with 20 INT and are 10th level, right?

...or they start at 1st level with 16-18 INT and a single rank in a class skill puts them at +7-8 and they can do mundane crafting out the gate. By 3rd level they can probably Take10 and get a 20, which is good enough for most crafting. Why wait until 9th level?

There are plenty of other reasons to take Craft skills, however. Maybe your Wizard LIKES working with his hands. Maybe you want to be able to pass yourself off as an ordinary Blacksmith. Maybe you don't want to keep Mending, Make Whole and Crafter's Fortune prepared.

Though this does make me wonder why Craft skills are not Trained only (or at very least, you can only use them untrained on DC10 or lower tasks).


Assuming you are going for flavour, rather than power:

Craft (Bookbinding) - make your own spellbooks
Craft (Woodturning) - if you plan on taking the Craft Wand feat later
Craft (Alchemy) - as above, for brew potion
Craft (Calligraphy) - this is not just a scroll of enlarge person, this is a really pretty scroll of enlarge person
Craft (Tailor) - You're fighting people with swords. While wearing robes. Tailoring is necessary to preserve your modesty and/or the other players' sanity

Scarab Sages

Personally, I like Craft (Glassblowing) for making alembics and test-tubes and whatnot.

But alchemy is definitely the power-gamer's choice.


Helic wrote:

Because all Wizards start with 20 INT and are 10th level, right?

...or they start at 1st level with 16-18 INT and a single rank in a class skill puts them at +7-8 and they can do mundane crafting out the gate. By 3rd level they can probably Take10 and get a 20, which is good enough for most crafting. Why wait until 9th level?

There are plenty of other reasons to take Craft skills, however. Maybe your Wizard LIKES working with his hands. Maybe you want to be able to pass yourself off as an ordinary Blacksmith. Maybe you don't want to keep Mending, Make Whole and Crafter's Fortune prepared.

Though this does make me wonder why Craft skills are not Trained only (or at very least, you can only use them untrained on DC10 or lower tasks).

They don't all start with 20 INT, no, but full casters are the ones who can actually justify doing that. You'd be far more likely to see a 20 INT Wizard than a 20 STR Fighter or a 20 WIS Monk.

And he is talking about using the Fabricate spell, which you don't get until level 9 anyway, and at that point you'll probably make it to 10.

And if you like crafting, you're not going to be preparing Crafter's Fortune in a spell slot or anything. It might be a nice thing to put in your 1st level Transmutation bonus spell slot, but, more likely, I imagine you'll have created a 1/day use item of it or simply prepared some scrolls of it.

What PSusac is trying to get at is, once a Wizard picks up the Fabricate spell, they blow away any trained, professional crafter. You could literally have 100 ranks in the craft skill of your choice and the Wizard will still outperform you.

Even with a 16-18 starting INT, that means you can craft anything for the same price as actual crafters and in a fraction of the time. The only things you can't guarantee crafting when you're working by yourself? 5+ Strength rated composite bows, antitoxin, sunrod, tanglefoot bags, and thunderstones.

Scarab Sages

Exactly my point thank you.

It's SORT of worth it (but not really) to drop a point into one or two craft skills as a wizard. Just one point in each skill to get the trained bonus, but all that really does is let you be awesome a little sooner, and let you "reasonably" use craft as a sort of knowledge skill in odd situations.

I plan for my wizard to drop one point each into
Alchemy - to make VATS of alchemist fire that are shrunk using shrink item.
Glassblowing - To make some spare cash selling spyglasses
Weapons - to make some spare cash selling masterwork weapons

The only REAL reason to go "all the way" on any craft skill is in TRAPMAKING

This skill allows you to craft traps with progressively higher DC's. This is sort of interesting from a role-playing campaign point of view, but it has a limited use for an adventuring mage who is trying to break IN to secure areas, as opposed to keeping people OUT.

There is ONE combat use I can think of though:

Craft a mobile trap (let's say a ballista that triggers when you open a door, or an alchemical trap that goes off when you hit a pressure plate).

Cast shrink item on it, and put it in your pocket. Now if you are camping out in the dungeon or otherwise know that the bad guys are bearing down on you, you have a mobile trap that you can set up in a few minutes.

This is clearly of highly limited use for two reasons:
1) It's highly situational.
2) It's highly subject to DM interpretation.

So IF you have a defense scenario, and IF you have a DM that's cool with it, you MIGHT get some play out of a maxed out "craft (traps)" skill.

Magic destroys crafting. So...

Bibpity bopity boo.

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