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Grand Lodge

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PMG wrote:
Do I have enough oranges to stave off scurvy?

If not, just mix some reds and yellows together.

Grand Lodge

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PMG wrote:
Does the speaker use more power than Bluetooth?

Ms Pelosi would have us believe so.

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

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Are time travelers skipping this era due to quarantine?

Shadow Lodge

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am0ng many 0ther reas0ns, yes

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

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What color chess pieces work best on a black-and-white board?


Gary Teter wrote:
Do I have enough oranges to stave off scurvy?

Probably; even if that number is "zero," though it is still possible.

(Literally any store with comestibles should provide something that somehow fends it off.)

It's really weird we get it, though.


Gary Teter wrote:
What color chess pieces work best on a black-and-white board?

The world may never know.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

I'm not surprised. Are you?


captain yesterday wrote:
I'm not surprised. Are you?

But do they get scurvy?

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

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How well do ants see in the dark?

Scarab Sages

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First and foremost, insects (and arthropods in general, mostly) obviously don't process light the way you softskinned mammals do.

That said, most ants live in subterranean tunnels in their mounds or nests, and thus live the majority of their lives devoid of all but the barest amount of light if not in total darkness, and many only emerge from their hives when attacked or disturbed or by night to avoid heat and/or light-using predators. Many species of ants are even completely blind.

Study of the structure of non-blind species of ants' eyes suggests they have quite competent night vision, as would be expected, primarily focused around observing landmarks for navigation and, of course, their primary predators. Much of this is ongoing study, like all sciences, but this seems to be a fairly well-established line of conjecture.

[Source]

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

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How many things have I eaten that were secretly super gross inside but I had no idea?

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

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So is it fair to say that when I smoosh an ant, it never saw it coming?

Scarab Sages

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Gary Teter wrote:
So is it fair to say that when I smoosh an ant, it never saw it coming?

As stated above, insects don't really perceive the world the way you mammals do. An ant really can't tell major differences between you and any other large obstacle/landmass - such as, for example, a tree - at a distance other than recognizing that you can move. You're just part of the environment to them, if a mobile and potentially threatening predator-esque part. And that's assuming you're not dealing with one of the blind species.

Add your increased size and reach compared to an insect and the rather slower reflexes of an ant compared to more agile arthropods such as pretty much anything that flies, and it's quite likely they just can't process your movement quickly enough to really react.

In short: yes, they see you coming, presuming they're not blind. But your approaching to squish them is as overwhelming and unavoidable to a slow-moving walking ant as an imminent mudslide, sinkhole, or tsunami would be to a human standing directly at the epicenter of its oncoming path.


Gary Teter wrote:
How many things have I eaten that were secretly super gross inside but I had no idea?

Define "gross inside."

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

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What would happen if I plugged that centaur into my computer’s USB port?

Dark Archive

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I'm pretty sure it doesn't have a compatible cable.

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

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How many people on that zoom aren’t wearing pants?

Scarab Sages

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Define "pants".

Dark Archive

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Gary Teter wrote:
How many people on that zoom aren’t wearing pants?

Safe estimate: everyone who has their camera turned off and at least half the people with cameras on but positioned so you can't see from the waist down.

Grand Lodge

PMG wrote:
How many things have I eaten that were secretly super gross inside but I had no idea?

If we were just talking 'gross' – eg. worm in an apple OR Krusty personally spat in your Krusty-burger during the ’84 Olympics – it’s hard to say.

But we’re talking ‘super-gross’ which implies the body’s natural defense mechanisms would be activated.

Hence, regardless of the direction (and portal via which) the ‘super-grossity’ exited your body, I believe you would have had at least some idea about it every time.

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

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Why do the hands on a clock go clockwise?


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Gary Teter wrote:
Why do the hands on a clock go clockwise?

They only do so in the Northern hemisphere. Below the Equator, they go the other way, as any Australian will confirm.

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

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Why does just-salted food taste warmer?

Scarab Sages

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Blast it! My search engines only want to answer why re-warmed food tastes salty. Clearly some internal recalibration is in order.

I'll get back to you.

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

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Do ducks and crows get along?

Scarab Sages

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Gary Teter wrote:
Do ducks and crows get along?

Depends on the type of duck. Mallards are known to have a long festering feud with crows, and both will attack each other on sight. Teals have, or so it's rumored, recently begun dealing under the table with the crows, in order to gain access to some preferred nesting grounds. Wood ducks have a decades long alliance with crows, mostly attributed to a perceived slight one of the old Mallard elders visited upon a renowned wood duck hero.

With most other ducks, it varies from moment to moment.

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

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Can you tell I gave myself this haircut?

Scarab Sages

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Gary Teter wrote:
Can you tell I gave myself this haircut?

Yes! And as a connoisseur of self-given haircuts, allow me to compliment you on what a wonderful job you did.


*squints at avatar*

... wow, that is an impressive ooze-like shine! Musta picked your razor well to get that smooth!

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

How many live ants could you fit in your ear if you were careful not to smoosh any?


I don't like where this is going.

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

Why did I eat all that candy?

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

Could an ant, or a series of ants, make it to your brain if they crawled up your nose while you sleep?

Scarab Sages

Gary Teter wrote:
Could an ant, or a series of ants, make it to your brain if they crawled up your nose while you sleep?

As long as they don't take that left turn at Albuquerque.


Gary Teter wrote:
Why did I eat all that candy?

Because the Sugar Bugs sent out their nanotech drones, which send signals to your brain, making you desire to eat more sugary foods.


Gary Teter wrote:
Could an ant, or a series of ants, make it to your brain if they crawled up your nose while you sleep?

I REALLY don't like where this is going.

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

What makes a shell a shell?

Scarab Sages

Gary Teter wrote:
What makes a shell a shell?

A supernatural, other dimensional place of punishment for the wicked.

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

Do germs stick to your hair?

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

Of the ant species in which the entire colony will travel to a safe place and and then cluster together in a tight ball to hibernate, which are native to North American pillows?

Scarab Sages

Gary Teter wrote:
Do germs stick to your hair?

Yes, but not all germs are really adapted to living there. They'll either transfer to your skin (probably the next time you run your hands thru your hair), die on their own after a time, or be attacked by your natural bodily bacteria that lives in the area and isn't keen on visitors.

To provide more detail I'll need to know exactly what germ we're discussing, as specific details can vary widely.

Scarab Sages

Gary Teter wrote:
Do germs stick to your hair?

What is this "hair" of which you speak?

Scarab Sages

Gary Teter wrote:
Of the ant species in which the entire colony will travel to a safe place and and then cluster together in a tight ball to hibernate, which are native to North American pillows?

The ones that are plotting the downfall of mankind.

Scarab Sages

Gary Teter wrote:
Of the ant species in which the entire colony will travel to a safe place and and then cluster together in a tight ball to hibernate, which are native to North American pillows?

In an attempt to answer this semi seriously...

Ants are attracted to beds for two main reasons - food and moisture. If you're eating in bed, you're littering the place with crumbs, and the ants will make a feast of it. If you sweat in bed - an inevitability, really - they might be attracted to the moisture and/or the electrolytes and salts in your sweat. Some humans also produce pheromones that ants like, though we aren't quite sure why.

If you have issues with ants in your bed, best bet is to cease eating there, give all your bedding a thorough washing - pillows and coveralls included - and possibly deploy ant killer traps or sprays if you can find the source of where they're entering the house/room. Keeping this up on the regular should keep the ant invasions at bay.

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

Do birds know when they’ve pooped?

Scarab Sages

Gary Teter wrote:
Do birds know when they’ve pooped?

Depends on the bird. Most of them, I'd say "no". Blue Jays, however, are flying d#+*$eads. They know exactly when, and on whom, they poop.

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

If squirrels had naked, hairless tails would we still feed them?

Paizo Employee Senior Software Developer

If squirrels had several hairless, prehensile tails would we instinctively kill them on sight?


Gary Teter wrote:
If squirrels had several hairless, prehensile tails would we instinctively kill them on sight?

F#!%ing A right!

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