Goblinworks Blog: Iron and Coke, Chromium Steel


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CEO, Goblinworks

"Terrible idea" was a really poor choice of words. Shouldn't post while multitasking in the middle of worrying about PaizoCon. :(

Goblinworks Executive Founder

HalfOrc with a Hat of Disguise wrote:

Guys.

Random idea that came to me as I sit here with a 3-day-old headache and a raging fever.

Relics. What if the Relics are what we need to 'unlock' the final stages of the Settlements?

12 Relics. 3 Fighter-type Relics, 3 Rogue-type Relics, 3 Wizard-type Relics, 3 Cleric-type Relics.

Holding 1 Relic for X amount of time will allow your Settlement to achieve the 'final stage', ie 'maxing' out your Settlement's growth, but the trick is that the Relics will focus on a specific type of Development Index.

Fighter Type Relics might augment the Settlement's defenses, offenses or training costs of Fighters.

Rogue Type Relics might augment the Settlement's wealth-per-day ratios, diplomacy with NPC factions or training costs of Rogues.

Cleric Type Relics might augment the number and efficiency of healing spells that can be cast within the Settlement's borders, affect the Undead and Outsider-type Mobs in a variety of ways, depending upon the alignment of the Settlement in question and affect the training costs of Clerics.

Wizard Type Relics might augment the number and power of spells cast within the Settlement's borders, augment specific schools of magic and affect the training costs of Wizards.

So that's 12 'Settlements' that could reach their full potential ... but wait, there's more!

So that's a LN, a NN, and a CN settlement, each with four relics and in a mutual alliance where they demolish any upstart who dares compete. Their only threat comes from traitors, so they keep the top levels of training restricted to their inner circle.

Contrast the same kind of setup, but where the relics are created through escalations. Now the cabal has to win every single escalation and keep all of the relics so created out of the hands of upstarts; they can't do that with a relatively small number of people, so it's easier to infiltrate and get top-level training in preparation to compete, or to intercept a relic on the way back from a distant operation and hit the convoy with overwhelming force once. Once the resistance has a relic, they train as much as possible and now the original cabal has lost their advantage but not their ill will.

There's a huge difference between 'there are only so many' and 'they enter the game at a very slow rate'.

Goblin Squad Member

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Words in the wind may cool the skin, but misguided desire is an eternal fire...

Goblin Squad Member

DeciusBrutus wrote:


So that's a LN, a NN, and a CN settlement, each with four relics and in a mutual alliance where they demolish any upstart who dares compete. Their only threat comes from traitors, so they keep the top levels of training restricted to their inner circle.

Contrast the same kind of setup, but where the relics are created through escalations. Now the cabal has to win every single escalation and keep all of the relics so created out of the hands of upstarts; they can't do that with a relatively small number of people, so it's easier to infiltrate and get top-level training in preparation to compete, or to intercept a relic on the way back from a...

Basically, yes. And let's assume that even learning the general location of a Relic is a random event, which bread-crumb trails leading to dead ends, other content and even into rival player's cities .... MORE CONTENT!

My theory was that you couldn't 'hold' more than 2 Relics ... and since they would be randomly found, that means it's highly unlikely that a Settlement may get the Relic they want.

Trading Relics would naturally be a very tense, knife-edge meeting.

Thieves will naturally throw themselves at the Settlements that hold the Relic to try and capture the prize, who will in turn be targeted by the enraged Settlements, their Patrons might decide to send enforcers along to remind the Thieves who it's supposed to go to, and if the Thief gets killed and somebody else loots the Relic, all hell breaks loose as everyone starts trying to uncover who holds the Relic now.

It might even add a option 'step' to sieges, taking or neutralizing the Relics to deny the defenders their additional bonuses.

And of course, holding a Relic makes you a very tempting target for Rival Settlements.

And depending upon the Relic in question, you might be facing an increasing number of Escalations that are focused on recovering the Relic for the NPCs, which might drag more of your players from the front-lines to handle the ever-increasing numbers of Vampires/Werewolves/Insane Cultists/Irate Druids/Tucker's Kobolds coming after your Settlement directly.

Power will always come with a cost. To gain the power of a Relic, and all the benefits that will bring, there must in turn be an interesting cost, be it an increased chance of war, outright hostility with your neighbours, a huge surge in thieves sneaking into your town and lowering the realm's wealth and safety indexes or just an army of the Undead camped on your doorstep, a Relic should be a double-edged sword to account for it's immense power.

Goblin Squad Member

Ryan Dancey wrote:
"Terrible idea" was a really poor choice of words. Shouldn't post while multitasking in the middle of worrying about PaizoCon. :(

"Problematic Idea" , would be received better and with your intended purpose of sparking discussion.

Thank you for your response.

Oh, and try not to worry too much about PaizoCon, you all are doing a great job with PFO.

Goblin Squad Member

Tbh, I'm well aware that Ryan likes to throw curve balls at us, using a variety of means to elicit reactions. All good as long as we know which rules we're all playing by I guess. :D

Back on topic: I'm still of the main opinion (if you don't like that then I have other side-opinions!) that the Great Crafters (ie players) will be the one's who's sigil, mark, brand etc will be on the greatest items in all The River Kingdoms. Some dev-event ie divine intervention/acts of god would be temporary or otherwise exceptions to that rule. /2 coin

Goblin Squad Member

Gayel Nord wrote:
Simple, it doesnt encourage confrontation. If there a rule of one artifact by settlement...

My understanding was that there would be a number of artifacts limited to the number of Settlement Hexes, but that a single Settlement could control them all.

It seems to me the problem generally boils down to power balance. If they're powerful enough to be worthwhile, they will be too powerful if (when) they are all in the hands of a single Settlement. Conversely, if having all of them doesn't provide a significant advantage, then it's really not worthwhile to try to acquire any of them.

When I played ArcticMUD, they had limited items like this. I remember there were only three of a particular staff. However, they wiped the entire server at least once a year. I think that truly unique items, or limited quantity items, are not really compatible with a persistent world. They're either too powerful when all held by the same group, or they're not powerful enough to be worth the trouble of acquiring.

Dark Archive Goblin Squad Member

Decaying relics? Once obtained, the relic only has a limited life. Once over, the relic is gone.

Or just decaying bonuses. Over time, the bonus provided by a relic slowly shrinks down to half strength, so you have to go get a new one.

For more interesting stuff, have the bonus decay for only your village. So for you it only provides 50% bonus, but for someone else it would provide the full 100%. If you got it back somehow, it would still only provide the 50%, to prevent relic abuse.

So village A and village B both have a relic that provides a similar bonus, but both have had their relic long enough that they are both at 50%, so the leaders arrange a trade. They bring their relics to a neutral zone, and get attacked by village C who wants both their relics. During the fighting, B takes advantage of the situation and swipes A's relic and takes off with both. A decides to cut it losses and allies with C, and both declare war on B, who falls to their combined might, and C gets A's old relic and A gets B's relic, and B gets a bloody nose.

Goblin Squad Member

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Stephen Cheney wrote:
Sadurian wrote:
As I read it, the proposed system will see the PC as little more than a delivery agent - someone to pass the materials on to the factory and collect them. I realise that the PC skill affects the final outcome, but I would prefer to have the PC actually make things. A GW2-style crafting action at a suitable workstation, where the PC is the one turning iron and coal into steel and not a faceless NPC factory.

Honestly, the system is likely to be loosely sketched enough that it's up to you to decide whether you're overseeing a bunch of apprentices and other workers, or whether you're spending all your offline time doing it mostly by yourself. The important considerations are:

  • Creating things takes "realistic" amounts of time, as opposed to instantaneously combining items (or having a nominal seconds-long crafting bar). A major benefit of higher skill is turning out items faster. This makes it harder to flood the market with something without lots of advance preparation. Settlements in particular will need to make sure they're not taking for granted that they can just keep raw materials in storage and have their crafters turn them into goods as needed without significant lead time.
  • We're not going to make you stand there and watch a really long crafting progress bar. Once you've got something queued up, you can then do other things. As noted, it's likely to be up to you how you want to roleplay it; are you just checking in to oversee your employees or when you're logged out is your character in the workshop with sleeves rolled up churning out items? Fully dedicated crafters will use this time to keep different queues running and topped up, track down new materials, and sell finished goods. Players for whom crafting is a sideline will set up a project and then go adventure or do whatever else is their primary activity.

I am just catching up after being on a vacation, but this entry caught my eye. Most games have a crafting system that speeds your skill level up at a ridiculous pace early on, only to slow down to a very slow pace at higher levels due to a scarcity of materials (Raid level items, orbs, unique items or ingredients). Most of the gathering is item specific, not resource camps (I like the resource camps). Most of the refining is item specific and you get one point per item refined at the lower levels, with the “Crafting” bar zipping along under your character. This I do not like much…very unrealistic. The secondary refining, or primary crafting stage (the foggy skill area between refinement and finished product which may have several stages of creation/assembly) varies on the skills.

May I suggest these phases of crafting, and the managing of the resource collecting and crafting management are a perfect fit for the skill system you are developing in PFO. Initially a low level resource harvester can only pick grapes in bunches, and transport them back to town, while a grape picker who has trained up in “Basic Resource Gathering” or better, “Advanced Resource Gathering”, and still better yet, “Resource Gathering Management” in order to move from a lousy grape picker (no skill), to a marginal grape picker (Basic), to a really efficient grape picker (Advanced), then moving up to being able to manage harvesting vineyard efficient manner. A noob grape picker should be bad at it, while an experienced and learned, long-term grape picker should certainly be better at it, even awesome!

Let’s get into processing grapes and turning them into wine! Your basic winemaker can start at a very basic level (“Basic Winemaking”) and can make small batches of marginal quality product (great for winos, think Mad Dog 20/20). Your “Advanced Winemaker” can make serviceable wine worthy of being sold to a broader market, but it is still quantity over quality. Then “Wine Production Management” would allow this same player the ability to oversee the production process, and at this point moves from making the wine himself to being able to set up the operation and have wine made while logged off.

I went into some detail in a previous thread a few months ago about the specializing in a crafting category (“Blacksmithing”, then “Swordmaking”, then “Two-handed Sword Specialization”). This process would be no different. I remember 9 levels to becoming a master two-handed sword crafter, able to make a legendary masterpiece worthy of the highest level enchantments (I’m thinking at least six to nine months before the player is maxed out in that skill) . Same goes for winemaking or any other fine crafting skill.

Any dope can squeeze grapes. Only a master vintner can make legendary wine. And only someone proficient in winemaking operations should be able to produce wine when the lights are off.

Goblin Squad Member

I have to say that trying to think of why Bluud's idea might have a significant downside we haven't thought of beyond inviting other city-states to desire what we have and invite our own destruction, still it may be that we stumble upon Ryan's thinking while thinking about the good it could mean for the game.

I rather like HalfOrc's concept of providing content, the stuff of tales and legends. Perhaps an epic tale of discovery, of wrngling out obscure clues, of finding maps, and references in old tales told by campfires.

But perhaps the problem is only that it is the Game providing content rather than the players.

But perhaps the problem is in the limitation of 'One per settlement hex'. If it is discovered and becomes common knowledge that every settlement hex has a corresponding unique artifact or ring of power then what does the community focus on? Entitlement? The regular, commonplace unique item that every settlement takes for granted?

Goblin Squad Member

The reason I suggested 12 Relics originally is that it ties into the four main 'paths' to power. Martial, Stealth, Divine, Arcane.

There's nothing to say that the Relics will be uncovered on day 1.

There's nothing to say that a powerful NPC Faction might possess the Relic, which can lead to an Alliance of Convenience between the most powerful PC Factions that might turn into a free-for-all on the cusps of victory as the squabbling over who gets the Relic turns violent.

There's nothing to say that Relics might not have a powerful curse upon them. They might be like the Dragonballs, use them, bang, you get a 'year' of their power, but they disappear into a random Hex and are rendered powerless for that 'year'.

Meaning that merely possessing a Relic doesn't mean you have it's power, nor that it is a permanent effect, meaning that Charters/Guilds/Groups looking to turn their Settlement into a City have only one in-game 'Year' to make it happen.

Such powerful Items are likely held by equally powerful Entities. Dragons, Demons, Elemental Powers, Fey Courts and the like might all need to be defeated, negotiated with or placated to gain access to the Relics.

Looting a Rabbit and finding a Relic would be at once a hilarious drinking story and an immense cop-out.

Specific Buildings, Rituals, Magical Components and/or specific conjunctions of the Stars or Planetary Bodies might be required to 'activate' the Relic, all of which might require months of research and planning to pull off ... and if you miss the first 'opening' to use the Relic, it could be months (again) before the opportunity presents itself again.

Goblin Squad Member

I have to admit. I don't like what I'm reading in project update #55. It sounds like collecting resources is going to be both a major component of the game and a major pain in the ass. I don't mind having to have resources to build a community, but I loath the idea of having to put so much work into it. I also loath the idea that I couldn't build a community that is self sufficient.

Seriously, if I have to devote hours every week to maintaining resources and putting so much work into crafting then I probably will NOT play this game. Crafting gear is good. But I want to be able to buy it at a store too or buy it at an auction. I don't want to be forced to make all of my equipment, especially with all the steps involved.

You're emphasizing a part of the game that I have never found fun in any game. Even Civ simplified how resources were gained and used in subsequent versions.

Please, don't make this such an intricate part of the game. Let us play the game. Don't make us work too. This is supposed to be fun.

Goblin Squad Member

There are different types of players, broadly speaking. Specifically, each player is unique: everyone has a different play-style.

Of those play-styles that are permitted, and those to be encouraged, there are some broad categories. Explorers, builders, social, killer, etc..

The game design is to be sandbox, meaning that each player can pick and choose how they will play.

That means you will be able to play as a community organizer or not, as you prefer. You won't have to do what you consider work, but someone else who enjoy that as their play will be able to.

It is up to you how you will play the game. That is pretty much the whole point of sandboxing. The design will not force or channel your play-style, except if it is destructive to the game.

Goblin Squad Member

TNR wrote:

I have to admit. I don't like what I'm reading in project update #55. It sounds like collecting resources is going to be both a major component of the game and a major pain in the ass. I don't mind having to have resources to build a community, but I loath the idea of having to put so much work into it. I also loath the idea that I couldn't build a community that is self sufficient.

Seriously, if I have to devote hours every week to maintaining resources and putting so much work into crafting then I probably will NOT play this game. Crafting gear is good. But I want to be able to buy it at a store too or buy it at an auction. I don't want to be forced to make all of my equipment, especially with all the steps involved.

You're emphasizing a part of the game that I have never found fun in any game. Even Civ simplified how resources were gained and used in subsequent versions.

Please, don't make this such an intricate part of the game. Let us play the game. Don't make us work too. This is supposed to be fun.

Gathering is going to be a lot more fun than you are used to. You don't just beat rocks to death. There will be major spawns of monsters tat are attracted as well as PC's that will contest them. Gathering is a major guild undertaking that takes planning and muscle. The PC's probably won't even be doing the gathering emotes, they set up camps of workers that do that while they defend.

Goblin Squad Member

@TNR

It should be entirely possible to buy your gear from players that enjoy crafting. As a settlement administrator or as a supervisor of a structure you will probably have to, at least, coordinate maintenance or making sure that the resources are steady to keep your buildings standing. Some people will enjoy that and others can be free to play other roles.

Goblin Squad Member

Everyone needn't and shouldn't all be doing the same thing.

Gatherers provide raw materials, the result of their labor is traded with other players for money/other goods/services. If everyone decided to be a full time gatherer the economy and the social game would never take off.

Though I think it could be a good idea to concider how you intend to make yourself useful in the economy. We won't be seeing magical armor drop from the rats we kill so some way of supporting yourself will be needed.

I guess raw money will be introduced to the economy by killing humanoid monsters and from doing whatever NPC quests there are. So either do that, or offer goods or services to other players and get money that way.

Goblin Squad Member

TNR wrote:
Seriously, if I have to devote hours every week to maintaining resources and putting so much work into crafting then I probably will NOT play this game. Crafting gear is good. But I want to be able to buy it at a store too or buy it at an auction. I don't want to be forced to make all of my equipment, especially with all the steps involved.

You will absolutely be able to buy whatever resources and gear you want from other players. You will not be forced to spend your time harvesting or crafting.

Goblin Squad Member

To Tnr: As Nihimon said above have no worries about being force to craft. There are many like me who are looking forward to crafting and having folk buy our stuff instead of the usual mmo crafting scene were you just level your skill and vendor trash most of what you make.

You do not like crafting I do not like pvp. What great about this game is I craft for you and you protect my lily white crafter butt when I go out into the whole wide wicked world.

It what will make this game so much fun over theme parks were no one need anyone until the end game and then they are usually very picky about who the need. Never me that for sure.

Goblin Squad Member

Also, I'm fairly certain that it's been mentioned that it is possible to be both a Crafter and an 'Adventurer'. I'll see if I can pull up the exact comment.

Adventurer's are to go out into the wilds and collect 'exotic' materials needed for the 'better' crafted materials, but the stated focus of the game will be Kingdom-Building, PvP and Crafting.

So that's Mining (Metals, Stone), Forestry (Lumber, Clearing land), Farming (Meat, Hides, Crops, Herbs), Alchemy (Poison, Healing, Buffing), Wood-Working (Turning lumber into finished wooden crafting components and items), Smithing (Turning stone into finished metal crafting components and items), Tailoring/Leatherworking (Turning produce from the farms into clothing- and armor components), Enchanting (applying magical bonuses to the finished items), Paper-Milling (Turning Lumber into Paper for Wizard spell-books, Spell-Scrolls, Parchment for Maps, Flyers and Letters), Building (utilizing Wood-, Stone- and Metal Components to make the outer shells of buildings), Internal Building (utilizing Wood-, Stone- and Metal Components to furnish the internal spaces of a building) and probably two or three score other paths I can't think of at 4 in the morning.

Nobody is going to be able to 'do it all'.

Nobody is going to be relegated to 'Bob the Farmer' because the whole game will fall over in a heap if they don't do it.

Goblin Squad Member

Just remember where the best non-magical potions in town are made, and I'll even throw in a trained monkey with every batch of 100 bought. Obviously, the monkey will need a larger vial.

I intend to be a gatherer/crafter first and foremost. I'll go wandering the woods for those exotic herbs and no doubt have to fight off the occasional Big Bad Wolf. For that I'll have a few combat powers but I will mainly be looking to team up with some dumb sword-ape to grunt and swing steel at anything with spikes or big teeth.

A perfect combination - I don't need to be a combat monster and the sword-ape can play Decapitation all day long.

;)

Goblin Squad Member

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If settlements, or even individual characters, were completely self sufficient, then PFO would lose a bit of the second "M" of MMO.

If a settlement was self sufficient it could essentially wall itself off from the rest if the world and avoid interaction. Granted there may be valid RP reasons for this desire, it would be at the expense of PVP, which is a more significant design focus of PFO.

Goblin Squad Member

Hopefully we'll be able to reach 'Self Sufficient', but that only to a point.

For example, a 'mid-level' settlement might become self sufficient ... but to reach it's 'maximum' level, it will need to consume more that what the crafters and gatherers in a single Hex alone can provide.

And of course, until they reach that 'maximum' level, Escalations can and will ruin the mechanisms they have set up to attain that self-sufficient state.

Goblins burning down their farms, Druids dismantling the lumber mills, Bandits taking over their mines, Green Dragon Whelps infesting their waterways, there's no end of the shenanigans that Goblinworks can throw at such a settlement to keep things from becoming too dull.

Goblinworks Executive Founder

I think the point is that no settlement can be located where they can have farms (plains), mines (mountains), lumber mills (forests), peat mines (swamps), mills (rivers or hills), and everything else that is required. Any settlement in such a position will have to have a military alliance as strong or stronger than the strongest aggressive group.

Goblin Squad Member

Yeah, 'self-sufficient' isn't the best term. I believe every settlement will have access to goods, services, trade, training and buildings. Just not most types of each and definately not all. Self sufficient means you can feed , shelter and clothe yourself for a long period of time. At least, imho. When the devs say no to complete self-sufficiency, I think they mean settlements will have to interact in order to grow, just like PCs.

Goblin Squad Member

Question concerning management of the crafting queue:

Can the head blacksmith, for example, bump specific jobs to the front of the queue or change the priority of a critical job to be handled sooner than others?

In the case of something that might be needed for the city, or preparations for war, it seems like managing priority is rather important. Plus it opens the way to other forms of monetary gain, like bribing or simply a tax to further line the city's coffers (or the blacksmith's pockets).

Goblin Squad Member

The EVE equivalent of relics are rare ancient blueprints that allow the manufacture (often only a few runs) of rare and desirable ships. The occasional unlimited run blueprint of a capital ship is worth phenominal amounts. So much that very few people would even consider taking one out of a station at all, even with a 200 ship fleet.

In PFO terms the equivalent is an ancient "recipe" to craft a limited number of a rare wondrous item. Finding ancient recipes rather than the items themselves fits the overall PFO mechanics of "everythinbg is crafted" much better.

Goblinworks Executive Founder

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Better yet: Instructions for how to create a one part of a major artifact, or the 'blueprints' are easy to make but there are rare ingredients. For the biggest things (several years down the line) the blueprints are rare and many of the ingredients are rare.

Goblin Squad Member

Do any of you have a real life? It seems trying to keep up gets me further behind, until no one is following the thread.

OK, I like the artifact idea. I like the idea that it is a settlement effect. I propose (if someone else has not) that the artifact must have a public exposure (on a roof, on the horn of a statue, ...) to work. A settlement can have more than one but all must have exposure to work.

Lam, a troll

Goblin Squad Member

Whoa there Cowboy! Who said you were a troll?

What is a "real" life?

Goblin Squad Member

Clearly, trying to keep up while falling further behind evaluates as 'real'.

Scarab Sages Goblin Squad Member

Harad Navar wrote:

I think that there should be a game mechanism to incorporate an object connected to player/character RP story some way into PFO.

For example, when the courier (from @Hobs example) is robbed, the object could vanish as if destroyed (if not looted), only to reappear at a later date in the general vicinity, possibly as a monster drop.

"What's that, Deagol? Where'd you get that shiny sword?

Did you remember it was my birthday?"

Goblin Squad Member

Lam wrote:

Do any of you have a real life? It seems trying to keep up gets me further behind, until no one is following the thread.

OK, I like the artifact idea. I like the idea that it is a settlement effect. I propose (if someone else has not) that the artifact must have a public exposure (on a roof, on the horn of a statue, ...) to work. A settlement can have more than one but all must have exposure to work.

Lam, a troll

Now you're knocking our hobbies? You are a troll.

Scarab Sages Goblin Squad Member

Tinyish wrote:

I have a few ideas that will accomplish both of these.

The bandit does what he does and is left with a corpse full of goodies on the ground in front of him and an angry player who may be coming for some revenge.

The corpse should never just disappear immediately when looted; that negates the conflict between the players. If the bandit loots and the corpse disappears then one guy is angry and poor while another guy is richer and happy. The only reason at that point for them to interact would be for revenge, which just isn't enough in my mind.

It should take some time to loot an item. I'd say ten seconds. The bandit must keep the window open to loot. Multiple bandits can loot the same corpse at the same time, each taking whatever they like as fast as they can. At some point the corpse begins to decay, destroying one random item from the corpse every five or ten seconds until everything is gone or the player who owns the corpse returns to it. The corpse decay could start either as soon as looting starts or a few second in, or when the loot window is closed.

It gives the player the option of running back to the corpse with friends to chase you away and get whatever remains instead of all of it just being instantly gone. This would be especially worth it if you were carrying an especially large load.

This would mean that you could get a good handful of items from the corpse in the couple of minutes that it takes the player to get back to you and you'll then likely have to defend yourself. It also means that if you just wanted to hit and run that you aren't going to get as much unless you stick around long enough to be chased away.....

This is the model I would like to see.

Make looting the body take time and effort.
Those who take the time and effort should gain the reward, at the risk of being discovered.
If an item is small, and easily concealed, it should be considered to be hidden, unless it has been declared to be worn prominently for its effects. Maybe the courier swallowed the item?

It also means that carrying out a hit on a target in a crowded place does not result in the assassin being gifted with an immediate boost to his inventory.
Hit and run attacks become exactly that.

Goblin Squad Member

I like the way this is going:

1. The Significant Item gets lost during the raid on the caravan. The bandits can't loot it.

2. It gets found by A N Other creature and carried away to its lair.

3. It later appears as treasure in a dungeon manifesting in that region.

Scarab Sages Goblin Squad Member

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Quandary wrote:
escalation/NPC faction artifact: something that lets you use given monsters/ faction NPCs as town guards.

[Sean Bean]"They have a Cave Troll.<rolls eyes>"[/Sean Bean]

Goblin Squad Member

It could be worse.

Through shenanigans and outright blood-shed, somebody might end up cementing an alliance between themselves and a Dragon/Dragon's Brood.

Imagine trying to sneak into a settlement that has Bahamut Jr at the gates ....

Goblin Squad Member

Ah.. how do I make friends with a dragon?

Goblin Squad Member

Normally, treasure, flattery and virgin princesses/priestesses.

I think the last is gonna be the hardest to find.

Woop woop woop woop! *runs away with his hands in the air*

Scarab Sages Goblin Squad Member

I didn't realise it was going to be that kind of fantasy game.

Goblin Squad Member

Snorter wrote:
I didn't realise it was going to be that kind of fantasy game.

Really depends on whether we get chainmail bikinis and studded mithral corsets one supposes.

On a slightly unrelated note all MMOs seem to attract a certain small component of players that insist on treating everything online as some form of dating service.

Goblin Squad Member

I read about a 15yo girl that set up a brothel in Second Life. Easily pulled a few grand a month in real money after conversion. I'd really rather it not be *that* kind of a game, but if it happens we can always do something about it. ;)

Goblin Squad Member

Assassinations for Public Morality Control? O.o

A picket of Paladins?

Goblin Squad Member

A thicket of druids?

Goblin Squad Member

A Fustercluck of Fighters!

A Binge of Barbarians!

A Boggle of Bards!

A Menagerie of Monks!

A Surplus of Sorcerers!

What were we talking about again?

Goblin Squad Member

HalfOrc with a Hat of Disguise wrote:


What were we talking about again?

Banning 15 year old girls in case they decide to set up brothels in lawful good settlements :D

Goblin Squad Member

HalfOrc with a Hat of Disguise wrote:

A Fustercluck of Fighters!

A Binge of Barbarians!

A Boggle of Bards!

A Menagerie of Monks!

A Surplus of Sorcerers!

What were we talking about again?

A Cavalcade of Cavaliers

Goblin Squad Member

An orgy of Oracles...

Goblin Squad Member

Not being entirely familiar with how Second Life plays, I am still trying to work out how a virtual brothel made real money.

CEO, Goblinworks

Second Life isn't a game. It's a virtual world construction system, from which people have assembled all sorts of environments and objects. The "content" in Second Life is built by the users, and there's no cohesion or backstory. There are games in Second Life, but Second Life is not a game.

Linden Bucks go into the game when people buy them, and you get a certain amount each month depending on your account subscription options. You pay Linden Bucks to rent space on the server, and you can exchange Linden Bucks with other players.

SL in-world currency (Linden Bucks) is directly convertible to USD. The company runs a currency exchange. People make "real money" on Second Life making and selling in-world objects, and getting paid to let other people access the in-world environments they've assembled/created.

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