In Pathfinder, a Wizard has caused gravity to dissappear.


Gamer Life General Discussion


In My PATHFINDER Game -- One of those pesky Wizard-types has shroud his tower in a Zero-G bubble. I'm trying to find, or develop here, rules for Zero-G movement and combat.

The Wizard has done this to make things difficult, or course.

Here is my idea for movement:
1. You can move up to your full movement, in a straight line, by pushing off, but the trouble comes at the other end when you try to stop and grab onto a wall, or ceiling, or floor. The formula I have in mind for the DC, to grab hold of something at the end point, is: 18-[int(10*(1 - percent of full-movement chosen))]. This scales from 8-18, and seems fun enough. A miss would cause a d8 roll, generating a random compass direction, and a bounce at 1/2 the entry speed and at a 45 degree angle outward.

I have nothing for combat yet. Ideas?


Hostile levitation

Why not start with this spell, from the PRD, and work from there?


Terquem wrote:

Hostile levitation

Why not start with this spell, from the PRD, and work from there?

Yes, spells are easy.

It's the not having any spells left that I'm working on.


Being caught in the radius of effect of a fireball is going to be interesting. The affected PC will bounce of 1d4 walls before slowing down enough to have a DC 18 of grabbing onto the next wall.

Let's do: 4d6 damage for the first wall, and less a d6 for each wall-bounce afterwards.


I'm going to need some *special* conditions for certain states of movement too:

1. Hyperspin - The PC is spinning so fast that no actions are possible.
2. Stall - The PC is left stranded out of reach of all walls and is a sitting target.
3. Bounce - d8 roll generating a random compass direction, and a bounce at 1/2 the entry speed and at a 45 degree angle outward.
4.


Well ... the Planar Adventures chapter of the Game Mastery Guide has a section on gravity. It says:

Game Mastery Guide wrote:
No Gravity: Individuals on a plane with this trait merely float in space, unless other resources are available to provide a direction for gravity's pull.

So if there's no gravity around the tower, then they need jet packs. Or a wand of Gust of Wind, or similar.

Although, if they're still under the effects of inertia from the planet spinning under them when they step into the area of no gravity, they well might get spun backwards away from the area, or into it, depending on which side they enter from, in which case they're going to wind up taking falling damage. Or maybe I'm overthinking this.


You're making assumptions about how spells work that are clearly not supportible from the description of the spells. What I meant to suggest above was that instead of coming up with a lot of ideas about how this "no gravity" area is going to work, just use the spell above as the rule.

For instance who told you that a "magic fireball" is equivelant to an explosion? Maybe a "Magic fireball" does a whole lot of "ouch" ("it burns it burns") but doesn't actually compress the atmosphere in any way that would cause a pressure wave of significant power to displace an object with a mass equivelent to 150 punds-mass in normal gravity.

Keep it simple. Give the players the "feel" that something is different, but do not try to re invent the wheel.

Sovereign Court

Performing Artist wrote:

Being caught in the radius of effect of a fireball is going to be interesting. The affected PC will bounce of 1d4 walls before slowing down enough to have a DC 18 of grabbing onto the next wall.

Let's do: 4d6 damage for the first wall, and less a d6 for each wall-bounce afterwards.

I don't see any purpose in adding more damage atop fireball's damage. Why would they bounce? It's just a wave of intense heat, not an explosion.


Hama wrote:
Performing Artist wrote:

Being caught in the radius of effect of a fireball is going to be interesting. The affected PC will bounce of 1d4 walls before slowing down enough to have a DC 18 of grabbing onto the next wall.

Let's do: 4d6 damage for the first wall, and less a d6 for each wall-bounce afterwards.

I don't see any purpose in adding more damage atop fireball's damage. Why would they bounce? It's just a wave of intense heat, not an explosion.

Food for thought. I still make Fireballs explode.


Terquem wrote:
What I meant to suggest above was that instead of coming up with a lot of ideas about how this "no gravity" area is going to work, just use the spell above as the rule.

Ah! Now I understand you. Yes, I will attempt to incorporate these kind of game "mechanics" from known spells.

What other spells seem useful?


Tinalles wrote:
So if there's no gravity around the tower, then they need jet packs. Or a wand of Gust of Wind, or similar.

Now this is interesting. Jet packs... jet packs...


Basically, melee combat will be useless except for Grappling. Ranged weapons will be really fun (and have infinite range.)


Again, you seem to be making assumptions based upon what you want to be and not what is. Research mission on the international space station and you will learn that swinging a wrench (with significant mass) in a zero g environment is as lethal as swinging it anywhere else. The lack of a gravitational "pull" (remember gravity isn't a "thing" it is an effect), does not imply that things like mass, and inertia stop being what they are. Objects do not "bounce" around just because there is not a localized field of gravity.

Basically, with no localized gravitational pull (a property of a very large mass) objects will still behave under (for simplicity sake) the three laws of motion.

1 - an object at rest remains at rest and an object in motion remains in motion, unless acted upon by an outside force

2 - the acceleration of a body is proportional to the force applied to it and inversely proportional to its mass

3 - for every action force there is a re action force equal in magnitude and opposite in direction


There's a zero-G room in the first book of the Runelords AP. A couple of snippets from that room's description:

Read to players: This strange room consists of a fifteen-foot-diameter sphere. Several objects float in the room, spinning lazily in space —- a
ragged book, a scroll, a bottle of wine, a dead raven surrounded by a halo of floating and writhing maggots, and a twisted iron wand with a forked tip.

For the GM: This unusual room still bears a magical effect placed here long ago. Any creature or object that enters the room is immediately
affected by a levitate spell and floats in the air.

Sovereign Court

Levitate isn't the same as zero-g


Terquem wrote:

Again, you seem to be making assumptions based upon what you want to be and not what is. Research mission on the international space station and you will learn that swinging a wrench (with significant mass) in a zero g environment is as lethal as swinging it anywhere else. The lack of a gravitational "pull" (remember gravity isn't a "thing" it is an effect), does not imply that things like mass, and inertia stop being what they are. Objects do not "bounce" around just because there is not a localized field of gravity.

Basically, with no localized gravitational pull (a property of a very large mass) objects will still behave under (for simplicity sake) the three laws of motion.

1 - an object at rest remains at rest and an object in motion remains in motion, unless acted upon by an outside force

2 - the acceleration of a body is proportional to the force applied to it and inversely proportional to its mass

3 - for every action force there is a re action force equal in magnitude and opposite in direction

Your ultracrepidarianism has done you in this time.

Sczarni

One idea: consider adapting the rules for underwater movement. Underwater action takes place in 3d just like zero-g does. Movement will be more difficult, of course, with air instead of water to "swim" against. Flying creatures should still do fine, but humanoids will indeed want to improvise some sort of jet or fan propulsion.


Hama wrote:

Levitate isn't the same as zero-g

No, but the "read to players" part clearly describes zero-G, and the GM text indicates the effect is based on levitation.


If you are in Zero-G and you cast a spell, like Fireball, will the momentum of the fireball leaving your hand push you backwards?
(Fireball is just an example? Some spells, like Sleep, would not have a
momentum kick backwards, but some other spells should.)

I should make a list...

.


Who said that a Fire Ball has momentum when it leaves your hand? Maybe it isn't even "real" until it actually causes fire damage to objects on the material plane.

In my campaign settings, magic is always the ineraction of material from one plane of existence interfering with material from another plane of existence.


Terquem wrote:
Who said that a Fire Ball has momentum when it leaves your hand?

No one. That's part of the question.

Possible answers can be: 1. Yes fireball does have momentum, or 2. No
fireball does not have momentum. There may be other answers.

I'm computing, or is it calculating (maybe determining), the consequences
of, in turn, both 1. and 2. being actively the case (or state-of-being,
for particular gaming situations, but all specifically in Zero-G).
Answer 2. is most easy, because it's "nothing".

First, I'm going to assume "1. Yes fireball does have momentum." Then, I'm
going to make a list of all spells, in addition to Fireball, the could (if deemed reasonable)
have momentum, and try to figure out what would/could/should be the
consequences in a Zero-G environment.

(Projecting. That may be the word...)

However:
I may get bored and stop doing this.

.

Terquem wrote:
... the ineraction of material ...

Isn't this momentum?

.


Remember that Zero-G is not the same as no atmosphere. Ranged weapons should not have an infinite range - there's still friction from air that will cause them to slow and eventually stop.


"material" in this case is not always assumed to be matter

Does something that is made up of "pure energy" of a kind not understood by modern science, have momentum?


Terquem wrote:

"material" in this case is not always assumed to be matter

Does something that is made up of "pure energy" of a kind not understood by modern science, have momentum?

If I get to make the game mechanics then, for the moment, let's say Yes.

Now, what are the consequences of this for casting in a zero-g environment
(with a "normal" atmosphere) ?

If you are saying "No" and amped up to fight me, then this thread is not for you.
Please don't troll.

.

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